Bio urn allows you to live on as a tree after death

The Bios bio urn combines ashes with the seed of a tree

The Bios bio urn combines ashes with the seed of a tree

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A new “bio urn” has been created to combine your ashes in a biodegradable pot with the seed of a tree.

People can choose whether they want a pine, gingko, maple, oak, ash or beech tree to be planted with their remains.

One woodland burial ground in Scotland said it had received inquiries about those keen to use a bio-urn.

One design - the Bios - has been created by Barcelona-based brothers Gerard and Roger Moline.

A statement said: “ Bios aims to change the way people see death, converting the “end of life” into a transformative process and promoting a return to life through nature.”

READ MORE: Scottish burial reform “lacks ambition”.

The creators of biourns envision a time where cemeteries will be replaced by forests.

The creators of biourns envision a time where cemeteries will be replaced by forests.

It is made using 100 per cent biodegradable materials, the seed is placed at the top of the urn in a growing capsule, where it germinates.

The roots will then enter the lower section of the urn where the ashes “aid the development” of the tree once the vessel has biodegraded.

Sarah Gray, owner of the Binning Memorial Woodland in Tyninghame in East Lothian, said she had received several inquiries from people about the use of bio urns.

Ms Gray had also received calls from people inquiring about another burial method, where the deceased has a tree seed planted in their throat.

People have asked us about the use of bio urns but also about a method of planting a seed in the throat of the deceased.

Sarah Gray, owner of the Binning Memorial Woodland in Tyninghame, East Lothian

Ms Gray said: “People have asked us about the use of bio urns but also about a method of planting a seed in the throat of the deceased who are not going to be cremated.

“However, the issue for us is that our burial ground is all established trees and we are not looking to grow anymore.”

READ MORE: Councils must justify soaring costs of funerals in Scotland, report says.

The urn, which costs around £80 to £100, is said to biodegrade when the roots are strong enough to come into contact with the ashes.

It will need the same care as a standard tree and will required three hours of sunshine a day.

However, Rosie Inman-Cook of the Natural Death Centre described the urns as a “gimmick”.

She said: “Trees hate ashes and the roots will go almost anywhere to avoid ash, which isn’t really ash but made up ground up bones that have not been destroyed during the cremation process. They add too many nutrient to the ground and can have a damaging effect to soil.

“I am really not a fan of bio urns.”

Ms Inman-Cook said that changes to the funeral industry were being driven in Scotland by government work to try and drive down costs of laying a loved one to rest.

She said that at least two funeral directors north of the border, one in Glasgow and one in Aberdeen, were now offering “direct funerals” where family do not take part in the disposal of the body. This was the preferred choice of David Bowie, who was cremated without friends of family present after requesting he did not want a funeral.

Ms Inman-Cook said direct funerals could be conducted at around one third of the price and that the public needed more information on the choices available to them at the end of life.

She urged people to contact the Natural Death Centre on 01962 712 690 for impartial, free advice.

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