The Scotsman Fringe First awards 2016 winners annouced

Counting Sheep

Counting Sheep

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The Scotsman’s Fringe Firsts recognise outstanding new writing premiered at the festival – here are our first winners of 2016.

Established in 1973, the Scotsman’s Fringe Firsts are the longest-running theatre prizes at the festival, and are awarded to outstanding new writing premiered at the Fringe.

The  Interference

The Interference

Winners are announced each Friday. This year our judging panel consists of Joyce McMillan, Jackie McGlone, Mark Fisher, Susan Mansfield, Sally Stott, Fiona Shepherd and David Pollock.

Many congratulations to all the winners!

Counting Sheep

A “guerrilla folk opera” of astonishing vigour, movement and scale, Mark and Marichka Marczyk’s show at Summerhall features a cast of 12 and music, song and dance in the Ukrainian choral traditional, in a recreation of anti-government protests in Kiev’s main square.

Expensive Shit

Expensive Shit

The Interference

Lynda Radley’s new play, showing as C Venues, is about a date rape by a popular footballer on a US University campus. It’s a story familiar from campaigns against rape culture and Radley’s writing is formidable in its ear for the chilling parallels between the brutal language of the sports field and frightening attitudes towards women.

Expensive Shit

Full of raging female energy, Adura Onashile’s new show for the Traverse links two very different cultures- Nigeria in the 1970s and the UK today - with a single, patriarchal badge of shame. It’s also a breathtaking theatrical glimpse of the truth that knowledge is power.

Angel by Henry Naylor

Angel by Henry Naylor

Angel

Showing at Guilded Balloon, the third play in Henry Naylor’s Middle-eastern trilogy is a simple but devastating one hour monologue delivered by a young Kurdish woman who grew up in Syria before the war.

World Without Us

The latest show by Belgian mavericks Ontroerend Goed, at Summerhall, is a visionary poem that imagines a world in which humans have vanished, as buildings begin to fall and the world returns to a rich if strangely mutated landscape patrolled by great beasts and towering vegetation.

World Without Us

World Without Us

Heads up

A blazing hour-long solo poem, Kieran Hurley’s new Summerhall show imagines the coming of the end of the world through the eyes of a series of very different characters. It confirms his status as on of British theatre’s most powerful new writers.

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