Scots bus company refuses to accept Scottish bank note

Lisa Bryce (31) with her son Charles Carter (3 months old). Picture: Sarah Standing

Lisa Bryce (31) with her son Charles Carter (3 months old). Picture: Sarah Standing

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A MUM has been left humiliated and embarrassed after a driver from a Scottish bus company refused to accept her Scottish bank note.

Lisa Bryce said she tried to get on a First bus from her home in Portsmouth with her three-month-old baby Charles and mum, Christine but the bus driver refused to accept the 31-year-old’s Scottish £10 note.

Lisa, who moved to the area from Glasgow last year, said the driver’s behaviour was unacceptable.

She said: ‘My mum tried to pay for our tickets but she only had a Scottish £10 note. The driver said he didn’t have any change.

‘I asked if it was because it was Scottish money, but he just looked away sheepishly. I could see he had change in the little box but he just kept saying he didn’t have any change.

‘He was being really aggressive about it.’

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Lisa said she only had £3 in loose change but needed £4 for the fare, so they were forced to get off the bus.

She said: ‘It was raining, but the only thing we could do was to get off and walk home.

‘I was humiliated and it made me feel really low. It was hugely embarrassing.

Considering First is a Scottish company it’s just not right that they don’t accept Scottish notes, which are legal tender. I need to know I can get on a bus and it won’t happen again.’

First Solent general manager Dervla McKay said it was an unfortunate incident which should not have happened.

Ms McKay said: ‘We are very sorry about the way in which Ms Bryce and her mother were treated.

‘We are a Scottish-based company and as such, we accept Scottish bank notes and all other legal tender.

‘It was unfortunate that in this instance, the driver did not take the bank note.

‘As a result, we will be re-briefing our staff that we do accept Scottish bank notes as a form of payment.’

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