Scottish health boards in £282m budget boost

Health Secretary Shona Robison said tackling delayed discharge is an 'absolute key priority' for the government. Picture: John Devlin

Health Secretary Shona Robison said tackling delayed discharge is an 'absolute key priority' for the government. Picture: John Devlin

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HEALTH boards in Scotland are to receive an additional £282 million in 2015-16, the health secretary has announced.

The Scottish Government said that territorial health boards have been given a general allocation increase of 3.4 per cent on 2014-15, bringing the total allocation to boards to more than £8.5 billion.

In addition to this, the Government’s announcement of £30 million in 2015-16 to tackle delays in discharging patients from hospital will be added to boards’ budgets, bringing the total increase to 3.8 per cent.

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Health Secretary Shona Robison said tackling delayed discharge is an “absolute key priority” for the government and that the £30 million, which forms part of a £100 million investment over the next three years, is “crucial” to this effort.

Announcing the funding she said: “The Scottish Government’s commitment to increasing health boards’ budgets demonstrates our continuing investment in frontline health spending.

“This comes as Scotland’s total health spending reaches more than £12 billion for the first time ever.

“We’re clear that all patients in Scotland should be treated as quickly and as effectively as possible, with the right care, in the right place, at the right time. With this increase in funding, health boards are being given more support to achieve this.

“We know there is still pressure on the NHS and this Government is acting to deliver record funding and robust policies needed to support the hardworking and dedicated staff of our NHS.”

She added: “Reducing delayed discharge not only helps individual patients, who benefit from getting home or to a homely setting as quickly as possible, but also helps ease pressure across the system.

“As we head towards the integration of health and social care this additional funding will also support work under way to transform care services which will get people who may be unnecessarily staying in hospital home or into a homely setting.”

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