Secular aims

Share this article
0
Have your say

Martin Conroy (Letters, 11 September) claims that the religious merely propose views which can be accepted or rejected.

By law, every local authority education committee in Scotland must have at least three representatives of religious groups who do not earn their seats by democratic election.

These do not merely propose views: they also vote on committee motions. While their views can be rejected by individuals, their votes cannot, and, unlike elected members, they cannot be voted out of power no matter how unpopular.

By law, every state school must hold acts of religious observance, and even children with no religious beliefs are obliged to attend, unless their parents are prepared to consider the all too frequently problematic and under-supported option of removing them.

Secularists do not campaign for the ability to reject religious views. They campaign for the rejection of religious privilege and enforced observance.

Robert Canning

The Scottish Secular 
Society

Broughton Street

Edinburgh