Bank’s bid to repossess Derek Riordan’s home on hold

Derek Riordan. Picture: SNS
Derek Riordan. Picture: SNS
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BANKERS today halted a bid to seize a house belonging to former Scotland, Hibs and Celtic striker Derek Riordan over mortgage arrears.

The 32-year-old footballer was not present in Falkirk Sheriff Court to hear a lawyer for the TSB Bank plc ask for an application for possession of the property to be put on hold.

Solicitor Sarah-Jane Kissock, for the bank, asked for the case to be “sisted” - a Scots law term which mean the case is put in abeyance.

It was the second time the case had come up in court.

A fortnight ago Miss Kissock asked for the case to be continued until today and said that Riordan had advised that funds were in place for arrears totaling £25,062.42p to be cleared.

Sheriff Craig Caldwell agreed to the case being sisted.

Court insiders said the fact that the bank had asked for the case to be “sisted” meant that Riordan and the bank had settled.

Court officials declined to confirm the address of the property at the centre of the action, but Riordan owns a luxury home at Castleview, near Airth Castle, Stirlingshire.

The house, at the time valued at £315,000, was hit by a major blaze six years ago.

Riordan was renting the property out at the time.

After the initial hearing of the case earlier this month Riordan’s partner, Susannah Robinson, the mother of Riordan’s five-year old daughter Ruby, declined to comment about the dispute and added to a reporter: “Don’t you dare come to my house again thanks very much, OK?”

In 2011 he went to China where he signed for Chinese Super League club Shaanxi Chan-Ba, but their two-year contract was mutually terminated after just four months. He then signed for St. Johnstone on a short term contract in March 2012. Riordan then signed for Bristol Rovers, but he was released after a three-month deal. He has since had short spells with Alloa Athletic, Brechin City and East Fife.

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