Glasgow 2014: Smoking to be banned around venues

Games organisers have now revealed the event would be 'smoke-free' as part of moves to create a Scotland free of tobacco in the years to come. Picture: TSPL
Games organisers have now revealed the event would be 'smoke-free' as part of moves to create a Scotland free of tobacco in the years to come. Picture: TSPL
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SMOKING will be banned around sporting venues at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, officials have announced.

Following calls from health campaigners, Games organisers have now revealed the event would be “smoke-free” as part of moves to create a Scotland free of tobacco in the years to come.

It means smoking will not be allowed within venues, in line with the ban on smoking in public places, and be prohibited within site perimeters.

In addition, sales of tobacco will banned at competition venues as well as in the Athletes’ Village.

However, smoking will be allowed within designated areas at the accommodation for athletes. Glasgow 2014 said this fell within World Health Organisation guidelines as to what constitutes a “smoke-free” sporting event.

The organisers said the measures made it the “most progressive smoking policy at any major sporting event held in Scotland”.

But smokers’ lobby group Forest said the move would make visitors feel unwelcome.

Glasgow 2014 chief executive David Grevemberg said: “Glasgow 2014 is supportive and keen to contribute to the Scottish Government’s long-term health ambitions in ­regard to smoking and ­consider our smoke-free policy as an appropriate step towards achieving those ends, while still ensuring the delivery of an outstanding Commonwealth Games.”

The move was applauded by anti-smoking group Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Scotland. Chief executive Sheila Duffy said: “These Games have the potential to inspire young ­people to be the best that they can be. I warmly welcome the announcement that the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games will be smoke-free for children and families.”

But Simon Clark, director of the smokers’ group Forest, said: “The ­London Olympic Games faced ­similar pressure from ­anti-smoking groups and ­politicians but organisers had the courage to reject an ­outright ban on smoking in outdoor ­locations and allow designated smoking areas.”

The policy will be policed by Games staff, with anyone breaking the ban being asked to stop smoking or removed from the venue if they refuse.