DCSIMG

Credentials of US ambassadorial nominees quizzed

The qualifications of a number of ambassadorial nominees have been questioned by the union that represents US diplomats. Picture: Getty

The qualifications of a number of ambassadorial nominees have been questioned by the union that represents US diplomats. Picture: Getty

THE union that represents US diplomats has threatened to sue the state department.

The American Foreign Service Association (AFSA) said it will take the action unless documents are released showing the qualifications of ambassadorial nominees, amid a fierce debate over the credentials of several recent nominees.

AFSA said it would ask a court to insist on the production of the documents, known as “certificates of demonstrated competence,” if the department does not do so voluntarily. It said the department had ignored previous requests to have the documents released under the Freedom of Information Act.

The organisation added: “AFSA remains concerned about the qualifications of several ­recent nominees. AFSA’s goal is to ensure that the nation has the most qualified persons serving as ambassadors.

“AFSA believes that the president and the American people deserve nothing less.”

The lawsuit threat comes as the White House faces harsh criticism about a handful of ­ambassador nominees who have scant knowledge or expertise about the nations where they would serve. Several of those nominees were high-dollar campaign fundraisers and donors for president Barack Obama, raising concerns they were ­rewarded for their lucrative ­political support.

At least three recent ambassadorial nominees – George Tsunis for Norway, Noah Bryson Mamet for Argentina and Colleen Bell for Hungary – have raised concerns after poor performances in their hearings ­before the Senate foreign ­relations committee.

None has extensive experience with the nations where they would be stationed if ­confirmed.

Last month, AFSA, which represents about 16,000 current and retired diplomats, said it does not object to nominees who have little or no official diplomatic experience. But the group also unveiled a set of guidelines it said should be considered by the White House and Senate when choosing and confirming ambassadors.

Those include leadership, interpersonal and managerial skills, the ability to formulate high-level policy and knowledge of the foreign area.

An AFSA survey has found that 37 per cent of ambassadors during Mr Obama’s presidency are or have been political ­appointees.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page