Wind power provided 95 per cent of Scottish homes’ energy needs in May

Whitelee Windfarm, located on the edge of the UK's largest windfarm, the Visitor Centre is the place to learn all about renewable energy and is the access point to over 130kms of trails for cycling, walking and other outdoor activities. Picture: John Devlin
Whitelee Windfarm, located on the edge of the UK's largest windfarm, the Visitor Centre is the place to learn all about renewable energy and is the access point to over 130kms of trails for cycling, walking and other outdoor activities. Picture: John Devlin
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Environmental groups say last month was an “extraordinary month” for renewables in Scotland, with wind power providing enough energy to power 95 per cent of Scottish households.

WWF Scotland’s analysis of renewables data provided
by WeatherEnergy found wind turbines alone provided 863,494.63 MWh of 
electricity to the National Grid during May.

The figure, environmentalists say, is enough to supply the average electrical needs of 95 per cent of Scottish households. It is also an increase of almost 20 per cent compared with May 2016, when wind energy provided 692,896.1 MWh.

Overall the data showed that wind generated enough output to supply 100 per cent or more of Scottish homes on 11 of the 31 days in May. Scotland’s total electricity consumption, including homes, business and industry, last month was 1,857,566 MWh. Wind power therefore generated the 
equivalent of 46 per cent of Scotland’s entire electricity needs for the month.

Dr Sam Gardner, acting director of WWF Scotland, said: “Despite the disappointment of last week’s announcement that President Trump is to pull the US out of the Paris Agreement, the global 
energy revolution is unstoppable and continues at pace here in Scotland.

“May proved to be another
great month for renewables,
with the wind sector meeting 95 per cent of the 
electricity needs of Scotland’s households.

“On one day in particular, May 15, output from turbines generated enough electricity
to power 190 per cent of homes or 99 per cent of Scotland’s total electricity demand. Month after month, 
renewables play a vital role in cutting carbon emissions and powering the Scottish 
economy.”

Homes fitted with solar PV panels gathered enough sunshine to generate over 100 per cent of the electricity needs of an average household in Aberdeen, Dumfries, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow, 
Inverness and Lerwick in Shetland.

Solar PV data showed the sunniest place was Lerwick, which generated 114 per cent of an average household 
electricity demand.

For those with solar hot water panels, there was enough sunshine to generate more than 90 per cent of an average household’s hot water needs in Aberdeen, Dumfries,
Dundee, Lerwick, Perth, 
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Inverness and Stirling.

Solar power also had an impact on renewables data.