Mother left ‘scalped’ after go-kart accident

Local police are investigating the accident. Picture: TSPL
Local police are investigating the accident. Picture: TSPL
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A MOTHER is being treated for serious injuries to her head and neck after being “scalped” when her hair got caught in the engine of a go-kart at a Scottish track.

The 48-year-old woman had been at The Garage leisure complex in Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, on a night out with her children when it is understood her hair became caught in the kart she was driving.

She was taken initially to Crosshouse Hospital before being transferred to Glasgow’s Southern General Hospital where she is currently being treated.

East Ayrshire Council is investigating the accident which happened last Wednesday evening.

A police spokeswoman said that they had been alerted to the incident and that the local authority is investigating.

It was reported that woman had been with her children at the time. It is understood that they had been karting and that it was a last-minute decision for the mother to have a go.

The Garage Entertainment Centre in Grange Street declined to comment.

A council spokesman said: “East Ayrshire Council is the health and safety enforcement authority for small businesses within the area.

“Therefore, when the council was notified of this very serious incident, senior officers from Environmental Health services immediately conducted a full investigation of the site.

“The officers are now preparing a report, which will set out the circumstances of the accident, for the procurator-fiscal.

“Our thoughts are with the lady who was injured in this serious accident and with her family at this very difficult time.”

The complex opened in 1994 and offers indoor karting, ten-pin bowling and amusements.

On The Garage’s website the track is described as professionally designed. It adds that the experience is: “Great fun whatever your age or driving experience.”

Carol Blanchard, secretary of the Association of Scottish Karting Clubs, said that the organised sporting side of the industry was heavily regulated. She said that this incident was a “rare type of tragedy” and continued: “This type of accident is very unusual in Scotland.

“Our clubs all have to comply with the national health and safety standards set by the Motor Sports Association (MSA).

“Privately run tracks like these do not have the same nationally-enforced rules.

“There are only four certified tracks in Scotland which are overseen by national guidelines.”

One member of the Scottish karting community said that the MSA safety rules were strict on how a person could wear their hair while driving on a track.

“Long hair is always down inside the back of suit or pinned up inside the helmet,” he said.

“MSA regulations are such that we wouldn’t allow a long-haired person on to a circuit with their hair draped outwith the safety equipment.”

He said that if this was not observed, then an accident was possible.