DCSIMG

Call to commemorate 1914 Highland rail tragedy

The train left Carrbridge station 18 June, 1914 before crashing at the Baddengorm Bridge. Picture: TSPL

The train left Carrbridge station 18 June, 1914 before crashing at the Baddengorm Bridge. Picture: TSPL

  • by ALISTAIR MUNRO
 

The worst rail disaster in the Highlands – exactly 100 years ago on Wednesday – should be formally commemorated, according to the driver’s grandson.

Five passengers were killed and 10 more wounded when a six-carriage train travelling from Perth to Inverness plunged into a gorge when flooding caused a bridge to collapse just as it was crossing.

The tragedy happened on the afternoon of 18 June, 1914 at the Baddengorm Bridge near Carrbridge.

The first two carriages had made it across the 15-foot span over the burn, but heavy water swell which was at rail level caused the bridge to give way.

The third carriage was left sitting on the bank of the burn, but the next dropped into the water.

The train had left Carrbridge Station, in Strathspey, nine minutes late, at 3.24pm, and it is understood the disaster may have been avoided had it been on time.

In the run-up to Wednesday’s 100th anniversary, Iain Dunbar, whose grandfather Murdo Ross had been driving the train on the day, believes the tragedy should be formally marked.

He said: “It seems right that such a catastrophic even in the Strath’s history it should be recognised.

“I know that a plaque, made from the splinter of one of the crashed carriages, was created.

“It would be nice to dig that out again and place it permanently on the spot where the tragedy occurred so long ago.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page