Forth Road Bridge: 40mph limit for crossing works

The three towers on the Queensferry Crossing at night. Picture: Paul Baralos
The three towers on the Queensferry Crossing at night. Picture: Paul Baralos
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DRIVERS using the Forth Road Bridge will soon be slowed to 40mph, enforced by new average speed cameras, during roadworks for the adjacent Queensferry Crossing, Transport Scotland announced today.

The news came as project chiefs revealed the height of the three 210m towers of the new bridge had passed their halfway point, with the crossing on course to open at the end of next year - or possibly earlier.

The new Queensferry Crossing so far. Picture: Hemedia

The new Queensferry Crossing so far. Picture: Hemedia

The current Forth Road 50mph limit will be lowered from the Spring until the Queensferry Crossing opens while new junctions are built at either end.

It will be in force over some three miles between the A90 Echline junction with the A904 in South Queensferry and the M90 Admiralty junction with the A985 at Rosyth in Fife.

Journey times are expected to increase by one minute.

The bridge work includes a major upgrading of the A90 Ferrytoll junction just north of the bridge where traffic on the two bridges will meet.

Infrastructure secretary Keith Brown was due to view progress on the new bridge today, where the towers are now between 112m and 116m high.

They are due to reach their full height this summer, when they will dwarf the 156m high towers of the Forth Road Bridge.

The bridge deck is due to be finished by Spring next year, enabling workers to cross from end to end for the first time.

Mr Brown said the £1.35-1.4 billion project was “one of the most significant bridge projects under way in the world”.

“I am very pleased to say that the project continues on schedule and under budget.”

Project director David Climie said the final cost could be cut further because of low inflation and lack of disputes and other delays, and open earlier than the expected December 2016 date.

The cost has already fallen from £1.6 billion.

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