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Scotland’s weather: Warning for drivers

Police Scotland said there was a high risk of disruption on many roads due to flooding and the possibility of falling trees and other debris. Picture: Ian Rutherford

Police Scotland said there was a high risk of disruption on many roads due to flooding and the possibility of falling trees and other debris. Picture: Ian Rutherford

  • by NATALIE WALKER
 

DRIVERS have been warned to take care on Scotland’s roads as wet and windy weather is forecast for the next few days.

Police Scotland said there was a high risk of disruption on many roads due to flooding and the possibility of falling trees and other debris.

The worst affected routes are in Dumfries and Galloway, where some roads remain closed as a result of last week’s gale force winds.

A Police Scotland spokesman last night said: “We are advising drivers that conditions for travel are extremely poor and there is a high risk of disruption for road journeys in Scotland. If you do travel, you are likely to experience significant delays. Winter driving is a question of common sense and drivers should ask themselves if they really need to travel when conditions are poor.”

Some homes in Scotland remained without electricity for a second night as engineers worked to restore supplies after the storms.

Scottish Hydro said several hundred customers – in small pockets in rural areas across Argyll, Perthshire, Stirlingshire, the Highlands and Shetland – were still without power last night.

The biggest problem has come from uprooted trees and other debris, which has been blown on to overhead power lines, causing damage and bringing down the lines in some areas.

At the height of the storms, the entire Scottish rail network was closed and power was cut to 130,000 properties.

Last week’s fierce Atlantic storm caused widespread disruption and claimed two lives, including that of lorry driver Robert Dellow, 54, from Lowestoft in Suffolk, whose vehicle overturned in West Lothian.

Record-breaking sea levels were recorded along the east coast through a combination of large waves and a tidal surge, the Environmental Agency said.

Dr Paul Leinster, chief executive of the EA, said: “Over the last three days we issued an unprecedented number of severe flood warnings.”

Insurers yesterday revealed they are bracing themselves for new claims over damage to homes and businesses.

Malcolm Tarling, of the Association of British Insurers, urged those affected to contact insurers straight away.

He said a number of insurance companies were already in some of the worst hit areas and would be checking their records and calling customers as their priority was “to get claims moving as quickly as possible”.

Heavy rain is due across many parts of Western Scotland today with patchier outbreaks due in eastern areas.

 

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