In Full

Culture in Full

Chester Bennington death: Linkin Park set up tribute page

Linkin Park have set up a tribute page for the band’s lead singer, Chester Bennington, following his death.

UK
Bon Scott fronts the band in their 1970s heyday. Picture: Rex Features

AC/DC fan in bid to crack ‘Da Vinci Code of rock’

New light will be shed on the mysterious death of original AC/DC frontman Bon Scott, the author of a new book about the Kirriemuir-born rocker has promised.

Music 2
Ela Orleans

Music review: Ela Orleans

Glasgow-based Polish composer Ela Orleans is one of the most intriguing, diligent talents to have emerged over the last few years, with a restless appetite for creating immersive audio-visual experiences, or “movies for ears” as she succinctly terms her work.

Music
Carol Kidd sings Judy Garland

Music review: Carol Kidd Sings the Music of Judy Garland

If there has been one consistent talking point through this year’s Edinburgh Jazz Festival it has been frustration with its EasyJet method of boarding – making audiences for the tents queue outside, only to be allowed into the venue at the time that the concert is scheduled to start.

Music
Olly Murs has a strong, versatile soul singers voice

Music review: Olly Murs

“Eight years ago I was just a guy working in a call centre in Essex, giving people advice on how to save money on their energy bills…” reminisced Olly Murs towards the end of a slick performance, offering up the rags to riches story of a 21st century pop star.

Music
Kandace Springs looked a bit like a 1990s Scary Spice, but gave 1930s songs a fresh feel

Music review: Kandace Springs

It was impossible not to be won over early on by the Edinburgh Jazz Festival’s 2017 poster girl Kandace Springs. Looking like Scary Spice circa 1997 thanks to the combination of big hair and skin-tight, navel-baring attire – and displaying a similar youthful exuberance – Springs got the packed Spiegeltent crowd onside almost immediately thanks to her energy and charisma. Oh, and her playful sense of humour – much of it directed at her unlucky-in-love bass player.

Music
saxophonist Tommy Smith and his current quartet carry a torch for one of jazzs later great innovators, John Coltrane

Music review: Jazz Centenary Gala Concert Colin Steele Quartet Play the Pearlfishers Tommy Smith Plays Coltrane

A hundred years ago this February past, the Original Dixieland Jass Band from New Orleans entered the New York studios of the Victor Talking Machine Company and delivered their renditions of The Dixie Jass Band One-Step and Livery Stable Blues into the gaping horn of the mechanical wax disc recording machine.

Music
Hamish Stuart was fronting his own six piece band, but did revist Average White Band

Music review: Hamish Stuart Band

It’s difficult to reconcile the terse, gruff Glaswegian voice of the man in the grey suit taking centre-stage with the clear and soulful falsetto which cuts through the room and every listener in it. Yet on some level – a very deep one, to fans of his old band – Hamish Stuart’s vocal style is iconic. Age brings a certain crispness to it, but he still sounds wonderful, both on Average White Band material and on the more traditional jazz styles which which he infused this show.

Music
Milton Jones is Out There, at this year's Edinburgh Fringe Picture: Debra Hurford Brown

Interview: Milton Jones

One of the best exponents of the one-liner in British comedy is on the other end of the phone and I’m braced for a machine gun fire barrage of witty puns and bon mots as Milton Jones limbers up for his Edinburgh Festival run. As well as puns, Jones has a taste for the surreal and the absurd so I’m wondering if I’ll get any sense out of the man responsible for “I’ve got a bad feeling about intuition fees” and “A lot of people like cats. Take the Pope, for example: I read recently that he was a cat-oholic!” or “I went out with this girl the other night, she wore this real slinky number...She looked great going down the stairs.”

News
Nicola Benedetti

Music review: Prom 6: Nicola Benedetti, BBC NOW and Thomas Søndergård

On 20 July, Nicola Benedetti turned 30. She has just been made the youngest recipient for the Queen’s Medal for Music, and she has made it clear that there are other ways too in which she has reached a turning point. Most notably, she is starting to distance herself from the Sistema project which has seen her working with young people from housing estates in the most disadvantaged areas of Scotland. As she hinted to an interviewer last week, the problem with this scheme is that social-work aims can trump musical ones, and she’s not even sure that the former are achieving the hoped-for results.

Music
Kandace Springs

Edinburgh Jazz Festival reviews: Kandace Springs | Georgia Cecile

It was impossible not to be won over early on by the Edinburgh Jazz Festival’s 2017 poster girl Kandace Springs. Looking like Scary Spice circa 1997 thanks to the combination of big hair and skin-tight, navel-baring attire – and displaying a similar youthful exuberance – Springs got the packed Spiegeltent crowd onside almost immediately thanks to her energy and charisma. Oh, and her playful sense of humour – much of it directed at her unlucky-in-love bass player.

Music
Colin Steele

Edinburgh Jazz Festival reviews: Jazz Centenary Gala | Colin Steele Quartet | Tommy Smith

A hundred years ago this February past, the Original Dixieland Jass Band from New Orleans entered the New York studios of the Victor Talking Machine Company and delivered their renditions of The Dixie Jass Band One-Step and Livery Stable Blues into the gaping horn of the mechanical wax disc recording machine.

Music
Edinburgh Bus Station PIC: Phil Wilkinson

Book review: Riding Route 94, by David McKie

I love the idea of random journeys. Many of our daily trips are commutes made monotonous by their over-familiarity, while longer forays, such as to visit family or reach a favourite holiday destination, also often involve habitual routes. To break the mould, you could search a map for an intriguing-looking road to follow or change your route on the spur of the moment. However, David McKie has taken random travel to an entirely different level, deciding to tour Britain by going only where he can hop on a 94 bus.

Books
Matt Haig

Book review: How To Stop Time, by Matt Haig

Although I have enjoyed novels by Matt Haig in the past, I would have to say, hand on heart, I have never admired them. He has a remarkable fluency to his prose, a capacity to conjure curious conceits, and boldly uses speculative forms to deal with real world issues. Yet, somehow, his work leaves me cold. With How To Stop Time, I think I now know why.

Books
Detail of work by Morris Meredith Williams

Book review: An Artist’s War, by Phyllida Shaw

The letters and sketches of a husband and wife duo form as vivid a memorial of the Great War as their bronze reliefs, discovers Duncan Macmillan

Books
Sarah Hall

Book review: Madame Zero, by Sarah Hall

Sarah Hall has said that “short stories are a reminder that you never get to the bottom of things”. You might interpret this in more ways than one, but one might be that the short story – at least the kind she writes – is a light directed briefly into the mysterious darkness of other people’s lives. Explanations may be offered for what is revealed, but they are always insufficient. Sometimes no explanation is possible. So, for example, in “Mrs Fox”, a young woman, walking with her husband in the woods metamorphoses before his eyes into a fox. He takes her home, protects her, drives their cleaning woman away, but cannot keep her. The call of the wild is too strong. Almost a hundred years ago, David Garnett, wrote a charming, but whimsical, short novel “Lady Into Fox”, which was a great success. Hall’s story is darker; charm isn’t her business. It’s well done, matter-of-fact, yet at the same time disturbing.

Books
Visual Effects Supervisor Dan Lemmon, left, and Director Matt Reeves on the set of Twentieth Century Fox's War for the Planet of the Apes.

Interview: War for the Planet of the Apes director Matt Reeves

As a lifelong fan of Planet of the Apes, director Matt Reeves tells Alistair Harkness that he jumped at the chance to take over a saga which forces its audience to experience life through the emotions of an ape

Film
Baba Brinkman is returning to the Edinburgh Fringe this year. Picture: Contributed

Fringe interview: Baba Brinkman on the Canadian Fringe circuit

Promoted by the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. In a regular series of interviews to mark World Fringe Day, acts performing at this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe share their experiences of other fringes around the world. This week: rapper Baba Brinkman tells Jay Richardson about his experiences on the Canadian Fringe circuit.

Theatre
Dean Owens PIC: Neilson Hubbard

Preview: The Southern Fried Festival in Perth

Southern Fried takes a turn north as Perth’s festival of Americana widens its net

Music
Shows touring Scotland in the Autumn include Jason and the Argonauts PIC: Douglas McBride

Joyce McMillan on Theatre in Schools Scotland

A new project sees companies join forces to bring the magic of drama to youngsters across the country

Theatre
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