Leader comment: Swearing? Damned if you do or don’t

Andy Murray has often let rip on court as he pushes his body to the limit.
Andy Murray has often let rip on court as he pushes his body to the limit.
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So it’s official. Scientists have found that foul-mouthed tirades are beneficial. Well, at least to the utterer.

The results may be surprising but new research shows a bout of cursing can increase stamina and strength during physical exertions.

Perhaps this is the secret of success for our own tennis ace Andy Murray. The Wimbledon champion has on occasion had to apologise for his colourful language on the court.

Darned great news, you might think. However, these findings should not be taken as a green light for outbursts of profanity that would make Frankie Boyle or Gordon Ramsay blush – no matter how much you want to improve your performance at the gym.

No. Despite increasing exposure to bad language on television and in films, many people still find swearing deeply offensive.

It’s usually forgivable to let a few choice words slip out when you bash your head or stub your toe, but encouraging more general vulgarity would certainly make our society poorer. It’s acceptable as a means of dealing with pain, but you can have too much of a good thing.