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Large Hadron Collider exhibition at Scottish Parliament

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  • by SHAN ROSS
 

A FULL-SIZE replica of part of the Large Hadron Collider “atom smasher” goes on display tomorrow as part of a week-long exhibition celebrating Scotland’s contribution to the world’s largest science experiment at CERN in Geneva.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on Tour exhibition, which includes a cross-section of the tunnel which lies 100m beneath the Franco-Swiss border, highlights the work of scientists, researchers and engineers from Scottish universities contributing to the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator.

Professor Peter Higgs, Emeritus professor at the University of Edinburgh, worked for nearly 50 years on the Higgs-bosun “god particle” which was finally detected at the LHC last year.

Visitors to the exhibition in the Scottish Parliament can walk through the 3.8m wide cross-section of the tunnel, enjoy interactive displays and also meet Scottish and UK scientists involved in the Higgs bosun discovery.

A number of leading Scottish and UK researchers who have worked have worked with CERN will be on hand throughout the week to answer questions at the exhibition organised by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

Dr Victoria Martin, researcher and lecturer in particle physics at the University of Edinburgh, and member of the ATLAS experiment at CERN said she wanted young people to realise that although the LHC was in Geneva, people in Scotland were making a massive contribution.

“We want young people to understand that although the LHC is in Geneva there are people in Scotland working on it day to day.

“The idea is to inspire the next generation of scientists about the work being carried out, and even the possibility of them working at CERN themselves one day.”

Linda Fabiani,SNP MSP, Scottish Parliament corporate body member who arranged for the exhibition to come north of the border, said: “This is a really prestigious exhibition and the only Scottish setting for its UK-wide tour.

“It is particularly timeous considering the increasing interest in science and technology. But while you can watch television programmes and read about it you can come here and learn about a career or business opportunities in this line of research.”

 

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