Ben Nevis workers slam climbers over discarded orange peel

Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in Britain. Picture: Contributed
Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in Britain. Picture: Contributed
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ORANGES are making workers on Britain’s highest mountain see red.

A number of climbers and hillwalkers are being criticised for discarding orange and tangerine peel on Ben Nevis in Lochaber.

Climbers are discarding orange peel on the mountain. Picture: Contributed

Climbers are discarding orange peel on the mountain. Picture: Contributed

The problems has been highlighted in a series of images on a blog by a staff member from the Sportscotland Avalanche Information Service (SAIS).

The SAIS Lochaber Blog, posted on Saturday states: “A trail of orange peel on the path to the CIC hut made the walk to work today a bit less pleasant. This takes about 6 months to biodegrade so please take it home!!!!”

There are eight separate photographs showing various sizes and stages of decomposition.

The blog has been supported by comments by followers of the blog.

Sam N said: “Totally agree with you on the orange peel front! Collected a complete orange peel over 4-5 pick up stops this week – please take it home!”

David B added: “Banana skins take just about as long to degrade. Folk don’t seem to get it. Take it home.”

And Gregor said: “Yes and banana skins take longer and wet wipes even longer…should be banned!”

Dropped banana skins have been an issue in the past and in 2009 the John Muir Trust removed more than 1,000 from the summit of Ben Nevis.

READ MORE: Ben Nevis marred by blight of bananas

The Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS), which has raised concerns in the past about litter on Scotland’s hills, has urged walkers not leave food waste and other rubbish.

A spokesman said: “The MCofS applauds the action by organisations carrying out waste collection in areas such as Ben Nevis, which attract large numbers of visitors.

“We will continue to emphasise the need for responsible behaviour in the mountains and for users to comply with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code.”

Last year, separate incidents of littering in the Cairngorms prompted angry responses on social media.

The MCofS shared a YouTube clip of a hill walker describing rubbish left in a remote location as “absolute filth”.

And one of two volunteers who looks after Corrour Bothy in the Lairig Ghru told of taking four hours to sort through and burn waste left there.

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