Son of murder victim Jenny Methven to donate £86k damages to charity

Victim Jenny Methven was killed with a blunt instrument. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency (PPA)

Victim Jenny Methven was killed with a blunt instrument. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency (PPA)

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A MURDERED pensioner’s ­favourite charities are to share more than £86,000 after her killer was ordered to compensate her grieving son.

The Earl Haig Trust, the Perthshire Abandoned Dogs Society and Perthshire Gun Dog Rescue will benefit from David Methven’s victory at the Court of Session in Edinburgh yesterday.

Forensics officers at the scene of the crime. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency (PPA)

Forensics officers at the scene of the crime. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency (PPA)

The 60-year-old will receive £86,184 from William Kean for the distress caused by thinking of the suffering endured by his mother Jenny, 80, and the loss of her companionship.

Kean was jailed for 22 years for killing Mrs Methven at the cottage she shared with her son at Forteviot in Perthshire in 2012.

Mr Methven – who found his mother’s body – sued Kean, who chose not to defend the action. This prompted judge Lord Philip to order Kean to hand over the cash to Mr Methven.

Mr Methven plans to donate the money to his animal-loving mother’s favourite charities.

He lost not only his mother but also his family home

Advocate Michael Stuart

Kean, 50, claimed at his trial that Mr Methven was involved in the murder. However, the jury rejected his allegations and ­convicted him.

Michael Stuart, Mr Methven’s advocate, told the Court of Session his client’s life had been turned upside down following the death of his mother.

He said Mr Methven felt he had to leave their home.

Mr Stuart said: “After his mother’s murder, Mr Methven felt he could no longer reside there and accordingly lost not only his mother but also his family home.

David Methven at his mother's funeral. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency

David Methven at his mother's funeral. Picture: Perthshire Picture Agency

“The many happy memories associated with his mother and his family home have been tainted. It was Mr Methven who found his mother’s body and reported it to the authorities, an experience he found very ­distressing.

“In these circumstances, I move for decree by default against William Kean.

“It is Mr Methven’s intention to donate any damages he receives in this action to charity.”

Mrs Methven was in her kitchen when Kean, who had known her son for 20 years, struck her with a blunt instrument.

His trial heard that in the months before the murder he had worked at their home and was trusted by both.

Mr Methven returned to find his mother slumped in a chair and a towel over her head.

Mr Stuart said: “During William Kean’s trial, a defence was advanced that sought to implicate Mr Methven in his mother’s death.

“William Kean sought to imply that Mr Methven had links to criminality. There was no evidence to support these assertions and the assertions were plainly rejected by the jury.

“As one might expect, however, the assertions were reported in the press at the time and Mr Methven feels his image has been tarnished.

“Mr Methven is a very private man who has had his personal and financial affairs paraded in the public domain as a consequence of the approach taken by Mr Kean at trial.

“Again, that was distressing for him.

“Now at proof, William Kean does not appear to argue what sums he ought to pay in compensation for taking the life of David Methven’s mother.

“In my submission, fairness dictates that the matter, in so far as it can be brought to an end, ought now to be brought to an end for David Methven.”

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