5 of the most far-flung Scottish pubs around the world

Inside Scoth House, Ulaanbaatar Mongolia. Picture Scotch House

Inside Scoth House, Ulaanbaatar Mongolia. Picture Scotch House

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From South America to rural Russia, Scottish pubs are scattered around the globe.

Our Celtic cousins across the Irish Sea may be well known for spreading their drinking establishments far and wide, but Scottish pubs can also be found in far-flung places around the world.

A celebration of Scottish culture, these bars will make any travelling Scot feel at home.

Pub Macleod, Berezniki, Russia

Close to Russia’s Ural Mountains lies the industrial town of Berezniki known for potash mines, chemical plants and giant sinkholes.

But nestled in this city within Russia’s heartland is the Scottish themed bar, Pub Macleod.

Pub Macleod is in the Russian town of Berezniki. Picture: Pub Macleod

Pub Macleod is in the Russian town of Berezniki. Picture: Pub Macleod

Featuring kilted bar staff, a range of Scotch whiskies and occasionally Highland dancing, Pub Macleod celebrates Scotland and Russia’s often overlooked culture links.

“Real Scots have been here, and posted messages expressing surprise there is a remote pub like this in the Perm Krai region.” bar manager Alisa Khabibulina told the Siberian Times.

She added: “They were pleasantly surprised with the food, drinks, music and gigs at Macleod. On Fridays and Saturdays we have live music, sometimes we host gigs and have Scottish dance performances.

“Whisky is a lot more pleasant to drink than vodka. You can savour the taste and it can be very different.

Scotch House has three floors and range of Scotch whiskies. Picture: Scotch House

Scotch House has three floors and range of Scotch whiskies. Picture: Scotch House

“Perhaps, whisky is partly popular because it’s fashionable, it’s quite new for Russia. It’s a sort of standard for a real man, whether you are a highlander or a businessman.”

READ MORE: Scotland on brink of independence, claims Angus Robertson

Scotch House, Ulaanbataar, Mongolia

In the centre of Mongolia’s capital sits Scotch House which - as the name suggests - is a Scottish themed pub and restaurant.

William Lawson Bar (WL13) is a popular watering hole in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Picture: WL13

William Lawson Bar (WL13) is a popular watering hole in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Picture: WL13

The wood pannelled pub is spread over three floors and offers thirsty visitors around 30 single malt and blended whiskies.

The Lion Rampant adorns the venue’s signs and the walls are plastered with football club banners.

Why is a Scottish pub in Mongolia? Why not!

As one Trip Advisor reviewer points out: “Ulaanbattor has an abundance of Irish pubs, so why not one for the Scots?”

William Lawson’s 13 Bar (WL13), Almaty, Kazakhstan

With Celtic fans heading to Kazakhstan’s capital in the next few days to face FC Astana, they might be tempted to visit the central Asian country’s biggest city, Almaty.

John O'Groats pub in Londrina, Brazil. Picture: John O'Groats pub.

John O'Groats pub in Londrina, Brazil. Picture: John O'Groats pub.

Almaty, the cultural and commercial centre of Kazakhstan, has everything you would expect from a modern metropolis: glitzy shopping malls, throbbing nightlife, large apartments...and a Scottish pub.

William Lawson’s bar - WL13 as it is locally known - is a lively pub with kilted bar staff and a selection of UK beers and scotch.

Canny Man, Hong Kong

Sharing it’s name with the well-known Edinburgh bar, The Canny Man in Hong Kong claims to be the only authentic, traditional Scottish bar in the territory.

Located in the basement of the Wharney Guang Dong Hotel, The Canny Man serves haggis, neeps & tatties, steak & ale pie, mince & tatties, lamb stovies and Scotch pies.

A popular watering hole for Scottish expats, the Canny Man hosted a special event for the 2014 independence referendum so punters could watch the vote count live.

John O’Groats Pub, Londrina, Brazil

Named after the northern tip of mainland Scotland, this bar is over 6,200 miles from its namesake in the southern Brazilian city of Londrina.

A little swankier than your average pub, John O’Groats pub is described as an ‘attraction in itself’ by some TripAdvisor reviewers.

The area where Londrina occupies was originally explored by British settlers in the early 20th century and many of the locals have Scottish and English roots - the city’s name literally means “Little London” in Portugese.

With traditional Celtic bands often playing, visitors can get a taste of Scotland in a tropical climate.

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