Dundee street is the ‘least British’ in UK

Just one person of the 99 surveyed in Ballater Place, Dundee, identified themselves as British. Image: Google
Just one person of the 99 surveyed in Ballater Place, Dundee, identified themselves as British. Image: Google
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A quiet residential street in Dundee has a unique claim to fame - it is the least British area in the UK.

Analysis of 2011 census returns found that just one resident in Ballater Place out of 99 respondents identified themselves as British, the lowest percentage in the country.

More than 90 per cent identified themselves as Scottish.

The results were revealed in a study by Electoral Calculus, an independent website which provides analysis and predictions based on survey data and opinion polls.

“Only one of the 99 respondents declared themselves to be British or partly British, giving a nationwide low score of one per cent British, with 91 per cent of people identifying as Scottish,” the report noted.

“The residents are mildly left-of-centre, strongly SNP-supporting, and mostly UK born. The area voted to leave the EU, and has education and economic indicators significantly below average.”

The UK-wide census, held every 10 years, asks respondents to identify their nationality. Options include English, Welsh, Irish, Scottish and British.

“Our chosen key indicator is the proportion of people who chose British or a combination which included British, such as Scottish-British and Welsh-British,” the report explained. “The national average response was 29 per cent of adults felt British or partly British. Generally UK born respondents were more likely to select English, Scottish and Welsh than non-UK born people.”

Ballater Place was built as part of the post-war social housing boom in cities across the UK which saw residents move away from often run-down tenements in central areas to more peripheral estates.

“Given Dundee returned the highest Yes vote in the independence referendum, it is not surprising that the residents of Ballater Place reflect that view and I am very proud to have their support for both the SNP and independence,” Shona Robison, who represents Dundee City East at Holyrood, told The Courier.

In contrast, the locality which feels the most British is a neighbourhood in Oldham, Greater Manchester. The streets around the junction of Chadderton Way, Ruskin Street and Davies Street have 85 per cent of its residents feeling British or partly British.

The report noted the area is mildly left-of-centre and strongly Labour-supporting. It narrowly voted to leave the EU and only 57 per cent of its residents were born in Britain. The overall level of education and economic status is below average.

READ MORE: ‘British identity is key to debate on independence’, says Andrew Wilson