Flagship hospital sees dramatic improvement

Waiting times have been slashed at Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. Picture: John Devlin
Waiting times have been slashed at Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. Picture: John Devlin
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The troubled Queen Elizabeth University hospital in Glasgow has seen a dramatic improvement in its emergency waiting time performance, official figures today show.

The amount of patients forced to wait beyond the national four hour target has almost halved at the new £842 million hospital.

It comes after a team of Scottish Government troubleshooters were sent into to deal with lengthy emergency waits at the flagship hospital which quickly became the longest in Scotland after opening in April.

But in the past week 94% of patients within 4 hours, just falling short of a national target of 95% - and up from 88.6%.

It means that fewer than 100 patients waited longer than four hours - down from 178 the previous week.

Robert Calderwood, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Chief Executive, said: “This positive improvement in unscheduled care performance at the new Queen Elizabeth University Hospital represents a significant step forward.

“My thanks go to the staff for their enormous efforts in responding to the challenges that bedding-in after such an enormous period of change has brought.”

Public Health Minister Maureen Watt said the figures are “very encouraging and testament to the hardworking staff at the new hospital.”

Performance dipped slightly in Scotland to 94.6% of patients being seen in 4 hours against a national target of 95%. This is despite it being the middle of summer when pressure on the NHS is at its least.

Liberal Democrat health spokesman Jim Hume said: “Week after week we see doctors and nurses doing their utmost to ensure patients get the care they need. But the hard fact is that the four hour standard has been missed again.

“Those health boards where this crucial target has been missed deserve better from SNP Ministers. They have had eight years to give hospitals the support they need but took their eye off the ball during the referendum. It is time that they delivered.”