What is the new song in the Trainspotting (T2) trailer?

Ewan McGregor in Trainspotting. Picture: Kobal Collection / Figment/Noel Gay/Channel 4 / Longman, Liam
Ewan McGregor in Trainspotting. Picture: Kobal Collection / Figment/Noel Gay/Channel 4 / Longman, Liam
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Trainspotting, the 1996 film adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s cult novel, is regularly cited as one of the UK’s finest cinematic exports.

Ever since it was confirmed a sequel to the original film would be made, fans have naturally began to speculate what songs would make the soundtrack.

The question was partially answered when T2’s first full-length trailer was unveiled.

The instantly recognisble Born Slippy kicks-off the two minute clip, but shortly after makes way for Silk, a song by English alt-rockers Wolf Alice, from their acclaimed debut LP My Love Is Cool.

The band’s bassist, Theo Eillis, posted on social media that he had “a moment” in his mother’s living room when he heard of their inclusion on the new soundtrack.

Memorable performances from the likes of Ewan McGregor and Robert Carlyle, added to deft direction by Danny Boyle in the original Trainspotting, ensured the story of a gang of disaffected drug addicts from North Edinburgh became a critical and commercial smash hit.

Iggy Pop performing at T in the Park in 2000. The vocalist's Lust for Life became the best known track from the Trainspotting soundtrack. Picture: David Moir/TSPL

Iggy Pop performing at T in the Park in 2000. The vocalist's Lust for Life became the best known track from the Trainspotting soundtrack. Picture: David Moir/TSPL

But of equal importance to many fans was the soundtrack.

Although released at the height of Britpop’s popularity, the producers wisely chose a selection of tracks which reflected the mid-1980s setting of the film, rather than opting for recognisble chart hits of the day.

The movie’s classic opening sequence, in which Renton and Spud tear down Princes Street, is perfectly accompanied by the title track from Iggy Pop’s 1977 album, Lust for Life.

It could be argued a direct line can be drawn from Trainspotting’s success to the resurrection of Iggy’s solo career after several years in the doldrums, which eventually led to a high-profile reunion of his original band, The Stooges.

But Lust for Life was just one of the stand-out tracks used in the film.

In a particularly dark scene, Renton can be seen overdosing on heroin while the gentle introduction of Lou Reed’s Perfect Day begins.

Reed, a man who famously wrote a song dedicated to the opiate, was an appropriate choice for the Trainspotting soundtrack.

In one of the film’s lighter moments, as Renton moves into a grim-looking London flat, Pulp’s jaunty Mile End provides an ideal accompaniment.

As Jarvis Cocker croons “Ooh, it’s a mess alright,” Begbie can be seen casually throwing piles of discarded fag packets in the flat’s dingy hallway.

Then there’s the film’s climatic ending, in which Renton walks away from his old life to the thumping bass of Underworld’s Born Slippy .NUXX.

Not every song featured in the film made it on to the original soundtrack. Temptation, a new romantic classic by Heaven 17, was not included - despite playing in iconic nightclub scene.

T2: Trainspotting

The Trainspotting soundtrack swiftly became a success in its own right.

It has been repackaged and reissued several times, and was named the seventh best motion picture soundtrack in history by Vanity Fair in 2007.

Such is its respect, Noel Gallagher of Oasis felt compelled to explain his band’s absence from the soundtrack two decades later, revealing he had presumed the film was actually about trainspotters.