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Heather Mills: I’ll be a Paralympic skier

Heather Mills wants to join the British Paralympic team. Picture: Getty

Heather Mills wants to join the British Paralympic team. Picture: Getty

  • by NATALIE WALKER
 

A DECADE after marrying one of world’s famous men, Heather Mills is hitting the headlines again – after hitting the slopes.

• Heather Mills reveals ambition to compete at 2014 Winter Paralympic Games

• “I basically said, if I’m going to do this, I’m going to do this properly”

And Mills, 44, who had her left leg amputated below the knee following a collision with a police motorbike in 1993, believes she is on track after securing five second-tier race

vic­tories at a number of ski events already this year.

Having appeared on the TV shows Dancing on Ice and the US version of Strictly Come Dancing, Mills yesterday revealed that making the Para­lympic team heading for Russia is her next goal.

She said: “I basically said, if I’m going to do this, I’m going to do this properly.”

Mills revealed she now splits her time between living in the UK – where she sees daughter Beatrice, sharing custody with her former husband, Sir Paul McCartney – and in Austria, where she takes to the slopes.

It has been claimed she has used some of her £24 million divorce settlement from the former Beatle to hire the biggest names in skiing, including previous world speed record holder John Clark, to help her train.

During two years of extreme learning, she has endured a number of broken bones and torn ligaments, including breaking a thumb last year when her prosthetic leg fell off.

Experts are said to be impressed with her speed on the slopes. They have also praised her for refusing to give up, despite her prosthetic leg being frequently “ejected”.

Mills said: “I was a little bit concerned because when I went into training, the leg kept coming off, but now the London Prosthetics Centre has helped design a new one.

“It means it cuts the circulation off for two minutes from the start to the finish of the course. But it actually stays on so, fingers crossed, no more injuries.”

British coaches have urged Mills to enter more slalom races. She said: “It’s going to put my injury risk up even more. I’m quite a good dancer, so eventually I may be able to skirt around the slalom gates.”

The charity campaigner took up the sport while on holiday in Austria a few years ago. Two years ago she took part in trials with the British ski team and

officially joined a 19-strong

development squad last year.

Snowsport UK’s chief executive, Fiona Young, said: “Heather is going to find it tough, but she’s very focused. Also, she’s in a very privileged position in that she doesn’t have to worry about the funding so much.”

Mills is not expected to find out if she makes the team for at least another year.

 
 
 

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