In pictures: The Queensferry Crossing as it stands

The new Forth bridge will be the third crossing at the Queensferry narrows. Picture: Ian Rutherford

The new Forth bridge will be the third crossing at the Queensferry narrows. Picture: Ian Rutherford

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IT’S the biggest construction project in Scotland and will eventually provide a third bridge over the Forth narrows between North and South Queensferry.

Work on the Queensferry Crossing began in 2011 and is due to be completed next year. Its three towers, each standing at 207m tall, will become a landmark for future generations of Scots, as familiar as the two older bridges that stand alongside.

Work continues on the southern approach road to the Queensferry Crossing. Picture: Phil Wilkinson

Work continues on the southern approach road to the Queensferry Crossing. Picture: Phil Wilkinson

The latest Forth bridge was signed off by the Scottish Government in 2007 following years of speculation on whether another crossing was required.

A cable-stayed design was chosen, with an overall length of 1.7 miles. Around 2.5 miles of new approach links will be built, with a major new junction constructed at Ferrytoll, near Inverkeithing, allowing access to both the new bridge and the older crossing, which will be retained for public transport.

Unlike the present Forth Road Bridge, the Queensferry Crossing will be designed as motorway standard with hard shoulders running alongside two lanes of traffic travelling north and south.

Pedestrians and cyclists will thus not be allowed on the new bridge, but will still be able to cross the Forth via the suspension bridge, which opened in 1964.

The Queensferry Crossing is seen in the distance from the Forth Bridge, opened in 1890, with the village of North Queensferry and the Forth Road Bridge in between. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

The Queensferry Crossing is seen in the distance from the Forth Bridge, opened in 1890, with the village of North Queensferry and the Forth Road Bridge in between. Picture: Lisa Ferguson

The name of the new bridge was revealed in 2013 following a consultation in which members of the public were invited to submit suggestions.

Queensferry refers to the ferry service that linked the settlements of North and South Queensferry for more than 800 years.

The first regular sailings are said to have been established by St Margaret of Scotland, wife of King Malcolm III, in the late 11th century for the benefit of pilgrims travelling to St Andrews.

The ferry continued after the opening of the first Forth Bridge, which carries the east coast mainline, in 1890 and soon found a new role transporting cars.

The Queensferry Crossing construction as seen from St Margaret's Hope, between North Queensferry and Rosyth Dockyard. Picture: Ian Rutherford

The Queensferry Crossing construction as seen from St Margaret's Hope, between North Queensferry and Rosyth Dockyard. Picture: Ian Rutherford

It finally ceased in 1964 upon the opening of Forth Road Bridge.

The new bridge viewed from near Port Edgar in April 2015. Picture: Ian Rutherford

The new bridge viewed from near Port Edgar in April 2015. Picture: Ian Rutherford

The new bridge is scheduled to be completed by 2016. Picture: Ian Rutherford

The new bridge is scheduled to be completed by 2016. Picture: Ian Rutherford

First Alex Salmond reveals the name of the Queensferry Crossing at a ceremony in 2013

First Alex Salmond reveals the name of the Queensferry Crossing at a ceremony in 2013

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