Section of walkway collapses into River Clyde

A section of the Clyde walkway collapsed at Anderston Quay in Glasgow. Picture: Robert Perry

A section of the Clyde walkway collapsed at Anderston Quay in Glasgow. Picture: Robert Perry

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A 50-YARD section of riverbank walkway near Glasgow city centre collapsed into the River Clyde yesterday.

• The affected section had been fenced off a week ago after nearby grass was found to have sunk

• Strathclyde Police said they were alerted to the collapse at 7:40am today

• There were no reports of anyone being involved

The affected section of the combined footpath, cyclepath and quay wall had been fenced off a week ago after nearby grass was found to have sunk.

The collapse, which was ten feet wide, happened on the north bank of the river, just west of the Kingston Bridge.

Glasgow City Council said repairs had been scheduled to take place before the grass “depression” was spotted nine days ago. Strathclyde Police said they had been alerted to the collapse at 7:40am yesterday, but there were no reports of anyone being involved.

The walkway connects the city centre with the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, but there is a narrow path beside a parallel road on to which walkers had been diverted.

A council spokesman said: “A depression in the walkway was noticed last Wednesday. That afternoon, council staff assessed the depression and fenced off the walkway.

“The assessment indicated a failure in the quay wall. A local contractor with a good working knowledge of the quay walls in the area is now on-site. The contractor is carrying out investigations on the quay wall and is monitoring it daily. Local businesses and residents have been informed.”

The council said it was responsible for more than three miles of walkway along the Clyde. The entire length was last checked in September as part of an annual inspection, with the section which collapsed found to be the only part requiring repairs.

The spokesman said: “There was nothing to suggest there is going to be any repeat elsewhere.”

The quayside involved is believed to include the original wall constructed in the 19th century when the area was used by shipping.

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