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Former Motherwell footballer Paul McGrillen found dead

FOOTBALLER Paul McGrillen - best known for his spell at SPL club Motherwell - has been found dead in his home, it emerged today.

The 37-year-old's body was discovered at his home in Hamilton last night.

Police said there did not appear to be any suspicious circumstances.

McGrillen was a member of the Motherwell squad that won the Scottish Cup in 1991, although he did not play in the final.

He is the fourth member of the Motherwell squad of the era to have died.

Davie Cooper died, aged 39, in 1995 after suffering a brain haemorrhage while filming a children's coaching show for TV.

Former team mate Phil O'Donnell died after collapsing during a match in 2007 at the age of 35.

And last year former Motherwell midfielder Jamie Dolan died of a heart attack while out jogging at the age of 39.

McGrillen made nearly 100 appearances for Motherwell and scored 13 goals.

A statement on the club website said: "Motherwell Football Club are deeply saddened to learn of the death of former striker Paul McGrillen.

"McGrillen, 37, came through the ranks at Fir Park and emerged in the famous 1991 Scottish Cup winning squad.

"Paul, nicknamed Mowgli by his teammates, was also an active member in the former players club and played in many charity games and events including Dougie Arnott's testimonial and Phil O'Donnell's tribute match.

"Our thoughts are very much with his family and friends at this sad time."

McGrillen also had spells with Falkirk, Airdrie, East Fife, Stirling Albion, Partick Thistle, Clydebank, Stenhousemuir and Stranraer.

He was most recently a striker for junior club Bathgate Thistle.

He played for them against Motherwell in a friendly match last week.

A Strathclyde Police spokeswoman said: "Around 9.40pm on Wednesday 29 July 2009 a 37-year-old man was found dead within his home in Hamilton.

"There would appear to be no suspicious circumstances surrounding the death and a full report will be sent to the procurator fiscal."

 
 
 

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