{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/world-in-grip-of-widespread-ransomware-cyber-attack-1-4488446","id":"1.4488446","articleHeadline": "World in grip of widespread ‘ransomware’ cyber attack","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498635844000 ,"articleLead": "

Widespread disruption has hit organisations across the world in the second major cyber attack to strike in as many months.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488445.1498635842!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Organisations around the world have been hit by the second major cyber attack in as many months. Picture: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Big business including advertising giant WPP and law firm DLA Piper were affected, while government offices in eastern Europe were also hit.

A hospital in the US and pharmaceutical company Merck also fell victim, and Cadbury owner Mondelez International said it had experienced a “global IT outage” which it was working to resolve.

Government officials reported major disruption to the power grid, banks and government offices in Ukraine, where news of the attack first emerged on Tuesday.

The latest virus comes just weeks after ransomware – the name given to programmes that hold data hostage by scrambling it until a payment is made – downed systems across the globe, including the NHS in the UK.

• READ MORE: Global cyber attack strikes heart of NHS in Scotland

More than 200,000 victims in around 150 countries were infected by the WannaCry or Wanna Decryptor ransomware, which originated in the UK and Spain last month, before spreading globally.

The National Cyber Security Centre, part of intelligence agency GCHQ, said it was monitoring the current “global ransomware incident”.

WPP, the world’s biggest advertising business, confirmed it had been hit, while DLA Piper has taken its email system down as a preventative measure.

Russia’s Rosneft energy company also reported being hit, as did shipping company AP Moller-Maersk, which said every branch of its business was affected.

Ukrainian deputy prime minister Pavlo Rozenko posted a picture of a darkened computer screen on Twitter, saying the computer system at the government’s headquarters had been shut down.

In reference to the attack, the State Agency of Ukraine on Exclusion Zone Management said Chernobyl’s radiation monitoring system has been switched to manual and is operating normally.

An email address posted at the bottom of ransom demands was blocked by Berlin-based host Posteo, which said it had contacted German authorities after realising the account was associated with the malware.

• READ MORE: HMS Queen Elizabeth ‘not vulnerable’ to cyber attack

The current ransomware is known as GoldenEye, according to Bogdan Botezatu, a senior e-threat analyst at Bitdefender.

Victims of the malware are asked to pay a $300 (£234) ransom after their hard drive is encrypted, crashing their computer.

Botezatu, who warned against paying any money, said that the malware operators received 27 payments totalling almost $7,000 in digital currency in around five hours.

He said: “I would strongly advise against paying the ransom, because this keeps this vicious circle in which hackers get enough money to fuel even more complex malware and this is why ransomware has become so popular in just three years.

“It’s a billion-dollar business and the more customers they have, the more advanced the future ransomware attacks will be.”

The ransomware is believed to be spreading from one computer to another using the exploit EternalBlue, which was also used in the WannaCry attack.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Botezatu said GoldenEye, a more advanced version of the malware Petya, may have a number of exploits, meaning even those who patched their systems against EternalBlue after the WannaCry attack may still be vulnerable to the latest hack.

He said experts will work on trying to find a flaw in the ransomware in order to create a decryption tool, but there is no guarantee victims will get their information back.

Following last month’s WannaCry incident some of the blame was directed at US intelligence agencies the CIA and the National Security Agency (NSA) who were accused of “stockpiling” software code which could be exploited by hackers.

Dr David Day, a senior lecturer in cyber security at Sheffield Hallam University, said he believed the latest attack is the “tip of the iceberg” and said he is frustrated at how it has been able to unfold.

He said: “Basically what they (the NSA) have done is they have created something which can be used as a weapon, and that weapon has been stolen and that weapon is now being used. And I think it underlines the whole need for debate over privacy versus security.

“The NSA will argue that the tool was developed with a need to ensure privacy, but actually what it’s being used for is a weapon against security.”

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" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Russell Jackson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488445.1498635842!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488445.1498635842!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Organisations around the world have been hit by the second major cyber attack in as many months. Picture: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Organisations around the world have been hit by the second major cyber attack in as many months. Picture: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488445.1498635842!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/celebrity/michael-nyqvist-star-of-girl-with-the-dragon-tattoo-dies-at-56-1-4488407","id":"1.4488407","articleHeadline": "Michael Nyqvist, star of Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, dies at 56","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498633645000 ,"articleLead": "

Michael Nyqvist, the star of the original The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo films, has died at the age of 56, his family has announced.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488405.1498633639!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Michael Nyqvist, who starred in the original Girl With The Dragon Tattoo films, has died aged 56. Picture: Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The Swedish star, also known for playing villains in John Wick and Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, died surrounded by his family after battling lung cancer for a year, a representative said.

In a statement on behalf of his family on Tuesday, he was paid tribute to as “one of Sweden’s most respected and accomplished actors”.

According to Variety, the statement added: “Michael’s joy and passion were infectious to those who knew and loved him.

Scotsman Lifestyle: Travel, outdoors and culture

“His charm and charisma were undeniable, and his love for the arts was felt by all who had the pleasure of working with him.”

Nyqvist played the lead role of Mikael Blomkvist in the trilogy of films adapted from Stieg Larsson’s books. Daniel Craig would revive the role in the American adaptation of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.

Nyqvist played a villain opposite Keanu Reeves in John Wick and was Tom Cruise’s nemesis in the 2011 Mission: Impossible film.

He was born in Stockholm to Swedish and Italian parents but they put him in an orphanage before he was adopted as a baby, according to his website.

His wife Catharina and their children Ellen and Arthur survive him, according to reports.

Click here for more international news from The Scotsman

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488405.1498633639!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488405.1498633639!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Michael Nyqvist, who starred in the original Girl With The Dragon Tattoo films, has died aged 56. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Michael Nyqvist, who starred in the original Girl With The Dragon Tattoo films, has died aged 56. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488405.1498633639!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488406.1498633643!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488406.1498633643!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Nyqvist, right, with Noomi Rapace, in a scene from The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nyqvist, right, with Noomi Rapace, in a scene from The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488406.1498633643!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/michael-mckean-yemen-a-war-that-s-slipped-under-the-radar-1-4486703","id":"1.4486703","articleHeadline": "Michael McKean: Yemen - a war that’s slipped under the radar","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498543213000 ,"articleLead": "

The world’s largest ­humanitarian disaster is unfolding, largely away from the gaze of the world’s media, in a country which most people may remember as the setting of a ­prize-winning novel and Ewan McGregor romantic comedy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps"} ,"articleBody": "

Yemen, an Arab country of 26 million people, is a far cry from the country portrayed in the fantastical Salmon Fishing in the Yemen and for more than two years has been gripped by a devastating civil war.

Innocent civilians are bearing the brunt of the war. Families have been displaced and torn apart, schools closed, ­children are prisoners in their homes. Cholera is rife with a new child infected every 35 seconds. Increasingly, Yemen has become isolated with food imports drying up and a hunger crisis engulfing the country. UN figures estimate that 17 million people are struggling to find enough to eat.

Within that, seven million ­Yemenis are on the brink of ­famine. A population ­larger than that of Scotland, is reducing food ­consumption to such ­levels that people are perishing from hunger. Two million children are acutely malnourished, with a child dying every ten minutes from preventable diseases. Yet the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan for Yemen remains less than a third funded.

Before the Arab Spring protests that shook the Middle East in 2011, Yemen was already the Arab world’s poorest country. An agricultural economy with little mass production or valuable natural resources, Yemenis lived as they have for ­decades, subsisting on mountainous and dry lands. But the protests failed to usher in a political transition that was ­supposed to bring stability. In 2015, the situation collapsed into a civil war between forces loyal to President Hadi and those allied to the Houthi rebel movement, both of which claim to constitute the ­Yemen government.

Edinburgh-based Mercy Corps has been working in Yemen since 2010. Before the war, we focussed on helping Yemeni communities build sustainable livelihoods, like supporting sesame farmers to improve production and access markets. But now, more than two years into the war, we’re just trying to keep ­families alive. We ­provide vouchers so that ­people can buy food, water and ­other emergency supplies, which also helps local traders to stay in business, receive valuable income and continue to provide jobs.

But the needs go far beyond food. A cholera outbreak has affected more than 120,000 people in the past six weeks. Mercy Corps teams are working tirelessly to stem its spread by providing water filters, chlorination tablets and hygiene kits, as well as prevention education, to 350,000 people.

What the McGregor film did do well was portray the natural beauty of Yemen’s landscape and the warmth of the ­Yemeni people who, right now, are ­living through a catastrophe. ­In my 20 years of ­working in the humanitarian ­sector, I do not believe we have faced a greater test.

Michael McKean is director of ­programmes, Mercy Corps Europe. Mercy Corps is a leading global organisation headquartered in ­Edinburgh and working in more than 40 ­countries.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/party-boat-sinks-leaving-at-least-six-dead-in-colombia-1-4487099","id":"1.4487099","articleHeadline": "Party boat sinks leaving at least six dead in Colombia","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498500798000 ,"articleLead": "

Scuba divers yesterday continued searching for bodies in a reservoir near the Colombian city of Medellin where a tourist boat packed with more than 150 passengers for the holiday weekend capsized, leaving at least six people dead and 15 missing.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487098.1498500796!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A tourist boat packed with passengers for the holiday weekend sunk, leaving at least six people dead and 15 missing. Picture: Juan Quiroz via AP"} ,"articleBody": "

Rescuers including firefighters and air force pilots in helicopters searched for survivors at the Guatape reservoir where El Almirante ferry sank. A flotilla of recreational boats and jet skis had rushed to the scene, pulling people from the boat as it went down and avoiding an even deadlier tragedy.

Dramatic videos circulating on social media show the turquoise-and-yellow-trimmed party boat rocking back and forth as people crawled down from a fourth-floor roof as it sank in a matter of minutes.

Survivors described hearing a loud explosion near the men’s bathroom that knocked out power for a few minutes after the boat began its cruise around the giant lake. As water flooded on board, pressure built and people were sucked under by the sinking ship.

“Those on the first and second floors sank immediately,” survivor Lorena Salazar told local media. “All we could do was scream and call for help…it was completely chaotic.”

In the absence of a passenger list, authorities have been relying on family numbers and survivors to report their whereabouts. Overnight they reduced to 15 the number of people missing, down from an earlier count of twice that number. Of the 134 people who survived the crash, three remain hospitalised but are out of danger, said Margarita Moncada, the head of the disaster relief agency in Antioquia state.

Eyewitness Louisa Murphy said: “We saw things flying off the side of the boat. And within, I think, probably about 20 seconds the boat had sort of sunk with just the top deck visible.”

A group of 25 scuba divers were forced to suspend their search overnight due to a lightning storm. But they resumed their work before dawn yesterday working in hour-long shifts, looking to sweep for trapped bodies in the frigid, algae-filled waters around the wreckage at a depth of over 30 meters. Ms Moncada said the hardest part for scuba divers is to safely search the area around the first floor of the boat.

It’s unclear at this point what caused the boat to sink.

Some survivors and people who witnessed the tragedy from the nearby shore said the boat appeared to be overloaded. But President Juan Manuel Santos, who traveled to Guatape to oversee the search efforts, said it was sailing well below capacity. None of the passengers was wearing a life jacket.

“Nobody really knows what happened,” said President Santos, adding that naval officials were brought in to carry out an investigation.

The reservoir surrounding the soaring rocky outcrop of El Penol is a popular weekend destination a little more than an hour from Medellin. It was especially busy on Sunday as Colombians celebrated a long holiday weekend.

Carlos Espinosa, an independent journalist from Guatape, said a few months ago townspeople awoke to find the El Almirante filled with water and sinking at its dock, suggesting that perhaps the vessel wasn’t ready to make a return to the water.

“What makes you angry is there are no controls by the government,” he said.

As night fell, the usually festive town was silent as people began to register the magnitude of the loss. Among those huddled under the rain near the port looking for information about loved ones was Alberto Villegas, who was separated from a cousin and uncle in the rush to abandon the sinking ship. “All we ask is that they don’t give up the search,” said Mr Villegas.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "LUIS BENAVIDES"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487098.1498500796!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487098.1498500796!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A tourist boat packed with passengers for the holiday weekend sunk, leaving at least six people dead and 15 missing. Picture: Juan Quiroz via AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A tourist boat packed with passengers for the holiday weekend sunk, leaving at least six people dead and 15 missing. Picture: Juan Quiroz via AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487098.1498500796!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/financial/fintech-set-for-further-surge-after-leap-in-take-up-1-4486399","id":"1.4486399","articleHeadline": "Fintech set for further surge after leap in take-up","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498457311000 ,"articleLead": "

Levels of financial technology adoption among the general public have surged globally over the past 18 months, with the UK leading the way among developed nations, according to a new study.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486398.1498457309!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "EY said that one in three 'digitally active' consumers now use fintech on a regular basis. Picture: Shutterstock"} ,"articleBody": "

One in three “digitally active” consumers is now using financial technology – or fintech – on a regular basis, following a sharp increase in take-up in both developed and emerging economies.

The latest EY FinTech Adoption Index – published today – reveals “significant growth” in the UK over the past 18 months, with adoption rates now standing at 42 per cent as more and more people embrace online banking and download apps to undertake a range of financial services.

The study, based on 22,000 online interviews with consumers across 20 markets, shows that emerging markets are driving much of this adoption with China, India, South Africa, Brazil and Mexico averaging 46 per cent, just ahead of the UK rate.

• READ MORE: Fintech news

China and India in particular have seen the highest adoption rates of fintech, at 69 per cent and 52 per cent respectively. Fintech businesses in these countries are particularly successful at tapping into the tech-literate but financially under-served segments, the report notes.

Financial technology is one of the fastest-growing parts of the UK economy, employing more than 60,000 people and generating in excess of £20 billion in revenues annually. With a major financial services sector and several tech start-up initiatives on the go, Scotland has been touted as a potential leader in the field.

• READ MORE: Scottish fintech body to be established to drive growth

Imran Gulamhuseinwala, EY global fintech leader, said: “Fintechs are clearly gaining widespread traction across global markets and have achieved the early stages of mass adoption in most countries.

“It really is now a critical time for traditional financial services companies. If they haven’t already, they need to urgently reassess their business models to ensure they are able to meet their customers’ rapidly changing needs.

“Disruption is no longer just a risk – it is an undisputable reality.”

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

The study reveals that money transfers and payments services are continuing to lead the fintech charge with adoption standing at 50 per cent in 2017, based on the consumers that were surveyed.

Some 88 per cent of respondents said they anticipate using fintech for this purpose in the future. The new services that have contributed to this upsurge include online digital-only banks and mobile phone payment at checkout.

The demographic most likely to use fintech are millennials – those aged 25 to 34 – followed by 35- to 44-year-olds.

The term fintech appears to have been coined in 1972 by Abraham Leon Bettinger, vice-president of Manufacturers Hanover, a New York bank, to describe technology “combining bank expertise with modern management science techniques and the computer”.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "sreid@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Scott Reid"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486398.1498457309!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486398.1498457309!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "EY said that one in three 'digitally active' consumers now use fintech on a regular basis. Picture: Shutterstock","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "EY said that one in three 'digitally active' consumers now use fintech on a regular basis. Picture: Shutterstock","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486398.1498457309!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/scottish-actress-married-to-president-trump-s-treasury-secretary-1-4486388","id":"1.4486388","articleHeadline": "Scottish actress married to President Trump’s Treasury secretary","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498455237000 ,"articleLead": "

It would appear to be a life far removed from the one she spent as a public schoolgirl in Edinburgh.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486387.1498455235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence pose at the wedding of Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and Louise Lintonat Andrew Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC. Picture: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS"} ,"articleBody": "

Her old classmates at St George’s School and Fettes College could be forgiven for examining her wedding photograph with a touch of amazement.

There she was sharing the limelight on her big day with the President of the United States and his wife.

Donald Trump and his first lady Melania were among the guests as the 36-year-old actress tied the knot with his Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

It may have been the 54-year-old’s third marriage, and the second time around for Ms Linton, who was previously married to a Hollywood lawyer, but all that was forgotten as they hosted around 300 guests at the Andrew W Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC, where the entertainment was said to have included kilted bagpipers and ballerinas in white tutus.

Other guests included the US Vice-President, Mike Pence, who officiated the wedding, Mr Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband and White House adviser Jared Kushner.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer and his wife Rebecca Miller were also in attendance at the wedding, where Ms Linton wore a lace gown, said to have been made for her by the Toronto-based designer Ines Di Santo.

The happy couple were said to have met at a wedding reception in Los Angeles in 2013. Mr Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs executive and Hollywood film financier believed to be worth more than $300 million, popped the question two years later.

He reportedly recently bought a Massachusetts Avenue Heights mansion for the newly-wed couple to move into. It is likely to be a step up from Melville Castle, the three-storey Georgian mansion Ms Linton grew up in Dalkeith, in Midlothian.

Ms Linton has previously spoken of how living in the haunted castle helped her prepare for roles in horror films.

She famously ended up in her own horror story last year over claims in a book that she almost died at the hands of African rebels, which she was forced to retract.

She was condemned by the Zambian High Commission in London for falsely presenting the country as “savage” after she published a 290-page account of six months she spent in Zambia in 1999. She wrote: “Gunshots echoed through the bush and seemed to be getting closer. I tried to face up to the possibility that my life was over. If I were discovered in my bolthole, I would be raped. I would be cut down.

“Smirking men with deadened eyes would brutalise me before casting me aside like a rag doll. My death, and the manner of it, seemed inevitable.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "BRIAN FERGUSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486387.1498455235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486387.1498455235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence pose at the wedding of Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and Louise Lintonat Andrew Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC. Picture: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence pose at the wedding of Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and Louise Lintonat Andrew Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC. Picture: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486387.1498455235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/1-000-forced-to-flee-spanish-national-park-as-fire-spreads-1-4486163","id":"1.4486163","articleHeadline": "1,000 forced to flee Spanish national park as fire spreads","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498415562000 ,"articleLead": "

A forest fire in southern Spain forced the evacuation of 1,000 people and is threatening a national park famous for its biodiversity, authorities have said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486162.1498415561!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The fire started overnight and had by morning encroached on the Donana National Park at Moguer in the southern region of Andalusia. Picture: CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The flames have advanced eastward and have entered Donana National Park, one of Spain’s most important nature reserves and a Unesco World Heritage site since 1994.

The park, which has more than 50,000 hectares of wetlands and woods, is an important stop for migratory birds from Africa and Europe and is home to a variety of animals, including the highly-endangered Iberian lynx and the Iberian imperial eagle.

“The fire has entered in the limits of the reserve, and that is where we are focusing our efforts,” Jose Gregorio Fiscal Lopez, from the regional Andalusian authority in charge of the environment, said.

Susana Diaz, the regional president of Andalusia, said there was “no risk to the population” after 1,000 people were evacuated from campsites and houses near the town of Moguer, on Spain’s southern coast, where the fire started on Saturday night.

By midday yesterday, at least 750 people were allowed to return.

Diaz said fighting the fire was proving difficult due to the hot, dry weather, with temperatures reaching 39C and shifting winds. More than 150 firefighters and 21 air units were combating the blaze yesterday after televised images showed trees engulfed by flames overnight.

Diaz said that, although it was still “very early”, authorities were “not ruling out the human factor” as a possible cause of the fire.

Diaz also thanked Spain’s King Felipe VI for his phone call of concern about the fire.

The fire comes a week after wildfires killed 64 people in neighbouring Portugal, which like Spain is suffering from lack of rain and high temperatures.

Portugal’s prime minister, António Costa, described the blazes – which injured dozens more people – as “the greatest tragedy we have seen in recent years in terms of forest fires”. Three days of national mourning were declared.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JOSEPH WILSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486162.1498415561!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486162.1498415561!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The fire started overnight and had by morning encroached on the Donana National Park at Moguer in the southern region of Andalusia. Picture: CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The fire started overnight and had by morning encroached on the Donana National Park at Moguer in the southern region of Andalusia. Picture: CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486162.1498415561!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/148-killed-in-pakistan-after-oil-tanker-bursts-into-flames-1-4486008","id":"1.4486008","articleHeadline": "148 killed in Pakistan after oil tanker bursts into flames","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498396173000 ,"articleLead": "

An overturned oil tanker burst into flames in Pakistan on Sunday, killing 148 people who had rushed to the scene of the highway accident to gather leaking fuel, an official said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486005.1498396154!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Rescue workers gather near the oil tanker. Picture AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The death toll could rise further as another 50 people are still in critical condition, said Dr. Mohammad Baqar, a senior rescue official in the area. There were dozens of other injuries of varying degree, he said.

Local news channels showed black smoke billowing skyward and horrific images of scores of burned bodies, as well as rescue officials speeding the injured to hospital and army helicopters ferrying the wounded.

Saznoor Ahmad, 30, whose two cousins were killed in the fire, said the crowd of people screamed as the flames engulfed them.

“The fire moved so fast,” he said. When the flames subsided the field was strewn with bodies, and nearby were the charred shells of motorcycles and cars that the villagers had used to race to the scene.

As the wounded cried out for help, residents wandered through the area looking for loved ones.

Zulkha Bibi was searching for her two sons.

“Someone should tell me about my beloved sons, where are they? Are they alive or are they no longer in this world? Please tell me,” she pleaded.

The disaster came on the eve of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.

While Saudi Arabia and most other Muslim countries celebrated the holiday Sunday, Pakistanis will celebrate on Monday.

The tanker was driving from the southern port city of Karachi to Lahore, the Punjab provincial capital, when the driver lost control and crashed on the national highway outside Bahawalpur.

A loudspeaker atop a local mosque alerted villagers to the leaking fuel, and scores raced to the site with jerry cans, said Rana Mohammad Salim, deputy commissioner of Bahawalpur.

Highway police moved quickly to redirect traffic but couldn’t stop the scores of villagers who raced to collect the fuel, spokesman Imran Shah told a local TV channel.

When the fire erupted, the same mosque loudspeaker called on the remaining villagers to help put it out.

Mohammed Salim ran toward the smoke carrying buckets of water and sand, but said the heat was too intense to reach those in need.

“I could hear people screaming but I couldn’t get to them,” he said.

Abdul Malik, a local police officer who was also among the first to arrive, described a “horrible scene.”

“I have never seen anything like it in my life. Victims trapped in the fireball. They were screaming for help,” he said.

When the fire subsided, “we saw bodies everywhere, so many were just skeletons. The people who were alive were in really bad shape,” he said.

Eyewitnesses said about 30 motorcycles that had carried villagers to the accident site lay charred nearby. Eight other vehicles were destroyed, they said.

Some of the most badly burned were evacuated by army helicopters to Multan, about 60 miles away.

The dead included men, women and children. Many were burned beyond recognition, Baqar said, and will have to be identified using DNA testing.

Click here for more international news from The Scotsman

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486005.1498396154!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486005.1498396154!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Rescue workers gather near the oil tanker. Picture AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Rescue workers gather near the oil tanker. Picture AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486005.1498396154!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486006.1498396163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486006.1498396163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Pakistani soldiers stand guard beside burnt out vehicles at the scene. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Pakistani soldiers stand guard beside burnt out vehicles at the scene. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486006.1498396163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486007.1498396172!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486007.1498396172!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The oil tanker overturned on the national highway outside Bahawalpur, en route from Karachi to Lahore. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The oil tanker overturned on the national highway outside Bahawalpur, en route from Karachi to Lahore. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486007.1498396172!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/donald-trump-among-guests-at-louise-linton-s-wedding-1-4486004","id":"1.4486004","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump among guests at Louise Linton’s wedding","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498395974000 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump were among the guests as treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin married Edinburgh actress Louise Linton.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486003.1498395972!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS)"} ,"articleBody": "

Mr Mnuchin exchanged vows with Ms Linton at the Andrew W Mellon Auditorium in Washington.

Linton was born in the Murrayfield and attended St George’s School for Girls and Fettes College.

Her family owns Melville Castle outside the city.

Mrs Trump wore a pink blush dress and the president was in a tuxedo. V

ice president Mike Pence also attended.

Mr Mnuchin, 54, worked for the Goldman Sachs investment firm for nearly two decades before founding a hedge fund.

He also ran a company that invested in Hollywood movies and was finance chairman of Mr Trump’s presidential campaign.

Edinburgh-born Ms Linton, 36, has appeared in movies including Cabin Fever, and TV shows such as CSI: NY.

Mr Mnuchin also produced movies before joining the government.

It is his third marriage and the second for Ms Linton.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Diane King"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486003.1498395972!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486003.1498395972!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, Louise Linton, Vice President Mike Pence, and Second Lady Karen Pence. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for LS)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486003.1498395972!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/police-thwart-terrorist-plot-at-islam-s-holiest-site-1-4485738","id":"1.4485738","articleHeadline": "Police thwart terrorist plot at Islam’s holiest site","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498335164000 ,"articleLead": "

A suicide bomber blew himself up near the Grand Mosque at Mecca as police disrupted a plot to target the holiest site in Islam just as the fasting month of Ramadan ends, Saudi security forces said yesterday.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485737.1498335164!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The attack site. Picture: AFP/Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The interior ministry said it launched a raid around Jiddah, as well as two areas in Mecca itself, including the Ajyad Al-Masafi neighbourhood, located near the Grand Mosque.

There, police said they engaged in a shootout at a three-storey house with a suicide bomber, who blew himself up and caused the building’s collapse. He was killed while the blast wounded six foreigners and five members of security forces. Five people were arrested, including a woman.

Saudi state television aired footage after the raid on Friday near the Grand Mosque, showing police and rescue personnel running through the neighbourhood’s narrow streets. The blast demolished the building, its walls crushing a parked car as what appeared to be shrapnel and bullet holes peppered nearby structures.

The interior ministry “confirms that this terrorist network, whose terrorist plan was thwarted, violated, in what they would have perpetrated, all sanctities by targeting the security of the Grand Mosque, the holiest place on Earth.”

“They obeyed their evil and corrupt self-serving schemes managed from abroad whose aim is to destabilise the security and stability of this blessed country,” the statement said.

The ministry did not name the group involved in the attack. The ultra conservative Sunni kingdom battled an al-Qaeda insurgency for years and more recently has faced attacks from a local branch of so-called Islamic State. Neither group immediately claimed responsibility, although IS sympathisers online have urged more attacks as an offensive in Iraq slowly squeezes the extremists out of Mosul and their de facto capital of Raqqa in Syria is bombed daily by a US-led coalition.

The disrupted attack comes at a sensitive time in Saudi Arabia as King Salman earlier this week short-circuited the kingdom’s succession by making his son, defence minister Mohammed bin Salman, first in line to the throne. The newly appointed crown prince is the architect of Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen against Shi’ite rebels.

As the interior ministry announced the raid, more than one million Muslims prayed at the Prophet’s Mosque in Medina to mark the end of Ramadan.

In July 2016, a suicide bombing there killed four members of Saudi Arabia’s security forces. Millions from around the world visit the mosque, the burial site of the Prophet Muhammad, every year.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485737.1498335164!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485737.1498335164!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The attack site. Picture: AFP/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The attack site. Picture: AFP/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485737.1498335164!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/turkey-bans-gay-pride-march-over-safety-concerns-1-4485734","id":"1.4485734","articleHeadline": "Turkey bans gay pride march over ‘safety concerns’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498334434000 ,"articleLead": "

Turkish authorities have banned a march for gay, lesbian and trans rights due to take place today.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485733.1498334433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Marchers at Pride Week in Istanbul in 2015, when police used a water cannon. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The Istanbul governor’s office said yesterday that the LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) Pride would be banned for the safety of participants and tourists, and public order.

LGBTI activists had announced on social media that they would organise a march starting from Istanbul’s Taksim Square.

The governor’s office stated the area was not designated for demonstrations and an appropriate application had not been received. It also said various groups had raised “serious reactions” against the march.

The 2014 Pride March in Istanbul attracted up to 100,000 people – one of the largest gatherings celebrating LGBTI rights and diversity in the Muslim world. Authorities have not allowed a Pride march since.

Prior to the ban, Pride Week in Istanbul attracted tens of thousands of participants.

That changed suddenly two years ago when authorities, citing security concerns, banned gay and transgender pride events and chased away shocked participants assembling at central Taksim Square with tear gas and water cannons.

The reversal, activists say, coincides with Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan shedding his reformist past, taking an increasingly authoritarian line and raising Islam’s profile in the officially secular country.

In his early years in office as prime minister, Erdogan worked to advance minority rights as part of efforts to join the European Union.

Unlike other Muslim countries, homosexuality is not a crime in Turkey. However, lesbian, gay and transgender activists say they lack legal protections and face widespread social stigma in a nation that is heavily influenced by conservative and religious values.

The Pride Week events and parade, held in Istanbul since 2003, allowed the LGBTI community to try to break the stigma and assert rights, including demands for explicit bans on discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

“The fact that the existing political power is not making the necessary changes in the constitution, and the fact that they have discourse against us might encourage people who are already trans phobic,” said Seyhan Arman, a 37-year-old transgender woman and performer.

Deniz Sapka, a transgender woman originally from the south-eastern Turkish province of Hakkari, is concerned about the lack of legal protection for her community.

“The state is not developing new politics on this and there is no legislation on our fundamental rights and freedoms. Generally the working life is problematic,” said the 27-year-old.

Organisers believe that celebrations in 2015 and 2016 were banned because they coincided with Islam’s holy month of Ramadan.

Turkey’s LGBTI community is now braced for another confrontation with police today following the latest ban. The day coincides with the Muslim Eid holiday and also comes as Turkey is under a state of emergency following last year’s failed coup attempt, which allows authorities to ban public gatherings.

“The bans are a reflection of the increasingly conservative and majoritarian policies of the government,” said Murat Koylu, of the Ankara-based Koas GL, a group promoting LGBTI rights.

Last year an ultra-nationalist and conservative group, the Alperen Ocaklari, threatened to attack the celebrations if authorities did not ban them.

The group, linked to Turkey’s Great Unity Party, repeated the threat last week despite an ongoing court case against them brought by the LGBTI community.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485733.1498334433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485733.1498334433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Marchers at Pride Week in Istanbul in 2015, when police used a water cannon. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Marchers at Pride Week in Istanbul in 2015, when police used a water cannon. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485733.1498334433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/china-landslide-120-buried-as-rocks-and-earth-crush-homes-1-4485473","id":"1.4485473","articleHeadline": "China landslide: 120 buried as rocks and earth crush homes","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498302797000 ,"articleLead": "

More than 120 people have been buried by a landslide that caused huge rocks and a mass of earth to crash into their homes in a mountain village in south-western China early on Saturday, officials said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485470.1498302785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dozens of people are feared buried by the landslide that crashed into their homes in southwestern China. Picture: Chinatopix/AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The landslide, which came from a mountain, engulfed a cluster of 62 homes and a hotel in the village of Xinmo in Mao County at about 6am local time, the Sichuan provincial government said. Officials said one mile (1.6km) of road was buried in the disaster.

“It’s the biggest landslide to hit this area since the Wenchuan earthquake,” Wang Yongbo, an official leading one of the rescue efforts, told state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV). He was referring to China’s deadliest earthquake this century, a magnitude 7.9 temblor which struck Sichuan province in May 2008, killing nearly 90,000 people.

The provincial government said more than 120 people were buried by the landslide in Xinmo. CCTV cited a rescuer as saying that five bodies had been found.

Rescuers pulled out three people, two of whom had survived, the official Sichuan Daily newspaper said on its microblog. The paper also said a family of three, including a month-old baby, managed to escape just as the landslide started to hit their house.

Qiao Dashuai told CCTV that the baby saved the family because he was woken up by the child’s crying and was going to change the baby’s nappy when he heard a noise that alerted him to the landslide.

“We heard a strange noise at the back of our house, and it was rather loud,” Qiao said. “Wind was coming into the room so I wanted to close the door. When we came out, water flow swept us away instantly.”

He said they struggled against the flood of water until they met medical workers who took them to hospital. Qiao said his parents and other relatives had not been found.

Mao County, or Maoxian, sits on the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and is home to about 110,000 people, according to the government’s website. Most residents are of the Qiang ethnic minority. The village is known locally for tourism, and Chinese reports said it was unclear if tourists were among those buried by the landslide.

The landslide blocked a 1.2-mile (2km) section of a river. The provincial government said on its website that an estimated 282 million cubic feet (8 million cubic metres) of earth and rock - equivalent to more than 3,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools - had slid down the mountain.

Experts told CCTV that the landslide was probably triggered by rain. A meteorologist interviewed by CCTV said there was light rain in the area that would continue for a few days.

The Sichuan Daily said rescuers made contact with a villager buried under the rubble who answered her mobile phone when they called and burst into tears. The woman was in the bedroom of her home when the landslide hit the village, and rescuers were trying to reach her, the report said.

Search and rescue efforts were under way involving more than 400 workers, including police. CCTV showed footage of rescuers in bright orange uniforms using earth movers and excavators but also relying on ropes to pull at huge rocks and shovels to dig up the dirt.

Provincial police sent 500 rescuers with two dozen sniffer dogs to the site, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

Click here for more international news from The Scotsman

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485470.1498302785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485470.1498302785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Dozens of people are feared buried by the landslide that crashed into their homes in southwestern China. Picture: Chinatopix/AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dozens of people are feared buried by the landslide that crashed into their homes in southwestern China. Picture: Chinatopix/AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485470.1498302785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485471.1498302791!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485471.1498302791!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Emergency personnel and locals work at the site of a landslide in Xinmo village. Picture: Chinatopix/AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Emergency personnel and locals work at the site of a landslide in Xinmo village. Picture: Chinatopix/AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485471.1498302791!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485472.1498302797!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485472.1498302797!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Emergency personnel work at the site of a massive landslide in Maoxian County in southwestern China's Sichuan Province. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Emergency personnel work at the site of a massive landslide in Maoxian County in southwestern China's Sichuan Province. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485472.1498302797!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/sienna-miller-speaks-out-on-film-industry-s-gender-pay-gap-1-4485458","id":"1.4485458","articleHeadline": "Sienna Miller speaks out on film industry’s gender pay gap","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498300346000 ,"articleLead": "

Sienna Miller has weighed into the film industry’s gender pay gap debate, saying she thinks women “should be compensated sometimes more than your male co-stars”.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The actress, 35, will soon be seen treading the boards on London’s West End in the award-winning Tennessee Williams play Cat On A Hot Tin Roof.

Miller will star as Maggie, often referred to as “Maggie the cat”, alongside Unbroken and former Skins star Jack O’Connell, who plays her husband, Brick.

The play tells the story of a Southern family who gather at their cotton plantation in celebration of Big Daddy, the family patriarch’s birthday, but lies, secrets and sexual tensions threaten the future for everybody.

She told The Daily Telegraph Review section when asked if she’d experienced the gender pay gap in films: “Yes… to a degree where it’s staggering.”

She added: “At the time, I felt grateful, even knowing what (my) co-star was getting, but actually you’re so leaned on as a woman to promote a film by doing magazine covers, by what you wear on red carpets… they rely on that so heavily that you really should be compensated sometimes more than your male co-stars for what you’re asked to do.”

Miller follows in the footsteps of actresses such as Kathleen Turner, Scarlett Johansson and the late Dallas star Barbara Bel Geddes who have played Maggie on stage, and it was Elizabeth Taylor’s portrayal in the 1958 film version that earned her a best actress Academy Award nomination the following year.

The play will run at London’s Apollo Theatre from July to October this year.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/nicholas-kristof-mass-killer-opioids-met-with-a-shrug-1-4485227","id":"1.4485227","articleHeadline": "Nicholas Kristof: Mass killer Opioids met with a shrug","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498280400000 ,"articleLead": "

Overdose deaths in US this year are set to match combined toll in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan wars says Nicolas Kristof

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485226.1498248251!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Too many Republicans see drug abuse as a criminal problem, ignoring the need for a real medical solution"} ,"articleBody": "

About as many Americans are expected to die this year of drug overdoses as died in the Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined.

For more than 100 years, death rates have been dropping for Americans - but now, because of opioids, death rates are rising again. We as a nation are going backward, and drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

“There’s no question that there’s an epidemic and that this is a national public health emergency,” Dr Leana Wen, the health commissioner of Baltimore, told me. “The number of people overdosing is skyrocketing, and we have no indication that we’ve reached the peak.”

Yet our efforts to address this scourge are pathetic.

We responded to World War II with the storming of Normandy, and to Sputnik with our moon shot. Yet we answer this current national menace with … a Republican plan for health care that would deprive millions of insurance and lead to even more deaths!

More on President Donald Trump’s fumbling of this problem in a moment. But it’s bizarre that Republicans should be complacent about opioids, because the toll is disproportionately in red states - and it affects everyone.

Mary Taylor, the Republican lieutenant governor of Ohio and now a candidate for governor, has acknowledged that both her sons, Joe and Michael, have struggled with opioid addiction, resulting in two overdoses at home, urgent calls for ambulances and failed drug rehab efforts. Good for her for speaking up.

It should be a national scandal that only 10 per cent of Americans with opioid problems get treatment. This reflects our failed insistence on treating opioids as a criminal justice problem rather than as a public health crisis.

A Times investigation published this month estimated that more than 59,000 Americans died in 2016 of drug overdoses, in the largest annual jump in such deaths ever recorded in the U.S. One reason is the spread of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is cheap and potent, leading to overdoses.

Another bad omen: As a nation, we’re still hooked on prescription painkillers. Last year, there were more than 236 million prescriptions written for opioids in the United States — that’s about one bottle of opioids for every American adult.

Even with all that’s at stake, there are three reasons to doubt that Trump will confront the problem. First, Trump and Republicans in Congress seem determined to repeal Obamacare, which provides for addiction treatment, and slash Medicaid. The Congressional Budget Office estimated that the GOP House plan would result in an additional 23 million Americans being uninsured in a decade - and thus less able to get drug treatment. Other, more technical elements of the GOP plan would also result in less treatment.

Second, Tom Price, the secretary of health and human services, last month seemed to belittle the medication treatments for opioid addiction that have the best record, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions still seems to think we can jail our way out of the problem.

Third, Trump’s main step has been to appoint Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey to lead a task force to investigate opioid addiction. But we needn’t waste more time investigating, for we know what to do - and in any case Christie talks a good game but bungled the issue in his home state.

Among experts, there’s overwhelming evidence of what works best: medication in conjunction with counseling. This doesn’t succeed in every case, but it does reduce deaths and improve lives. It also saves public money, because a result is fewer emergency room visits and inpatient hospital stays. So the question isn’t whether we can afford treatment for all people fighting addiction, but whether we can afford not to provide it.

The bottom line is that we need a major national public health initiative to treat as many Americans abusing drugs as possible, with treatment based on science and evidence.

We also need to understand that drug overdoses are symptoms of deeper malaise - “deaths of despair,” in the words of Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University, stemming from economic woes - and seek to address the underlying issues.

Above all, let’s show compassion. Addiction is a disease, like diabetes and high blood pressure. We would never tell diabetics to forget medication and watch their diets and exercise more - and we would be aghast if only 10 per cent of diabetics were getting lifesaving treatment.

Innumerable people with addictions whom I’ve interviewed haunt me. One was a nurse who became dependent on prescription painkillers and was fired when she was caught stealing painkillers from a hospital. She became homeless and survived by providing sex to strangers in exchange for money or drugs.

She wept as she told me her story, for she was disgusted with what she had become - but we as a society should be disgusted by our own collective complacency, by our refusal to help hundreds of thousands of neighbours who are sick and desperate for help.

© 2017 New York Times News Service

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "NICHOLAS KRISTOF"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485226.1498248251!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485226.1498248251!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Too many Republicans see drug abuse as a criminal problem, ignoring the need for a real medical solution","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Too many Republicans see drug abuse as a criminal problem, ignoring the need for a real medical solution","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485226.1498248251!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/financial/bailed-out-allied-irish-banks-returns-to-stock-market-1-4484633","id":"1.4484633","articleHeadline": "Bailed-out Allied Irish Banks returns to stock market","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498217353000 ,"articleLead": "

Ireland has returned Allied Irish Banks (AIB) to the stock market in a landmark moment that underscores the lender’s recovery after it was saved from collapse during the financial crisis.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484632.1498217354!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ireland's government hailed a 'significant milestone' as it sold shares in Allied Irish Banks. Picture: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The Irish government completed the biggest European share sale this year, raising €3 billion (£2.6bn) in a flotation that valued AIB at €12bn.

The move carried an offer price of €4.40 per share and will see the state continue to hold a 71 per cent to 75 per cent stake, with a view to selling it off in the coming years.

• READ MORE: Allied Irish offers £20m to Scottish-Italian firms

Paschal Donohoe, Ireland’s finance minister, said the initial public offering (IPO) had created a “strong platform” for the government to recover all the money it had invested into AIB during the 2008 banking crisis.

He said: “The successful completion today of AIB’s IPO represents a significant milestone in the government’s long-held policy to dispose of our banking investments, returning them to the private sector over time.

“The offer was very well received and attracted high demand from investors everywhere it was marketed, reflecting the strength of AIB’s investment story and prospects, and the attractions of Ireland’s vibrant and growing economy.”

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

AIB’s exposure to Ireland’s property market crash nine years ago brought the country to its knees and triggered a €21bn bailout to help shore up the nation’s economy.

The bank said in March that it had returned a further €1.8bn to the state, meaning it had paid back €6.8bn of the €21bn bailout fund.

The lender also reported an annual pre-tax profit of €1.7bn earlier this year, and delivered a dividend for the first time in nine years.

AIB’s shares will now be listed on the Irish Stock Exchange and the London Stock Exchange.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Ben Woods"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484632.1498217354!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484632.1498217354!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Ireland's government hailed a 'significant milestone' as it sold shares in Allied Irish Banks. Picture: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ireland's government hailed a 'significant milestone' as it sold shares in Allied Irish Banks. Picture: Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484632.1498217354!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/donald-trump-nominates-new-york-jets-owner-as-uk-ambassador-1-4484323","id":"1.4484323","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump nominates New York Jets owner as UK ambassador","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498204963000 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump has said he will nominate tycoon Woody Johnson, owner of the New York Jets American football team, as the US ambassador to Britain.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484321.1498204960!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "New York Jets NFL football owner Woody Johnson. Picture; AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The president had tipped Mr Johnson for the job when he said the businessman was “going to St James’s” during a luncheon in January.

At the time the appointment was welcomed as a “stylish” choice as the US’s top diplomat in London, also known as ambassador to the Court of St James’s.

Mr Johnson, 70, helped raise money for Mr Trump’s presidential campaign and donated funds to help pay for his inauguration.

The billionaire businessman and philanthropist from the Johnson & Johnson family is chairman and chief executive of the Jets, although will hand over to his brother, Christopher, should the nomination be approved.

The team’s president, Neil Glat, said: “On behalf of the entire organisation, we would be extremely proud to see Woody nominated and confirmed as US ambassador. We could not be more excited for him and his family.”

The nomination has to be approved by the US Senate, which will also decide on Mr Trump’s choice of ambassador to Belgium, Jamie McCourt.

Ms McCourt was co-owner and chief executive of the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team until 2009.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484321.1498204960!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484321.1498204960!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "New York Jets NFL football owner Woody Johnson. Picture; AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "New York Jets NFL football owner Woody Johnson. Picture; AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484321.1498204960!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484322.1498204964!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484322.1498204964!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "President Donald Trump has said he will nominate the Jets owner. Picture; AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Donald Trump has said he will nominate the Jets owner. Picture; AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484322.1498204964!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/celebrity/video-johnny-depp-jokes-about-donald-trump-assassination-1-4484161","id":"1.4484161","articleHeadline": "Video: Johnny Depp jokes about Donald Trump assassination","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498197462000 ,"articleLead": "

Johnny Depp joked about assassinating President Donald Trump during an appearance at Glastonbury Festival.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484158.1498197456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Johnny Depp at a Cineramageddon screening of The Libertine, during the Glastonbury Festival. Picture; Ben Birchall"} ,"articleBody": "

The Hollywood actor received a rock star welcome during the event at Cineramageddon - a drive-in cinema situated on the Somerset site.

He introduced his 2004 film The Libertine along with film director Julien Temple but began talking about religion and President Trump following questions from the 1,500-strong audience.

“I think he needs help and there are a lot of wonderful dark, dark places he could go,” Depp said, to cheers from the crowd.

“It is just a question - I’m not insinuating anything.

“By the way, this is going to be in the press. It will be horrible.

“I like that you are all a part of it.

“When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?

“I want to qualify, I am not an actor. I lie for a living.

“However, it has been a while and maybe it is time.”

Depp, who arrived in a blue vintage Cadillac, was greeted with crowds of screaming fans holding phones.

He smoked a cigarette as he posed for pictures and jumped on the car bonnet without prompting. Wearing a black shirt and distressed jeans, he also sported a black hat with a silver ribbon around it.

Introducing the film, he said: “Thank you so much for having me here.

“This is beautiful, chaotic, madness.

“I made this film, The Libertine - people talk about Lavie of love and all that stuff.

“I made the film because I wanted to try to bring to England a great poet that that missed.

“They missed him because he was written off as a jokester, a hoaxer.

“This guy is one of the deepest poets. He was very religious.

“Someone asks to talk about religion. How long you got?

“It is a film that a lot of people worked very hard on.”

Fans, many sat in vintage cars and trucks, then enjoyed a screening of The Libertine.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CLAIRE HAYHURST"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484158.1498197456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484158.1498197456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Johnny Depp at a Cineramageddon screening of The Libertine, during the Glastonbury Festival. Picture; Ben Birchall","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Johnny Depp at a Cineramageddon screening of The Libertine, during the Glastonbury Festival. Picture; Ben Birchall","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484158.1498197456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484159.1498197461!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484159.1498197461!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Actor Johnny Depp joked about assassinating Donald Trump. Picture; AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Actor Johnny Depp joked about assassinating Donald Trump. Picture; AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484159.1498197461!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498196927470"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/tech/under-pressure-uber-chief-executive-travis-kalanick-quits-1-4482894","id":"1.4482894","articleHeadline": "Under-pressure Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick quits","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498134469000 ,"articleLead": "

Travis Kalanick has resigned as chief executive of taxi-hailing firm Uber following a series of scandals.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4482893.1498134470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick had already been on indefinite leave. Picture: Money Sharma/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Kalanick, who helped found the company in 2009, is reported to have quit following shareholder unrest over his leadership.

Uber has been dogged by questions over its working culture, including sexual harassment, allegations of trade secrets theft and an investigation into efforts to mislead government regulators.

• READ MORE: Taxi app Uber launches in Edinburgh

Heavyweight investors – Benchmark, First Round Capital, Lowercase Capital, Menlo Ventures and Fidelity Investments wrote a letter titled “Moving Uber Forward”, demanding Kalanick steps down, according to The New York Times.

As well as Kalanick’s immediate resignation, they demanded the board appoints more “truly independent directors” and that Uber hires an experienced finance chief.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Kalanick said: “I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors’ request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight.”

He had already been on indefinite leave amid criticism of his management style and following the death of his mother in a boating accident.

An Uber spokesman said: “Travis has always put Uber first. This is a bold decision and a sign of his devotion and love for Uber.

“By stepping away, he’s taking the time to heal from his personal tragedy while giving the company room to fully embrace this new chapter in Uber’s history. We look forward to continuing to serve with him on the board.”

Ann Francke, chief executive of the Chartered Management Institute, said: “Travis Kalanick might have run a company, but he didn’t lead it. Placing profit before people, and growth before culture has ultimately cost him the support of his investors and a role at the head of a company he professes to love.

“Sadly a toxic culture is not unique to Uber and let’s hope others, both in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, learn from this. Ultimately companies are built on their people, and creating a culture of trust and transparency is essential to long-term success.”

Uber has embarked on a 180-day programme to change its image by allowing riders to give drivers tips through the Uber app, something the company had resisted under Kalanick.

The Silicon Valley company is valued at more than $60 billion (£47bn).

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Ravender Sembhy and Gareth Mackie"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4482893.1498134470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4482893.1498134470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick had already been on indefinite leave. Picture: Money Sharma/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick had already been on indefinite leave. Picture: Money Sharma/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4482893.1498134470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/dundee-tayside/m-a-s-h-actor-alan-alda-gets-honorary-degree-from-dundee-uni-1-4482219","id":"1.4482219","articleHeadline": "M*A*S*H actor Alan Alda gets honorary degree from Dundee Uni","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498052617000 ,"articleLead": "

US actor Alan Alda, famous for his roles in M*A*S*H and The West Wing, has received an honorary degree from Dundee University for his work promoting the communication of science.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4482218.1498052619!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Actor Alan Alda. Picture: Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

The 81-year-old was made a Doctor of Law at a graduation ceremony in the city’s Caird Hall.

The actor, who became a worldwide name in his role as Captain Hawkeye Pierce in M*A*S*H, a tragi-com series which portrayed life during the Korean War, helped found the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

READ MORE: University of Dundee’s rising science stars

Mr Alda last year supported Dundee University’s new £10m forensic science research centre.

On receiving his honour, he said: “I feel great, it’s wonderful. I don’t quite understand the doctorate of law, I haven’t broken many so maybe that’s it.”

The Alan Alda Center is an international partner of Dundee University’s Leverhulme Centre, which is co-led by Professor Dame Sue Black, who proposed the actor for the honour.

Mr Alda said greater understanding of science was “more important now than ever.”

He added: “I did a science programme on television where I interviewed hundreds of scientists for eleven years.

“The University of Dundee are planning to have a partnership with a really important area, which is science in the courtrooms and the justice system with regard to forensic science.

“It’s very important the public understand about science to ask important questions.

READ MORE: University of Dundee to fight epidemic of addictive drugs

“We’re entitled to be heard with our questions and our objections but we need to have a language that is common.

“It doesn’t do much good for scientists to tell us something we don’t understand or for us to ask questions based on misunderstanding.”

Alda played the starring role in M*A*S*H as a surgeon for the US Army during the Korean War. He was also a writer and director. He was nominated for 21 Emmy Awards, and won five. He took part in writing 19 episodes of M*A*S*H, including the 1983 series finale Goodbye, Farewell and Amen, which was also the 32nd episode he directed.

It remains the single most-watched episode of any American broadcast network television series.[9] Alda is the only series regular to appear in all 251 episodes.

Other recipients of honorary degrees include Olympian Dame Katherine Grainger and Turner Prize-winning artist Susan Philipsz.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALISTAIR MUNRO"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4482218.1498052619!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4482218.1498052619!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Actor Alan Alda. Picture: Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Actor Alan Alda. Picture: Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4482218.1498052619!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/brussels-central-station-evacuated-after-explosion-1-4481496","id":"1.4481496","articleHeadline": "Brussels Central Station evacuated after ‘explosion’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498022376000 ,"articleLead": "

A man was shot by security forces at Brussels Central Station following an attempted bomb attack, Belgian officials have confirmed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4481495.1497989016!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Belgian police officers outside Brussels Central Station following a previous incident. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The person reportedly caused a small explosion before being shot by the authorities. No one else was injured.

The station and the city’s main square, the Grand Place, were evacuated following the incident on Tuesday evening.

According to Belgian newspaper La Libre, the man was wearing a rucksack and a bomb belt.

He detonated a device when he attracted the attention of soldiers in the station, the paper said.

The Belgian capital has stepped up security in public places following an attack in March 2016 at the city’s main airport and on the metro system that killed 32 people.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4481495.1497989016!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4481495.1497989016!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Belgian police officers outside Brussels Central Station following a previous incident. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Belgian police officers outside Brussels Central Station following a previous incident. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4481495.1497989016!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498022228223"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/us-student-sent-home-from-north-korea-dies-1-4480583","id":"1.4480583","articleHeadline": "US student sent home from North Korea dies","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1497944711000 ,"articleLead": "

Otto Warmbier, an American college student who was released by North Korea in a coma last week after almost a year and a half in captivity, died Monday, his family said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480582.1497944713!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "American student Otto Warmbier died at home after returning from North Korea last week. Picture; AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The 22-year-old “has completed his journey home,” relatives said in a statement. They did not cite a specific cause of death.

“Unfortunately, the awful, torturous mistreatment our son received at the hands of the North Koreans ensured that no other outcome was possible beyond the sad one we experienced today,” his parents said.

Doctors had described his condition as a state of “unresponsive wakefulness” and said he suffered a “severe neurological injury” of unknown cause.

His father, Fred Warmbier, said last week that he believed Otto had been fighting for months to stay alive to return to his family. The family said he looked uncomfortable and anguished after arriving June 13 but his countenance later changed.

“He was peace. He was home, and we believe he could sense that,” they said.

Warmbier was accused of trying to steal a propaganda banner while visiting with a tour group and was convicted of subversion. He was put before North Korean officials and journalists for a televised “confession.”

“I have made the worst mistake of my life!” he exclaimed, choking up as he begged to be allowed to reunite with his parents and two younger siblings.

He was sentenced to 15 years in prison with hard labor.

The University of Virginia student was held for more than 17 months. His family said it was told he had been a coma since soon after his March 2016 sentencing.

Doctors said he suffered extensive loss of brain tissue and “profound weakness and contraction” of his muscles, arms and legs. His eyes opened and blinked but without any sign that he understood verbal commands or his surroundings.

North Korea said Warmbier went into a coma after contracting botulism and taking a sleeping pill. Doctors in Cincinnati said they found no active sign of botulism or evidence of beatings.

His parents told The Associated Press the day of his release that they wanted “the world to know how we and our son have been brutalized and terrorized by the pariah regime.”

Fred Warmbier praised his son’s “performance” and President Donald Trump’s administration. He was critical of the approach to his son’s situation taken by former President Barack Obama’s administration.

In a White House statement, Trump said, “A lot of bad things happened, but at least we got him home to be with his parents.” He called North Korea a “brutal regime.”

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said he offered his prayers as Warmbier’s parents “enter a time of grief no parent should ever know,” and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Warmbier’s death “touches the American heart like no other.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "DAN SEWELL"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4480582.1497944713!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480582.1497944713!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "American student Otto Warmbier died at home after returning from North Korea last week. Picture; AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "American student Otto Warmbier died at home after returning from North Korea last week. Picture; AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4480582.1497944713!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/champs-elysees-paris-attack-man-downed-after-driving-into-police-1-4480099","id":"1.4480099","articleHeadline": "Champs-Elysees Paris attack: man ‘downed’ after driving into police","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1497883224000 ,"articleLead": "

A man has rammed his car into a police vehicle in the Champs-Elysees shopping district in Paris, French officials said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480104.1497883847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police vehicles prevent the access to the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris on Monday. Picture: AP Photo/Bertrand Combaldieu"} ,"articleBody": "

The incident happened on the Champs-Elysees this afternoon and led to a section of the famous boulevard being evacuated.

The attacker, who was armed, was knocked unconscious and is seriously injured, French media report.

Interior ministry spokesman Pierre-Henry Brandet said the driver, whose car exploded as he tried to ram a police vehicle, is “most probably” dead.

Mr Brandet said bomb squads were still securing the scene.

He said the attacker appeared to have acted deliberately.

France’s anti-terrorism prosecutor has opened an investigation into the incident.

Police had earlier warned people to avoid the neighbourhood, one of the French capital’s most popular with tourists.

France remains in a state of emergency after being hit by a wave of deadly terror attacks in recent years.

A police officer was shot dead and two others were wounded in an attack on the Champs Elysees in April.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4480104.1497883847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480104.1497883847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police vehicles prevent the access to the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris on Monday. Picture: AP Photo/Bertrand Combaldieu","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police vehicles prevent the access to the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris on Monday. Picture: AP Photo/Bertrand Combaldieu","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4480104.1497883847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4480105.1497883852!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480105.1497883852!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers and pedestrians stand by a sealed off area on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris. Picture: Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers and pedestrians stand by a sealed off area on the Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris. Picture: Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4480105.1497883852!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4480106.1497883856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4480106.1497883856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers walk accross a sealed off area on June 19, 2017 on the Champs-Elysees. Picture: AFP/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers walk accross a sealed off area on June 19, 2017 on the Champs-Elysees. Picture: AFP/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4480106.1497883856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/dominic-hinde-vague-brexit-approach-means-uk-is-in-for-wild-two-years-1-4479659","id":"1.4479659","articleHeadline": "Dominic Hinde: Vague Brexit approach means UK is in for ‘wild two years’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1497864137000 ,"articleLead": "

The British economy is so entangled with the EU that cutting it off virtually overnight would be disastrous, writes Dominic Hinde

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479658.1498214937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A member of protocol changes the EU and British flags prior to the start of Brexit negotiations. Picture: AP/Virginia Mayo"} ,"articleBody": "

When I was in my first year of university, I wrote a terrible essay on the advantages of leaving the EU.

Going through the feedback on the exam script was sobering, and put an end to the delusions about my own genius I’d carried over from school.

As the lecturer pointed out, I had written a barely coherent 2000 words based on some vague ideas about Norway. If I had carried on in the same vein I’d have failed my degree, and it would have been entirely my own fault.

Fast-forward a decade and UK politics looks like my teenage hubris writ large.

Competing voices in the Conservatives are expressing support for hard, soft, open and ‘wet’ Brexits.

Get the latest news on Brexit from our politics section

All of these are essentially meaningless, because none of them have outlined how these relate to specific parts of the Treaty on European Union, the central agreement the UK has decided to withdraw from.

Everyone knows the UK is seceding from the treaty, but nobody knows which parts it wants to replicate, and how it views its relationship to the associated Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union which outlines the details of everything from the free movement of goods to the European Investment Bank and structural funds.

Any kind of soft Brexit will mean finding a special place for Britain in the second treaty instead of relegating it to a place as merely another part of EU external policy.

The European negotiating team had hoped that Britain might give it some idea of what it wanted from Brexit, but as negotiations start in Brussels today, nobody on the European side seems sure what Britain actually sees as its destination.

READ MORE - UK will seek a ‘deal like no other’ on Brexit

The fallacy that appears to exist at the top levels of British government that specific deals can be done on a sector by sector basis is a dangerous one.

The EU treaties forbid member states from negotiating individual trading agreements, so the idea that German cars (many of which are manufactured outside Germany in other EU states) being sold in the Home Counties would somehow mean a good deal for the UK is a non-starter.

The second point of the Brexit manifesto – that the UK can forge trade agreements with developing economies – is also difficult to stand up.

The EU already has free trade agreements with Mexico, Chile, South Africa, South Korea, and Singapore, and is negotiating or near implementation with Canada, India and Brazil, as well as a host of developing African states.

The UK will exit the European union with potentially worse trading conditions than ever before, losing access not merely to EU markets but a host of others.

READ MORE - SNP Westminster leader: Brexit talks must involve all parties

If the UK agrees to continue cooperating with EU external trade policy as a matter of necessity to keep these markets open then it will also bind itself to the EU more generally, but without having any power within the European Commission or European Parliament.

Another major risk is that the UK share of the EU’s overall economic heft is footloose; something the EU knows.

If financial services disappear to Frankfurt or Paris, Britain does not have a resource-based economy to fall back on.

It is also neither food nor energy independent, and needs to avoid tariffs on importing both.

What Britain does have is fish, and all the fishing towns who voted to leave the EU may find out that access to UK waters is very much on the table when London has such a poor hand and lack of direction.

If Britain fails to agree a deal and really does fall out of the EU without reaching consensus, then there is no knowing what will happen.

Food prices could soar, the pound could plummet, and the UK tax base could shrink to the point that public services already under huge strain would fall apart.

Britain’s economy is so entangled with the EU that cutting it off more or less overnight would be nothing short of a catastrophe.

Hold onto your hats, because the next two years are going to be wild.

Dominic Hinde is a European correspondent and visiting researcher at the University of Edinburgh.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4479658.1498214937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479658.1498214937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A member of protocol changes the EU and British flags prior to the start of Brexit negotiations. Picture: AP/Virginia Mayo","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A member of protocol changes the EU and British flags prior to the start of Brexit negotiations. Picture: AP/Virginia Mayo","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4479658.1498214937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/popular-tourist-resort-in-mali-under-attack-1-4479319","id":"1.4479319","articleHeadline": "Popular tourist resort in Mali ‘under attack’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1497815225000 ,"articleLead": "

Suspected jihadists in Mali’s capital have attacked a resort that is popular with foreigners on the weekends.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479318.1497812182!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mali in Western Africa. Picture: Wikicommons"} ,"articleBody": "

Special forces troops freed around 20 hostages seized by the attackers, the country’s security minister has said.

“It is a jihadist attack. Malian special forces intervened and about 20 hostages have been released,” Salif Traore said.

“Unfortunately for the moment there are two dead, including a Franco-Gabonese.”

An official with the UN mission known as MINUSMA, said people had been killed and wounded at the luxury Campement de Kangaba resort area.

“It is a jihadist attack. Malian special forces intervened and about 20 hostages have been released,” Salif Traore told AFP.

“Unfortunately for the moment there are two dead, including a Franco-Gabonese.”

Officials from the French military mission in Mali, the European Union and the UN also were there this weekend, he added.

Sunday’s violence came about a week after the US State Department warned of “possible future attacks on Western diplomatic missions, other locations in Bamako that Westerners frequent”.

“I heard gunfire coming from the camp and I saw people running out of the tourist site,” said Modibo Diarra, who lives nearby.

“I learned that it was a terrorist attack.”

Malian soldiers succeeded in entering the site, according to Commandant Modibo Traore, a spokesman for the Malian special forces in the former French colony.

“The operation is ongoing and we estimate that there are between three and four assailants,” he said.

The French president’s office, the defence minister’s office and the French military would not comment immediately on the attack or on media reports saying that French forces are intervening.

The French Foreign Ministry would not say whether any French citizens were hurt or otherwise involved in the attack in the West African country.

French military spokesman Col Patrik Steiger said he had “strictly no information” about French military involvement in the incident in Bamako.

He said there are no French troops based in Bamako, but about 2,000 French troops based in northern Mali fighting Islamic extremists.

France intervened in Mali in 2013 to oust Islamic extremists who had seized control of the major northern towns the year before.

While the militants were officially ousted, they have continued to launch regular attacks on UN peacekeeping and Malian military sites.

Religious extremism in Mali once was limited to northern areas, although in recent years the jihadists have spread violence farther south, including a devastating attack on the Radisson Blu hotel in Bamako in November 2015.

That attack left 20 dead - six Malians and 14 foreigners.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Amy Watson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4479318.1497812182!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479318.1497812182!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Mali in Western Africa. Picture: Wikicommons","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mali in Western Africa. Picture: Wikicommons","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4479318.1497812182!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/canada-s-new-edinburgh-up-in-arms-over-sewer-pipe-plan-1-4478986","id":"1.4478986","articleHeadline": "Canada’s New Edinburgh up in arms over sewer pipe plan","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1497731890000 ,"articleLead": "

Residents of a Canadian town created by a Scottish stonemason in the 19th century have clashed with the local council over the construction of a sewage pipeline which they say could damage the community.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4478985.1497731894!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Construction work is underway in the Canadian town. Photograph: Louise Imbeault/New Edinburgh News"} ,"articleBody": "

Thomas McKay was born in Perth but emigrated to Canada in 1817, where he became an acclaimed stonemason and eventually created a mill town near Ottawa inspired by New Lanark which he called New Edinburgh and populated with Scots immigrants.

Now city leaders have begun construction work on a pipeline as part of the Ottawa River Action Plan – a £126 million government-funded project – which residents say could damage homes in the centre of the town and rip apart the tight-knit community created by McKay.

Joan Mason, a former president of the New Edinburgh Community Alliance and a member of the town’s heritage and development committee, said McKay’s legacy was a reminder to care about community.

Residents claim that they were not consulted on the project when it was first mooted in 2010 and instead first found out about it when contractors appeared at the door of their Victorian-era homes last autumn, wanting to photograph the inside in case of damage during the works.

“They didn’t consult with us,” Mason said. “They tick the boxes because they did have a consultation but it was held miles away and wasn’t advertised in our local papers or brought up by our local councillors. You would have had to have insider knowledge to know what was going on.”

A six-mile long tunnel is to be created through the town as part of the works, which will be dug out into a park surrounding the historic former mill buildings of McKay’s business.

“There will be diesel trucks picking up the earth and driving through tiny historic streets with heritage buildings on both sides and this will go on daily for three years,” Mason said. “There will be constant hammers which they say can go up to 130 decibels. We don’t know whether this will have an impact on our buildings.”

She said she was being forced to leave her home and spend the next year in a holiday cottage she owns.

“There are a lot of other people who are doing the same and moving away, or having to move into the city. There are only 2,000 residents in the town, if a lot of people leave for a considerable period of time, it will change things in the community.”

She added: “It’s a community that I think Thomas McKay would have been very proud of. We fight to maintain our heritage and we are very proud of our historic area.”

McKay, who was inspired by mill owner Robert Owen, made his fortune after working on the Rideau Canal and buying up lands with the proceeds, built a home for himself and his Scottish wife in New Edinburgh, near Ottawa.

The mansion, which he named Rideau Hall, is now the official residence of the Governor General of Canada.

Ziad Ghadban, manager of the Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel (CSST) project for the City of Ottawa, said: “The CSST will greatly reduce the frequency of sewage overflows entering the Ottawa River during storms while also reducing the risk of basement flooding for several low-lying neighbourhoods.

“Strict contractual constraints, pre-construction video inspections of homes and a comprehensive vibration monitoring programme will ensure the safety of heritage structures within the New Edinburgh community.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JANE BRADLEY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4478985.1497731894!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4478985.1497731894!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Construction work is underway in the Canadian town. Photograph: Louise Imbeault/New Edinburgh News","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Construction work is underway in the Canadian town. Photograph: Louise Imbeault/New Edinburgh News","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4478985.1497731894!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}