The forgotten torpedo testing of Loch Lomond

Fish eye view of the gallery Picture: Ben Cooper
Fish eye view of the gallery Picture: Ben Cooper
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THERE are many parts of Scotland the general public are unaware of - but thanks to urban explorers these sites are being captured before they’re lost forever.

Loch Lomond is known as a popular site for nationals and tourists alike - but what many don’t know is that it was also the site of a torpedo testing range.

The exterior of the testing site Picture: Ben Cooper

The exterior of the testing site Picture: Ben Cooper

The site seems simplistic - a giant tank filled with water was used to test the launching, running and impact of torpedoes. It dates from the same era as the Loch Long testing site, and was used frequently during both WWI and WWII.

The tank looks like a massive swimming pool, with gantries and cranes to lift the test torpedoes.

There was also labs on site, now used in training exercises.

Along the tank is a reinforced viewing window and gallery, allowing scientists to watch the progress of the torpedoes along the tank.

The site was still used for training exercises Picture: Ben Cooper

The site was still used for training exercises Picture: Ben Cooper

The impact target appears to be a huge hydraulic arm, capable of withstanding the massive force from the torpedoes.

The site is now being redeveloped into a resort area.

See more images at Transient Places Blog

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A view from the gallery Picture: Ben Cooper

A view from the gallery Picture: Ben Cooper

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The reinforced glass of the tank Picture: Ben Cooper

The reinforced glass of the tank Picture: Ben Cooper

The tank where experiments were carried out Picture: Ben Cooper

The tank where experiments were carried out Picture: Ben Cooper

Picture: Ben Cooper

Picture: Ben Cooper

One of the control panels Picture: Ben Cooper

One of the control panels Picture: Ben Cooper

An imposing structure Picture: Ben Cooper

An imposing structure Picture: Ben Cooper