Reviews

Festival Reviews

Theatre review: Seagulls

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: The Volcano Theatre Company of Swansea can always be relied on to perform as if an explosive display of energy - accompanied by as much aggressive yelling, loud banging and vivid visual imagery as possible - is a better option than subtlety of any sort.

Edinburgh festivals
Comedy review: Jimmy McGhie’s Tribal Gathering

Comedy review: Jimmy McGhie’s Tribal Gathering

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: For anyone who hasn’t seen one in Edinburgh yet, this is a stand-up comedy show.

Edinburgh festivals
Comedy review: Johnny White Really-Really: Pigeons

Comedy review: Johnny White Really-Really: Pigeons

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Embracing anti-comedy, a character in one of his dreamlike fugues asking “are you joking? Is it going to turn into a joke?”, Johnny White likes to play with tension and anti-climax, opening with a long routine about the actor James Nesbitt irking him in various scenarios.

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Comedy review: Desiree Burch: Unf*ckable

Comedy review: Desiree Burch: Unf*ckable

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Desiree Burch has a pretty unique take on the power relations of sex, as despite having been a virgin, she used to work as a dominatrix.

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Comedy review: Nick Coyle: Queen of Wolves

Comedy review: Nick Coyle: Queen of Wolves

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Nick Coyle has always had a propensity for the twisted and a flair for the dramatic.

Edinburgh festivals
Theatre review: Femage a Trois

Theatre review: Femage a Trois

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Women are firmly centre-stage in these three short plays about female experience by Loquitur, a theatre company specialising in new writing.

Edinburgh festivals
Theatre review: Baba Brinkman’s Rap Guide To Consciousness

Theatre review: Baba Brinkman’s Rap Guide To Consciousness

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: White men rapping are a fairly unremarkable species ever since Eminem arrived two decades ago, but Canadian artist Dirk “Baba” Brinkman Jr takes the “unlikely musician” factor up a notch.

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Theatre review: Spring Awakening: A Reimagining

Theatre review: Spring Awakening: A Reimagining

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: The classic tale of teenage sexuality is given a Fifty Shades-style revamp by young company, Mixtape, who struggle to find a clear enough angle to justify transporting it into the 21st century.

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Theatre review: Edgar and Me

Theatre review: Edgar and Me

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: For the past six years Charlotte Blackburn has been writing to Edgar, a man on death row in the US.

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Theatre review: Locker Room Talk | Manwatching

Theatre review: Locker Room Talk | Manwatching

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Following the huge success of his latest show Letters To Morrissey, there must have been more than a few Gary McNair fans queueing on Monday for the only two performances of his other 2017 show, Locker Room Talk; but if so, they would have found themselves facing an experience very different from McNair’s recent genial poetic monologues.

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Chamber Pot Opera

Musicals & Opera review: Chamber Pot Opera

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: The bathrooms are where the drama happens on a night out, where the tears are shed, the secret text messages received, the plots hatched.

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Comedy review: Tom Lucy: Needs to Stop Showing Off in Front of His Friends

Comedy review: Tom Lucy: Needs to Stop Showing Off in Front of His Friends

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Tour support for several big-name acts and signed to one of the most powerful comedy agencies, at just 21 Tom Lucy’s potential is already self-evident.

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Theatre review: Out of Love

Theatre review: Out of Love

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Spanning 30 years, this pocket epic tracks the intertwined stories of two female best friends growing up in the north of England, the chaotically confident Grace and the more balanced, cautious Lorna.

Edinburgh festivals
Comedy review: The Long, Miserable Journey to Happiness

Comedy review: The Long, Miserable Journey to Happiness

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: This is such a sweet show. There are precious few words as Paul Valenti, a chubby little waistcoated man in a Stan Laurel hat, measures our smiles and leads us along his road to happiness.

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Comedy review: Mae Martin: Dope

Comedy review: Mae Martin: Dope

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Imparted by an increasingly mature, accomplished storyteller, Dope is essentially Mae Martin’s origins story, and a richly absorbing one at that.

Edinburgh festivals
Comedy review: Tom Neenan: Attenborough

Comedy review: Tom Neenan: Attenborough

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Nakedly acknowledging both its three-star solidity with a casual gag and its debt to Britain’s greatest living naturalist in terms of shifting tickets with his name, Tom Neenan’s latest hour is a slight, amusing, none-too-original but enjoyable enough afternoon diversion.

Edinburgh festivals
Theatre review: #Vile: The Untimely Demise of a Manufactured Pop Star

Theatre review: #Vile: The Untimely Demise of a Manufactured Pop Star

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Work about the relentless, pervasive ubiquity of attention-grabbing celebrities have been almost as popular as the procession of low-rent icons who have emerged from Big Brother onwards.

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When We Ran (Pleasance)

Theatre review: When We Ran

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Iris and Rosa have lived all their lives in the commune of Ela. Rural and entirely insular, it’s an idyllic place to be a child, but as the girls grow into adolescents, they become aware of another side to the story: long hours of manual labour; rules, curfews and inspections.

Edinburgh festivals
Comedy review: Steen Raskopoulos – The Coolest Kid in Competitive Chess

Comedy review: Steen Raskopoulos – The Coolest Kid in Competitive Chess

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Though his show ends with the cliché of the desperate lover dashing to the airport to try to win back his beloved, there’s nothing remotely predictable about Steen Raskopoulos’s latest hour, save for the bellylaughs it elicits with his tried and tested but unique brand of audience participation.

Edinburgh festivals
Ivonia Princess of Burgundia

Theatre review: Ivona Princess Of Burgundia

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: The story of Princess Ivona is a very strange tale indeed, based on the mock-Shakespearean 1938 drama of the same name by the great Polish absurdist Wiltold Gombrowicz; and it forms the basis for what is, in its quiet way, one of the most unexpected shows on this year’s fringe.

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