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Harry D Watson’s rather po-faced contribution (Letters, 21 February) misses the point. Apart from the fact that our English cousins would justify criticising Scottish accents as “just a bit of fun”, which illustrated how touchy Scots are, the main target has been the synthetic accent adopted by the upper and middle classes as confirmation of their superiority.

There is nothing prejudiced in quoting examples of such speech. My “favourites” in this regard are the elongated “bath” and “year” pronounced “yir”.

Scots have every right to 
protest when it is assumed that this stylised pronunciation is 
assumed to be admired or even acceptable here.

Surveys of call centre users have confirmed repeatedly that throughout the UK a Scottish 
accent is very popular.

Is there anything more ridiculous than the bearer of an 
ancient clan title rising to address his clan in a voice like Brian Sewell? But this is what acceptance of the promotion of “superior” speech through public schools has brought us.

Alan Oliver

Battock Road

Brightons

 

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