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12ft model crocodile stolen from Edinburgh gardens

The fibreglass croc. Picture: Contributed

The fibreglass croc. Picture: Contributed

A TWELVE-FOOT long fibreglass crocodile has been stolen from a park in central Edinburgh.

The sculpture, owned by the National Library of Scotland, was stolen from a water feature in St Andrew Square Gardens. The model animal was in situ to promote a National Libraries exhibition on David Livingstone.

It went missing overnight and staff believe it would have taken two people to carry it away.

Deputy librarian Darryl Mead said: “Davy has proved a popular attraction in the gardens since he moved in three weeks ago. We suspect he may have been taken as a prank late at night and we appeal for his safe return.

“Davy is very much an exhibitionist and took his role in promoting our exhibition very seriously. He was very happy in his pond in the gardens and will be missing it very greatly.”

The sculpture was filled with sand to weigh it down, at around 180kg, but it was poured out before the crocodile was moved out of the garden.

It is thought that the croc was taken some time between 2pm Thursday and 8am Friday. Police believe it was removed via the west gate of the gardens and on to George Street.

Andy Neal, chief executive of Essential Edinburgh which manages the garden, is appealing for the crocodile to be “returned to its natural habitat”.

He said: “It is much happier (in the garden). While we are only concerned to have it back safe and sound, and if we get it back would be content to let the matter rest, the police have been informed and CCTV cameras do operate in the area.”

Pc Caireen Stewart said: “This crocodile is the property of the National Library of Scotland and is very unique. Due to its size, it is believed that someone may have seen something regarding its disappearance. Can any person with information please contact the police on 101.”

Anyone with information on the crocodile’s whereabouts is urged to contact police on 101.

 

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