Cap payday loan interest, urges Alex Salmond

Last month, Citizens Advice Scotland reported that staff dealt with 1,200 cases related to payday loans over the past three months. Picture: Getty
Last month, Citizens Advice Scotland reported that staff dealt with 1,200 cases related to payday loans over the past three months. Picture: Getty
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THE UK government should cap the interest rates of payday loan companies to better regulate the industry, the First Minister has said.

Regulation of the industry is reserved to Westminster under the consumer credit sector but Alex Salmond said lenders would be subject to tougher regulation in an independent Scotland.

Recent moves by the Church of Scotland and Church of England to expand credit unions to help people with financial needs were also welcomed by the First Minister.

The UK government has not responded to calls from Scottish ministers on the need to cap interest rates for the lenders, the Scottish Government said.

The First Minister said: “It is unacceptable that in a time of financial hardship for many in Scotland, the payday loan industry can prey on some of the most vulnerable in our society, getting them into unmanageable debt through aggressive marketing and charging interest rates that can run to thousands of per cent.

“The whole industry must be subject to greater regulation so that we can protect those whose financial situation is desperate enough that they take out these short-term agreements and help them avoid the escalating debt problems that can arise when they run into difficulties paying off the loans. That is why I support a three-tiered approach.

“First, we need to cap the interest rates that payday lenders can charge, much like the authorities have done in many European countries, such as Germany, Japan, Canada and some states in the United States.

“Second we must restrict the ability of payday lenders to “roll over” the debt, wrapping up an outstanding loan in a further credit agreement that can easily escalate and lead to severe repayment problems.

“Thirdly, the industry must be subject to tighter regulation, with its aggressive marketing campaigns and widespread advertising subject to much greater scrutiny.

“The regulation of payday lenders is currently reserved. With independence we will be able to take action to protect consumers and ensure that the practices that are bringing such misery to many of the poorest in Scotland are brought under control.”

Last month, Citizens Advice Scotland reported that staff dealt with 1,200 cases related to payday loans over the past three months.

Meanwhile, Payday loan customers are being urged to “fight back” if they have been mistreated by a lender.

Citizens Advice said that in three-quarters of cases (76 per cent) it has examined, borrowers would have grounds to make an official complaint to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS).