Leader comment: Does Brexit hold a surprise silver lining?

As the use of "plant butchery" expands due to Brexit price rises, banana skins could make excellent soft toys for children

As the use of "plant butchery" expands due to Brexit price rises, banana skins could make excellent soft toys for children

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It seems Brexit may have more far-reaching consequences than we first imagined. According to Restaurant magazine’s predictions for trends in the coming year, rising prices of meat and imports mean restaurants will be looking to keep costs down to ensure a steady stream of diners.

To this end there will be a rise in what it terms “plant butchery” which is where chefs use parts of vegetables and fruits like the skin and roots which are normally thrown away. Now, many cooks will already use some skins and parts for stock or animal feed, but no doubt there will be more extensive uses found as minds are concentrated.

But perhaps we are not going far enough here, It is a truism that necessity is the mother of invention – perhaps the full potential of “plant butchery” has not been envisaged. Inventive entrepreneurs may be able to move beyond food and drink in to a bigger market place.

For instance, could the crackly outer skins of onions be sandwiched in a flat thin layer in a spread out hessian sack, which could then be placed behind doorways or under windows to give voluble warning of any intruders? Can stitched togther banana skins be used for hi-vis cosy winter gloves for cyclists?

Would potato roots dried out and woven together make attractive organic lace curtains? Once the corn has been successfully gnawed from the cobs, are we looking at a new loofah? Would a scooped-out watermelon be a successful and stylish rain hat or would children thank you for peach stones to play marbles with?

It seems there is a possibility of a lean, green, sustainable Brexit bonanza here. Every cloud, as they say.

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