It’s more important for Scotland to stay within the UK than to remain part of EU

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At its referendum on whether to become an independent nation or remain part of the United Kingdom, Scotland voted, by 10 per cent, to remain within the United Kingdom.

At the run-up to the European Union referendum we were threatened by our First Minister that, if we in Scotland voted to “remain” while the overall result was a vote to leave, another referendum on Scottish independence would be likely.

While the United Kingdom voted, by less than 4 per cent, to leave the European Union, Scotland did indeed vote to wish to stay in the EU.

However, I would suggest that many of us who voted to remain in Europe find it far more important to stay within the United Kingdom, especially as England, Wales and Northern Ireland are Scotland’s biggest trading partners, our closest neighbours, friends and family.

The success of the SNP in recent years has largely been due to the fragmentation and disenchantment of many previous Labour voters – in England and Wales, the same people who are blamed for providing the majority to take us out off Europe?

The SNP has been elected to run Scotland, within the United Kingdom, not to take us out of it. The British Government has given the Scottish Parliament greater powers than ever before.

With these heavy responsibilities to the Scottish nation, the SNP should now try to live up to our expectations. They must work, with all other political parties, to unite Scots, and by doing so join with the rest of our Home Nations – as a whole we are the fifth biggest economy in the world – to cement the future of the UK in Europe and the world.

Scotland must play a part in the negotiations to change our relationship with the EU. This gives Nicola Sturgeon and her team the opportunity to show all the people of Scotland her statesmanship and negotiating skills and that there is more to the SNP than just wanting “independence” at any cost.

Andrew Duncan

Guillburn, Kirkton, Dumfries