Pocket money: Scots kids flush compared to UK

Halifax's annual pocket money survey showed Scottish kids only lagged behind those in London. Picture: PA

Halifax's annual pocket money survey showed Scottish kids only lagged behind those in London. Picture: PA

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SCOTTISH children are receiving, on average, a higher amount of pocket money than kids in any other UK region outside of London.

Research found in Halifax’s annual pocket money survey showed the overall trend of children receiving a weekly payout from their parents is declining.

Scotland is going against the grain with a 7.5 per cent rise over the past 12 months. That shift is equal to London but actually behind Wales, which increased 11 per cent but still lags behind in terms of monetary average at £6.17.

Scottish kids receive an average of £7.27, only 38p behind London but over £1 wealthier than every other region.

Children in the West Midlands receive the smallest weekly amounts, at £5.45 typically, according to the findings.

Giles Martin, head of Halifax Savings, said: “A fall in the amount of pocket money children receive for the second year running shows the financial pressures that some households are still under, despite the improving economy.

“Nevertheless, parents will be pleased to know that on the whole, children are satisfied with the amount of money they receive.”

Some 1,200 children between eight and 15 years old took part in the survey.

Here are the average amounts of pocket money children receive each week from their parents or guardians, followed by the percentage change compared with 2014:

• Scotland, £7.27, 7.5 per cent

• North East, £6.00, minus 3.5 per cent

• North West, £6.01, minus 6.5 per cent

• Yorkshire and Humberside, £5.84, minus 10 per cent

• East Midlands, £5.64, 2.5 per cent

• West Midlands, £5.45, minus 9 per cent

• East Anglia, £5.63, 9 per cent

• London, £7.65, minus 7.5 per cent

• South East, £6.16, minus 4.5 per cent

• South West, £5.60, 4.8 per cent

• Wales, £6.17, 11 per cent

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