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Scotland’s CO2 footprint on rise after big fall

Blacklaw Wind Farm, near the banks of the River Forth.  Picture: Ian Rutherford

Blacklaw Wind Farm, near the banks of the River Forth. Picture: Ian Rutherford

  • by LYNSEY BEWS
 

SCOTLAND’S carbon footprint got larger in 2010 after falling from its highest level in 2007, ­according to a report.

It grew by 4 per cent between 2009 and 2010 to the equivalent of 82.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2), despite a 19 per cent fall the previous year.

Climate change minister Paul Wheelhouse said the rise can be partly blamed on poor weather during the winter of 2010.

The Scottish Government has published data for Scotland’s carbon footprint, the amount of CO2 pollution generated, ­between 1998 and 2010, for the first time.

The footprint is calculated using estimates of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the spending of residents on goods and services, including those produced abroad, together with emissions directly generated by households.

Mr Wheelhouse said: “While the slight increase in emissions in 2010 is disappointing, it is in part due to the particularly cold weather and the associated increase in emissions from household heating which occurred at the beginning and end of that year.”

Opposition parties said the figures indicate that the government’s targets will be more difficult to meet unless further ­action is taken.

 

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