Tory MP: Traditional Chinese medicine can treat cancer and HIV

A Conservative MP said Chinese medice could be used to treat cancer. Picture: TSPL STAFF.

A Conservative MP said Chinese medice could be used to treat cancer. Picture: TSPL STAFF.

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Chinese herbal medicine can help treat cancers and HIV, a Conservative MP has said.

David Tredinnick said many of his constituents are only alive today because they have been treated with alternative medicine.

And the MP for Bosworth urged ministers to spend more NHS money on therapies such as homeopathy and acupuncture to treat patients.

Mr Tredinnick said he received acupuncture at a Chinese medical clinic just before the Commons debate on cancer strategy - a regular treatment he credits with keeping him healthy.

He told MPs: “I was talking there to practitioners about what they are able to do for cancer patients, and there is actually a very long list of types of cancer that can be treated using traditional Chinese herbal medicine.

“One, cervical cancer, two, non-Hodkins lymphoma, three, HIV, four, colon cancer, five... six, breast cancer, seven, prostate cancer. And so the list goes on.

“I have in my constituency several constituents who I believe are alive today because they have used Chinese medicine.

“And the reason for that is what it does is it strengthens your system, and it strengthens the immune system, and it is very effective after cancer treatment. It deals with particular symptoms.”

He said it alleviates tiredness, lack of energy, fevers, seizures and twitching.

And the MP, who has previously said astrology could play a role in healthcare, urged ministers to spend more money on alternative therapies.

He said: “We have got to broaden the scope of services that are available in the health service to help meet patient demand.”

Shadow public health minister Sharon Hodgson expressed concern about the impact of shrinking public health budgets on things like smoking cessation services which help prevent cancer.

She said: “The false economy of cutting public health funding with no assessment made of the ramifications it will have on the various aspects of our lives or other parts of the NHS and the wider health service is seriously worrying.”

She also raised concerns about funding levels for cancer services.

She said: “It is clear that what we have seen is investment failing to keep up with demand.”

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