Theatre review: The Point

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It’s set in Glasgow – but it could be anywhere. This tale of three sex workers is designed to be universal.

Star rating: ****

Venue: The Space @ Surgeon’s Hall

Written by producer and film maker John Stuart, the work had lots of input from its mega-talented cast of Rebecca Burton, Jennifer McErlane and Dionne Frati.

It began life as a monologue, written for Burton, who was sick of being cast as a middle class woman. She was joined by McErlane and Frati, who helped build the piece into a play. The Point was destined to premiere at The Arches in Glasgow just as the venue closed down.

Stuart is so modest about his work you can hardly find his name on the programme – but this is a fantastic production, written in a way which captures the poetic rhythms of working class Glaswegian and Northern Irish speech.

The play tells the stories of three sex workers, sharing instant coffee and chats in between the punters as they work The Point.

Cindy is heavily into drugs but dreams of earning enough to get out and get away. Chargo, who’s Northern Irish, is the youngest, the pickpocket princess, who still believes she’s different. Finally there’s Amber – the nurturing heart of the group – who’s known for being kind to her customers and to the other women who come and go on The Point.

Cindy, Chargo and Amber are rounded and sympathetic characters and stories of their dealings with men, pimps and punters are told very much from the female perspective. The performances are brilliant.

The audience cares deeply as we watch these three women try to hang on to their humanity while dreaming of escape. There is a strong central narrative which makes us wonder which, if any, of these women will get away and find a better life.

This young theatre company is the real thing. They deserve to be getting full houses. Go see.

Until 20 August. Today 6:50pm.

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