Reviews

Festival Reviews

Dance review: Blak Whyte Gray

Edinburgh Interantional Festival: There are moments of synchronised movement in Blak Whyte Gray that thrill you to the core, jumps and tumbles that excite, and popping, locking and krump so precise it hits every beat accompanying it.

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Music review: Benjamin Appl & Pavel Kolesnikov

Music review: Benjamin Appl & Pavel Kolesnikov

Edinburgh International Festival: It’s a risky game that German singer Benjamin Appl is playing.

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Theatre review: The Room at the Top of the House

Theatre review: The Room at the Top of the House

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: “Has anyone seen my keys?” “Where’s my mascara?” The cacophony of everyday dialogue fills an ever-moving, energetic family household.

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Theatre review: Birthday Cake

Theatre review: Birthday Cake

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: It feels unfair to go to town on a piece which features some strong youth performers amid its 15-strong cast, as well as some nice choreography and staging.

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Delicious dialogue and fittingly arch performances bring Janne Teller's lauded novel to life.

Theatre review: Nothing

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: “It’s all a waste of time,” a boy shouts from the top of a plum tree. “In a few years you’ll all be dead.”

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Theatre review: A Robot In Human Skin

Theatre review: A Robot In Human Skin

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: On last year’s Fringe, Nicole Henriksen exposed herself physically in Makin’ It Rain, a show about her stint as a stripper and the feminist questions the job raised.

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Theatre review: Queen of the F*cking World

Theatre review: Queen of the F*cking World

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: It’s a big title to live up to – but Marysia Trembecka certainly looks ready to give it a go, with a her bass guitar, silver dress and big, pouffy rock star hair.

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Theatre review: Borders by Henry Naylor

Theatre review: Borders by Henry Naylor

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Henry Naylor’s trilogy about conflict in the Middle East may have been completed last year, with the heart-stopping solo drama Angel about the Kurdish female fighters of northern Syria, but in his latest show he returns to Syria, and how we in the West view conflict and disaster through lenses provided for us by Western cameramen and photographers.

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Comedy review: Twonkey’s Christmas in the Jungle

Comedy review: Twonkey’s Christmas in the Jungle

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: As I listen to a song asking the intriguing question “What’s In My Marmalade?” while watching two Spandex Tree Hoppers being dangled by the Flying Tailor over our heads, I have a moment of clarity.

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Theatre review: Replay

Theatre review: Replay

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: She’s a cool, calm and competent police officer with a troubled past who finds it difficult to show her emotions: the kind of character who wouldn’t be out of place in a BBC drama that thinks it’s being innovative for casting a women in a lead role.

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Theatre review: Dirty Bitches

Theatre review: Dirty Bitches

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: There’s something charming and distinctive about a three-hander which explores the sex lives of the elderly through a brassy prostitute, a mild-mannered female escort and the man who unites them.

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Theatre review: Sugar Baby

Theatre review: Sugar Baby

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Holly-Rose Clegg is a cool, charismatic young actor who, if the world works properly, is going to be really successful.

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Theatre review: Dreaming Amidst Thorns

Theatre review: Dreaming Amidst Thorns

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: On the one hand, Kaleidoscope Theatre’s family-friendly fairy tale mash-up is commendable for being as well-intentioned as they come, providing an exciting opportunity for children with Down’s Syndrome to tread the boards and raising money for charity in the process.

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Cabaret & Variety review: Anya Anastasia: Rogue Romantic

Cabaret & Variety review: Anya Anastasia: Rogue Romantic

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: First rule of the Fringe (or, indeed, life): never mess with a woman who can do a handstand across your lap while maintaining perfect pitch.

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The Jungle Girl. Picture:  David Monteith-Hodge

Theatre review: Secret Life Of Humans | Lilith: The Jungle Girl

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: It’s not the most obvious theme in Edinburgh this year but still, it weaves its way through the official Festival and Fringe, from the EIF production of Rhinoceros on down.

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Theatre review: How To Act

Theatre review: How To Act

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Of all the shows on this year’s Fringe about post-colonial encounters and attitudes, none will strike closer to home – for the British theatre community assembled in Edinburgh – than Graham Eatough’s new two-handed drama for the National Theatre of Scotland, playing at Summerhall.

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Theatre review: Workshy

Theatre review: Workshy

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: You can just imagine the Arts Council symposium. It’d be called “What If Live Art Falls Into The Wrong Hands?” and the main topic of discussion would be Katy Baird.

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Comedy review: John Kearns: Don’t Worry They’re Here

Comedy review: John Kearns: Don’t Worry They’re Here

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Despite being a recent Edinburgh Comedy Award-winner, John Kearns still feels a need to qualify expectations, to begin by recalling the support slot he played for Russell Kane in Kent last year, featuring 800 people staring at him in oppressive silence.

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Australian comic

Bec Hill's show will leave you with a smile on your face. Picture: Steve Ullathorne

Comedy review: Bec Hill: Out of Order

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Australian comic Bec Hill is a multi-coloured ray of eternal sunshine. In a world of pain and darkness, her total lack of cynicism is refreshing. It helps that she’s funny and charming with it, of course.

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Musicals & Opera: Just Like the Movies

Musicals & Opera: Just Like the Movies

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Edinburgh girl Mary (Lucy Duffy) has conquered every style of dance she’s tackled. She needs a new challenge and Scottish Country Dancing could be it.

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