Sturgeon pledges £1m to aid poorer countries with climate change

The money, from the Scottish Governments Climate Justice Fund, will go to a United Nations scheme set up as part of the Paris Agreement
The money, from the Scottish Governments Climate Justice Fund, will go to a United Nations scheme set up as part of the Paris Agreement
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NICOLA Sturgeon has announced £1 million of government cash will be spent helping poorer nations monitor climate change, with the First Minister hailing the move as a sign Scotland is an “open, outward-looking country”.

The SNP leader said the action was necessary because all countries “have to deliver” to combat global warming.

She made the comments as she addressed the Arctic Circle Assembly in Reykjavik, Iceland – which brings together about 2,000 people from 50 countries across the world who all have an interest in the development of the Arctic and its consequences for the planet.

The money, from the Scottish Government’s Climate Justice Fund, will go to a United Nations scheme set up as part of the Paris Agreement that was agreed by the representatives of 195 countries in December 2015.

Announcing the funding, Ms Sturgeon said: “Scotland may not geographically be part of the Arctic Circle but like every delegate here today we are committed to acting on climate change and limiting global temperature increases to below 1.5C (2.7F).

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“We know the most damaging effects of climate change are in developing nations and fall disproportionately on the very young, the very old and the very poor.

“That’s why Scotland was the first national government in the world to establish a Climate Justice Fund, which now supports 11 projects in some of the world’s poorest communities in four sub-Saharan African countries.”

She added: “Following the Paris Agreement on climate change, countries can’t just stand back and wait – we all have to deliver.

“The funding I am announcing today will help developing countries better-measure and track climate change, leading to a greater global understanding of how effective we are in limiting its effects.

“This is also a clear signal that we’ll do everything we can to remain an open, outward-looking country that works to strengthen our partnerships around the world.”

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