Gardening: Get your kids out digging to sow seeds of love

Picture: David Moir
Picture: David Moir
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WITH the school holidays just round the corner, entertaining the kids in the great outdoors couldn’t be easier this summer.

All you need is a little bit of planning, a sprinkle of enthusiasm and a pinch of creativity – the perfect ingredients for a summer of fun in your very own garden.

Dobbies has some simple ideas to help you keep the kids entertained – getting your hands dirty is what it’s all about!

Andrew Gold, plant manager at Dobbies Edinburgh, explains an unused space in your garden doesn’t have to be a wasted space.

“If you have some unused space in the garden, let the kids sow some seeds in the shape of their name or initials. All you need to do is prepare an area of soil and get it ready for sowing. Get them to chalk their name onto the soil and sprinkle some seeds - cress usually works well – sowing quite thickly to achieve good coverage. Gently cover with soil and water well. The cress should grow relatively quickly and the name should appear within a week or so.”

Creating a mini garden is an ideal way to keep kids interested in gardening. Begin planting at the start of the school holidays so they can watch their mini garden flourish.

Andrew continues: “Using a seed tray and items foraged from your garden is all you need to create a mini garden. Start by adding a layer of soil to the bottom of the tray, creating dips and mounds to add interest. Create trees by adding cuttings from bushes, and a pond by burying a small plastic container in the soil and filling it with water. Sow a seed of your choice – simple grass seed often works best – and watch it grow over the holidays. To keep their mini garden in tip top shape, replace the ‘pruned trees’ when they look past their best.”

Encouraging kids to eat more fruit and vegetables doesn’t need to be an uphill battle – not if you help them grow their very own salad bar.

Andrew says: “Grow ready-to-eat salad leaves in a pot, reaping a harvest in just a couple of weeks after sowing the seeds.

“Fill a pot with compost and water it thoroughly. When the compost has settled, sprinkle a cut-and-come-again mix of salad seed over the surface.”