Ashley Storrie: ‘White boys’ overrun Edinburgh Festival Fringe

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Edinburgh Fringe is in on the brink of a revolt because it is becoming too exclusive and mainstream, some performers have claimed.

A group of comedians have joined forces to speak out about the festival.
Comedian Ashley Storrie said the festival is becoming overrun with “white boys in skinny jeans and posh voices who want to come here and then get a show of on E4”.

Comedian Ashley Storrie. Picture: Steve Sllathorne.

Comedian Ashley Storrie. Picture: Steve Sllathorne.

Ashley Storrie on the ‘world buffet of entertainment’

Stand-up Lenny Sherman, 42, from London, said he applied for time but did not even get a response from organisers.

The so-called “Whitehallisation”of the arts festival - dubbed after renowned posh boy Jack Whitehall - has led to established acts dominating the scene and pushing up-and-coming talent out to the fringe of the fringe.

One act had to spend £3,000 and book time off work to attend the festival – only to be told he wasn’t acknowledged enough to perform.

Lenny Sherman, 42, from London, said he applied for time but didn’t even get a response from organisers.

Fringe organisers have emphasised that the event is an open access festival where anyone can perform.

But Ms Storrie, who is the daughter of comic Janey Godley, added: “People see the fringe as a platform to get famous. It’s not. Stop coming.”

TV producer Victor Lewis Smith has also weighed in on the argument, saying: “In recent years, mainstream broadcasters seem to have given up on investing in edgy and boundary-pushing satire.

Chris McGlade, who played a major part in Billy Elliot, said: “To me the Edinburgh Fringe is just a money making mafia.”