Andy Murray Wimbledon: Dunblane basks in the glory

08/07/2013,  TSPL, Scotsman, Dunblane Murray mania. The town of Dunblane the day after Andy Murray's historic victory at Wimbledon.  L to R, Alec McIntosh, Stewart McClymont and Stuart Gavin  in Bennetts Butchers in Dunblane High street. Pic Ian Rutherford
08/07/2013, TSPL, Scotsman, Dunblane Murray mania. The town of Dunblane the day after Andy Murray's historic victory at Wimbledon. L to R, Alec McIntosh, Stewart McClymont and Stuart Gavin in Bennetts Butchers in Dunblane High street. Pic Ian Rutherford
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Dunblane showed no signs of a Wimbledon hangover yesterday as residents and visitors revelled in the success of the town’s famous son.

On the High Street Andy Murray fans queued to get their picture taken next to the post box painted gold in the wake of last year’s Olympic victory, gleaming again after a fresh lick of paint.

A celebratory cake was displayed outside the local bank, the sponge and icing sculpted into a very good likeness of the champion. Children posed with the creation before it was taken inside out of the strong sunshine which bathed the Stirlingshire town.

Posters congratulating the tennis star hung in almost every shop window and a street sign sat outside the butcher with the words “WIMBLE-DONE!!”

The shop produced special sausages flavoured with strawberry to mark Wimbledon season.

Stewart McClymont, 26, who works at Bennetts the butcher, said: “There’s a real party atmosphere, everyone’s in a great mood.

“The effect that Andy has had on the town is unbelievable. Anywhere you go, on holiday or whatever, when you say you’re from Dunblane people always smile and say ‘that’s where Andy Murray’s from’ and you get a great buzz from that.”

At their home just yards from the local tennis court, Murray’s grandparents Roy Erskine, 81, and Shirley, 79, were bombarded by well-wishers and members of the media as they took stock of his achievements.

The couple have followed his progress since he was a young boy and said his graft and determination had paid off in spectacular style.

Mrs Erskine broke her leg in May and so was unable to go to Wimbledon, but watched the match at home with her husband and their retriever.

“We couldn’t be more proud of him,” she said. “It’s what he’s been trying to achieve all these years, what he’s been working so hard for, and it’s all paid off.

“We follow him every inch of the way. We’ve got two Wimbledon champions in the family now and we’re just delighted.

“It makes you feel so proud and humble for all the right reasons. It gives you such a lift.”

Andy’s brother Jamie won the mixed doubles with Jelena Jankovic in 2007. Andy reached the final last year but was beaten by Roger Federer.

Roy said of his feelings after the match: “There was a sense of relief, a feeling of ‘thank goodness’.

“Especially after Wimbledon last year, and after coming back to get the US Open and the Olympics – this just crowns it.”

Murray’s grandfather said he preferred watching the late night highlights of the match to the live game “because you know the result and you can appreciate the tennis more”.

Their daughter, Murray’s mother Judy, will shortly return to Scotland and they were looking forward to hearing all the details, they said.

The couple have filled nine scrapbooks with cuttings from Murray’s career so far – and that does not include Sunday’s historic win.