Scots households can do more to help meet recycling targets

Ian Gulland of Zero Waste Scotland with radio DJ Gina McKie at a recycling event in Glasgow. Picture: Lenny Warren
Ian Gulland of Zero Waste Scotland with radio DJ Gina McKie at a recycling event in Glasgow. Picture: Lenny Warren
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Scots should consider placing a small recycling bin in their bathroom to help the country meet its ambitious target of reducing waste, experts claim.

Items such as empty shampoo bottles, aerosol cans and toothpaste boxes can all be recycled, Zero Waste Scotland said.

Scotland’s household recycling rate is almost 43 per cent. The Scottish Government and its partners have pledged to increase this to 70 per cent by 2025.

An EU target is 50 per cent by 2020 - a figure already exceeded by 12 Scottish council areas, including Inverclyde, North Ayrshire, Falkirk and Fife, but not Edinburgh or Glasgow.

Nearly three million tonnes of household waste is sent to landfill sites every year, which costs £150 million in landfill tax.

If individuals recycled just one drinks can each week, Scottish councils would save an estimated £3 million a year;

while putting used teabags in a food waste caddy would save almost £550,000 in landfill tax.

By recycling properly, Scots are “saving money, helping create jobs, conserving energy and protecting Scotland’s natural environment”, said a Zero Waste Scotland spokeswoman.

The Government-funded agency has published a list of “top tips” as part of the UK-wide Recycling Week, which runs until September 18.

As well as bathroom items, Scots are being encouraged to ensure that all plastic bottles - from soft drinks to condiments - are recycled appropriately and not just consigned to the rubbish bin.

“By being the best recyclers we can, we help to preserve Scotland’s environment, tackle climate change and help our economy,” said Zero Waste Scotland chief executive Ian Gulland.

“Recycle Week is a chance for everyone to brush up on recycling and find out how else they can do their bit.”

READ MORE: Scottish councils missing out on millions as recycling wasted