Theatre

Theatre

Cabaret & Variety review: Elsie Diamond: The Sensible Undresser

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: In this evocative, amusing and insightful burlesque Bildungsroman, performer Elsie Diamond takes us through her career in cabaret – or rather that of her alter ego, Winnie Sparkletits.

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Theatre review: Elegy for an Echo

Theatre review: Elegy for an Echo

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: In this portentously named play from the excellently named Gin and Chronic Theatre Company, a widower gets too deeply involved with the pharmaceutical company whose drug keeps his memories of his wife alive.

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Theatre review: Cherry

Theatre review: Cherry

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: This fresh and funny show about losing your virginity should shame many professional productions on the Fringe.

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Snowflake, in the case of this production, is not a prejorative term. Picture: Robin Mitchell

Theatre review: Snowflake by Mark Thomson

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Jax is hurtling towards her 21st birthday. (Sorry to be distracted, I was just checking Twitter.) She’s working on her dissertation and can hear her textbooks calling. (Did you see that thing Donald Trump said?)

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Carla Lippis & her band, Vicky Falconer Pritchard & Geoff Crowther. Picture: Alistair Linford

Cabaret & Variety review: Carla Lippis – Cast a Dark Shadow

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Australian cabaret singer Carla Lippis’s debut Fringe show might take place in the up-close-and-personal environs of the Boards barroom but it has a decidedly cinematic sweep.

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Characters live out the stressful, banality of the office life they're willingly trapped in.

Theatrer review: Follow Suit

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: An office tragedy disguised as a clown comedy, this deceptive show is full of surprises.

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Cabaret & Variety review: Tomás Ford: Craptacular

Cabaret & Variety review: Tomás Ford: Craptacular

Edinburgh Festival Fringe:

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Comedy review: Lucy Pearman: Maid of Cabbage

Comedy review: Lucy Pearman: Maid of Cabbage

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: There’s a disconcerting energy about Lucy Pearman, which makes it almost impossible not to laugh. In this wonky gothic creation, which is her first solo show, she has transformed herself into a downtrodden Edwardian maid.

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Theatre review: Between the Crosses

Theatre review: Between the Crosses

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Edgar Huggins always wanted to leave Britain and become a rancher in Australia. Born at the end of the 19th century, he did end up working with horses and leaving the country, although this County Durham farm worker and pit horseman never did make it as far as Australia.

Theatre
Theatre review: Noose Women

Theatre review: Noose Women

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: A very broad satire on reality TV, Noose Women derives most of its comedy from throwing around hilariously bad-taste pitches for shows like Pets at War and Chase the Dwarf, as well as a few insider-y jokes about TV production as a culture (‘That plant was an office gift from Eamonn Holmes!’).

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Children’s show review: Eaten

Children’s show review: Eaten

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: The connection between what goes into us and what comes out of us is lost on many people, not just children, so this scatological show from Mamoru Iriguchi is educational as well as entertaining.

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Theatre review: The Man on the Moor

Theatre review: The Man on the Moor

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Matthew is ten when his father disappears. Now, he’s 31, and attending a support group for “the left behind”, unable to say goodbye, unable to move on.

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Theatre review: The Sleeper

Theatre review: The Sleeper

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: A very British girl in her pyjamas is making a complaint on the night train, deep in the dark, somewhere in Europe. Karina, played by Michelle Fahrenheim, has been spooked by a pair of eyes in her couchette bunk; she demands it be dealt with, though what she’s sneakily hoping for is actually an upgrade to first class.

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Theatre review: The Second Copy: 2045

Theatre review: The Second Copy: 2045

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: One term is esoteric. Another is plain odd. At times, it seems The Second Copy: 2045 is an idea for a show, rather than the show itself.

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Theatre review: Dust

Theatre review: Dust

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: If you want to see a consummate performance, check out Milly Thomas in her own solo show, giving us an out-of-body view of a young woman who has taken her life as an escape from a long-standing eating disorder.

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Magic is in the blood: Marisa Carnesky seeks to show in this wide-ranging look at the medicalised, often demonised cycle of fertility.

Theatre review: Dr Carnesky’s Incredible Bleeding Woman

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Marisa Carnesky has a provocative proposition: all magic is menstrual. Every expression of mysterious power, every ritual that appeals to unknown forces, can trace its origin back to the natural monthly cycle of fertility and feeling that for millennia has been demonised, medicalised and made taboo.

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Theatre review: Part of the Picture

Theatre review: Part of the Picture

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: There is no cheviot or stag, but there’s a lot of black, black oil in this rich evocation of the era of the Piper Alpha disaster by the new Scottish company Bletherbox.

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Theatre review: Hyperthymesia

Theatre review: Hyperthymesia

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: There are a few people in the world who are able to remember every day of their lives. This is due to a condition known as hyperthymesia.

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Reuben Kaye wins over his audience with 'gale-force charisma and a blizzard of bad-taste gags'

Cabaret & Variety review: Reuben Kaye

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Known to London cabaret audiences as a regular compère at the Café de Paris and elsewhere, Australian-born Reuben Kaye brings his first solo show to the Fringe and it’s a doozy.

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Theatre review: Americana Psychobabble

Theatre review: Americana Psychobabble

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: It’s tempting to recommend this howlingly indulgent, but oddly fascinating, one-woman free show by Alexandra Tatarsky, a clownish American who makes Harley Quinn look well-adjusted.

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