David Cameron: No second independence referendum

Cameron insisted there would be no repeat of 2014's vote within the next five years. Picture: Getty

Cameron insisted there would be no repeat of 2014's vote within the next five years. Picture: Getty

325
Have your say

DAVID Cameron has insisted there will not be a second Scottish independence referendum as he began his second term as UK Prime Minister

Downing Street sources at the weekend said Cameron is “very concerned” about the election result, which has left just three pro-Union MPs out of 59 from Scotland.

However, Cameron has stated his intention to go ahead with Smith Commission proposals, which include handing over control of much of welfare, air passenger duty and income tax.

Asked whether he was confident he would not be the last Prime Minister of the UK, he said: “Very confident. The United Kingdom voted to stay together in that referendum.

“We had a referendum. Respect and trust should be at the heart of our system, and that’s what we did and Scotland voted emphatically to stay in the United Kingdom, which I think was an affirmation of what a great country this is.”

He repeated: “There isn’t going to be another referendum. We had the referendum and the SNP aren’t pushing for another referendum, actually – Nicola Sturgeon said that vote in the general election was not about another referendum.

“Now what we need to do is bring the United Kingdom together. We are going to do that by delivering the devolution settlement in Wales, delivering the devolution settlement in Scotland, keeping all the pledges that were made.”

Speaking after taking part in commemorations of the 70th anniversary of VE Day, Mr Cameron said: “That’s one of the things this government should be about: the idea of renewing and refreshing the United Kingdom.

“And today is a good day to remember just what the United Kingdom stands for and what it has done. The United Kingdom stood alone against Hitler. That’s what these people did.”

Back to the top of the page