DCSIMG

Analysis: ‘It is no longer tolerable for education to be left in flux’

Rod Grant is concerned by politicisation of educational debate in Scotland. Picture: Getty

Rod Grant is concerned by politicisation of educational debate in Scotland. Picture: Getty

  • by CHRIS MARSHALL
 

THE headmaster of a Scottish private school has rejected calls to delay the introduction of the new National exams, saying to do so would create more uncertainty.

Rod Grant, head of Clifton Hall School in Edinburgh, said he was increasingly concerned by the “politicisation of educational debate in Scotland”.

A number of private schools have followed East Renfrewshire Council in delaying the introduction of the new National qualifications by a year to give teachers more time to prepare. The new exams, which are part of the Curriculum for Excellence, are being introduced in 2013-14 to replace Standard Grades and Intermediates.

But Mr Grant said: “I am becoming increasingly concerned by the politicisation of educational debate in Scotland.

“The only effect [this] creates is uncertainty for Scotland’s children and parents and that is unacceptable.

“That is why I am nailing my colours to the mast of Curriculum for Excellence, on the timetable set out by the board responsible. It is no longer tolerable for education in Scotland to be left in a state of flux even though there is quite understandable frustration and angst within the teaching profession.

“However, the time has come to stop prevaricating and instead to be getting on with the business in hand. A further delay in CfE’s introduction serves no useful purpose but simply cements current uncertainties and worries and does nothing to improve secondary education in Scotland.

“There is justifiable concern that we still have no idea what the exams will actually look like but the SQA has indicated it will be ready. It is up to the government, Education Scotland and the SQA to ensure that they do not let these pupils down.”

 

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