Queue up for tattoo bargain

Just Jen gives Callan Anderson a tattoo. Picture: Greg Macvean
Just Jen gives Callan Anderson a tattoo. Picture: Greg Macvean
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IT is the kind of queue usually only seen during the high street sales.

But the customers waiting in line in Broughton Street weren’t after the latest handbag or cut-price fashion – they were hoping to bag a heavily-discounted tattoo.

Some recipients at the Den of Iniquity parlour were “inked” for as little as £12 as part of the promotion, raising some concerns that it was encouraging impulse buys which may be regretted later.

The Den of Iniquity sessions were being carried out to mark the 40th anniversary of the death of American tattoo 
artist Norman Keith Collins aka Sailor Jerry.

The company which bears his name was offering tattoo fans the chance to have an exclusive discounted design. The tattoos – which can only be drawn on over-18s – usually cost around £80. The Den of Iniquity was chosen by the company to bring its designs to life.

Owner Edward Staples said: “A representative from Sailor Jerry came into the shop one day, said she really liked our stuff and asked us if we wanted to be involved. We love the style Sailor Jerry worked in so were only too happy to agree.”

The cheapest designs were given to the first ten fans through the door – with the next 20 getting a pick of inks for £20.

Richard Mitchell, travelled from Ayr to bag one of the exclusive designs.

The mental health nurse –who got a Japanese geisha on his leg at the age of 14 – said: “I made sure I was here early so I had more options.

“Really pleased I got the monkey. I like the design a lot.”

And getting her first tattoo – a flaming heart on her ribcage – was 20-year-old Callan Anderson, of South Bridge.

She said: “I’m a little 
bit nervous but I’ve been wanting to get a tattoo for a while.”

One expert – who specialises in laser removal of unwanted tattoos – sounded a note of caution and said there should be a cooling off period between someone saying they want a tattoo and them getting one.

Brooke Mackay-Brock, owner of Love Hate Tattoo in Abbeyhill, said: “There’s a very high demand for laser tattoo removal or alteration and the reasons we hear most often are that it was something they got on the spur of the moment, usually at quite a young age.”

Ms Mackay-Brock said: “At my parlour there will be about a week between us booking someone in for a tattoo and actually doing it, and nine times out of ten the person will want to make some changes.”