{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/joyce-mcmillan-the-two-different-faces-of-nationalism-1-4535175","id":"1.4535175","articleHeadline": "Joyce McMillan: The two different faces of ‘nationalism’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503043937000 ,"articleLead": "

History shows us national movements can be either reactionary and intolerant or progressive and inclusive, says Joyce McMillan

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535174.1503042621!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Virginia have been calling themselves white nationalists. Picture: AFP/Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

To the Festival Theatre Studio, earlier this week, to take part in one of the fascinating series of Spirit of 47 events, being staged by the Edinburgh International Festival to mark its 70th anniversary. The subject was the exclusion, from that very first official festival in 1947, of Glasgow Unity Theatre Company, with its acclaimed production of Maxim Gorky’s Lower Depths; and at the core of the debate between the first festival director Rudolph Bing and Robert Mitchell of Glasgow Unity, though, there lay a subject - and a word - that has echoed around the world this week, and sparked some special anxieties here in Scotland.

Mitchell took the view that Scottish work should be represented in the Edinburgh International Festival, not least so as to forge a link with the widest possible Scottish audience; Bing said that given his experience as a member of an Austrian Jewish family forced to flee the Nazis, he would have no truck with “nationalism” of any kind, and only wanted to help heal the wounds of Europe by presenting music, dance and drama of the highest possible standard, regardless of its origin.

And there, right at the founding moment of the Edinburgh Festival, stood the debate about “nationalism” or national identity - what we mean by it, and how it relates to the wider cause of peace, freedom and justice - that still haunts the world today. This week, we have seen neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Virginia marching behind swastikas and confederate flags, and calling themselves “white nationalists”. Yet when the BBC repeated the term, some supporters of Scottish independence - who have had a bruising year, one way and another - took profound offence, declaring that even to use the term nationalist in referring to such a bunch of overt racists was to imply that all nationalism is racist and potentially fascist, and therefore to do harm to their cause.

Now at the level of theory, there should be no difficulty in sorting out the truth - more than evident from the history of the last century - that national movements, often described as “nationalist”, can be either reactionary and intolerant or progressive and inclusive, depending on the circumstances in which they are formed. It is 40 years since the great Scottish theorist of nationalism, Tom Nairn, formulated his idea of nationalism as a “Janus-faced” phenomenon, facing both forward and backward; and if we consider the great national liberation and self-determination movements of the last 120 years, from Ireland to India and every nation that gained independence from the old European empires after the Second World War, or from the Soviet empire in 1989-90, we can see those threads of progress and reaction entwined in every one, in different proportions.

Any creed that involves one identifiable group rebelling against another group is potentially tribal or exclusive, in other words; but where that rebellion is against unjust colonial or imperial rule, against the theft and exploitation of resources and the oppression and destruction of cultures, the nationalist impulse in generally seen as a progressive one, attracting great waves of new thought about freedom and democracy, and a better life for all of the people. And of course, Scotland stands at the very heart of this maelstrom of meanings, as a small nation partly colonised itself - its culture often reduced to tartan kitsch, its best and brightest invited to make their lives elsewhere - and yet also deeply complicit in, and enriched by, the colonising project of the British empire, and the profound racist assumptions it entailed. There’s no doubt that Scotland’s sense of its own identity has sometimes taken on racist and sectarian overtones in the past; and only a fool would argue that it could never do so again, or that racist attitudes do not thrive here as elsewhere. Yet the current Scottish independence movement was forged in the fire of 1980’s opposition to Thatcherism, and then later in opposition to New Labour Blairism; and so it sees itself as a movement of the social-democratic left, taking what is - by current British standards - unusual care to express all the inclusive, anti-racist and pro-European values that should imply, including a warm welcome to migrants and refugees.

And from this, there are perhaps two things to be learned. The first is that peoples who share a place and a culture have a right to self-determination, as defined in the UN Charter, and that their “nationalism” is not always worse - and sometimes better - than the casual nationalism of big existing nation-states, which is often as complacent, intolerant and culturally arrogant as it is unnamed and unacknowledged.

And the second, and by far the most important, is that movements which claim to represent a certain people, or a certain place, have finally to be judged by their actions, and not by the words they use to define themselves. That human identities exist is undeniable; people are aware of themselves as belonging to a particular city or nation, race or culture, gender, sexuality or class. And the question for every movement that seeks to represent those strands of belonging is whether it does so in a spirit of peace, progress, and social justice, or in a spirit of aggression towards others, and of implicit or explicit threat. The people who marched in Virginia last week, with their guns, swastikas and confederate flags, clearly fail that test by any measure; people who could have chosen to fight alongside others for the economic well-being many working-class white Americans feel they have lost, but instead choose to attack their black fellow-citizens.

Whether in the United States, here in the UK, or across the rest of Europe, though, it is for the rest of us to decide whether we feel the politicians and parties we vote for are passing that test, in the way they represent our nations and communities, the language they use, and the vision they propose; and to make that decision not once and for all, but again and again, each day, with the kind of civic care and vigilance that keeps minorities safe and democracy alive, and - in the end - protects our own freedoms, at the times when we need them most.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JOYCE McMILLAN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535174.1503042621!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535174.1503042621!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Virginia have been calling themselves white nationalists. Picture: AFP/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Virginia have been calling themselves white nationalists. Picture: AFP/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535174.1503042621!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/5-terrorists-killed-as-catalan-police-stop-attack-in-cambrils-1-4535412","id":"1.4535412","articleHeadline": "‘5 terrorists killed’ as Catalan police stop attack in Cambrils","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503041912000 ,"articleLead": "

Police in Catalonia say they have thwarted another potential terrorist attack in the town of Cambrils, just hours after a vehicle attack in Barcelona killed 13 and left more than 100 injured.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535410.1503040675!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers speak near an overturned car at the spot where terrorists were intercepted by police in Cambrils. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

Five suspected terrorists, said to be wearing explosive belts, were killed by police in the town of Cambrils, around 100km south west of Barcelona.

Seven people, including one police officer, were injured when a car was driven into them in the early house of Friday.

One is reportedly in a critical condition.

READ MORE - Barcelona attack: 3 arrests, 13 dead, 100 injured

Local media reported that the vehicle overturned, and when the attackers got out of the car they were fired upon by police. A number of controlled explosions were then carried out.

Offoicers say the situation in Cambrils is now under control, and that the explosive belts were fake.

Police said the Cambrils attackers were connected to the first attack in Barcelona.

Authorities are now linking the attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils with an explosion at a house on Wednesday evening in Alcanar that left one person dead and several wounded.

Police chief Josep Lluis Trapero said that those at the house in Alcanar appeared to have been ‘preparing an explosive device’.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "PATRICK McPARTLIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535410.1503040675!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535410.1503040675!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers speak near an overturned car at the spot where terrorists were intercepted by police in Cambrils. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers speak near an overturned car at the spot where terrorists were intercepted by police in Cambrils. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535410.1503040675!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535411.1503040682!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535411.1503040682!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers check the area after police killed five attackers in Cambrils near Tarragona. Picture: AFP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers check the area after police killed five attackers in Cambrils near Tarragona. Picture: AFP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535411.1503040682!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1503041564926"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":1,"list":[ {"related": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/glasgow/traders-return-to-work-after-blochairn-fire-brought-under-control-1-4535381","name": "Traders return to work after Blochairn fire brought under control"}} ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/barcelona-attack-2-arrests-13-dead-100-injured-1-4535041","id":"1.4535041","articleHeadline": "Barcelona attack: 2 arrests, 13 dead, 100 injured","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503035874000 ,"articleLead": "

At least 13 people are dead and more than 100 injured after a van was driven into pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535153.1502991197!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Plain-clothes policemen phone as they walk past police cars in a cordoned off area. Picture: AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Police last night made two arrests and said the incident was being treated as a terrorist attack amid reports another attacker had been shot dead.

Eyewitnesses spoke of “unbridled fear” after the Fiat van crashed into crowds and swerved from side to side on the iconic thoroughfare popular with tourists yesterday afternoon.

There was panic in the hours that followed amid reports gunmen were holed up in a bar in the city centre and had taken hostages.

However, the reports were later dismissed by police who released a photograph of Moroccan-born Driss Oukabir, who is alleged to have hired the van used in the attack. It is unclear whether he is one of those arrested.

The group calling itself Islamic State has claimed responsibilty for the attack.

Catalonia’s police force, the Mossos d’Esquadra, said a man in a car which hit two of its officers at a traffic blockade in Barcelona had been shot and killed.

According to local media, a white Ford Focus ran over the officers and was then intercepted by police around two miles away.

It was not immediately apparent whether the incident was connected to the earlier attack, although bomb squad officers were last night searching the area.

READ MORE: Barcelona attack: Nicola Sturgeon expresses support for victims

The identities of those killed in Las Ramblas were not immediately known, although a Belgian national is among the dead.

Witnesses described seeing the vehicle speed through crowds on Las Ramblas without slowing down.

Tourists were forced to take shelter in nearby shops, while others reported hearing gunshots.

Tom Gueller, who lives on a road adjoining the site of the attack, was forced to flee when the vehicle began hitting pedestrians.

He said: “I heard screams and a bit of a crash and then I just saw the crowd parting and this van going full pelt down the middle of the Ramblas, and I immediately knew that it was a terrorist attack or something like that.

“I ran away, I mean I live near, I had to run back about 50 metres or so and go up to my flat and obviously see what’s happening on the road from my balcony.”

Asked about the van, he said: “It wasn’t slowing down at all. It was just going straight through the middle of the crowds in the middle of the Ramblas.”

Video captured by eyewitnesses and circulating on social media showed the bloody aftermath of the incident.

A number of victims, some bleeding heavily, were visible in one clip – lying amid piles of souvenirs apparently sent flying in the chaos.

Susan Maclean, who is on holiday in Barcelona with her husband, said she was “very lucky” to have avoided the van as it ploughed through the crowds.

She said: “All of a sudden, there was this screaming and hordes of people, like a tidal wave of people, fear etched in their faces, running towards us, many of them yelling in Spanish.

“We had no idea what was going on. My first thought was this is a terrorist attack.”

She said she felt “unbridled fear” during the incident where she was barricaded into a nearby shop for safety.

Ms Maclean said: “It was very difficult to know what was going on.

“People were shouting. We could hear the word ‘shooting, shooting’. We weren’t really sure whether that was shooting as in the English or a Spanish word so it was just unbridled fear.”

Police immediately cordoned off Las Ramblas and ordered stores and nearby Metro and train stations to close following the attack.

They asked people to stay away from the area so as not to get in the way of emergency services. A helicopter hovered over the scene.

READ MORE: Glasgow University rector Aamer Anwar caught in Barcelona attack

Meanwhile, local authorities in the small town of Vic in Catalonia said police had cordoned off the area and were inspecting another van which is thought to have been a getaway vehicle.

The attack – the first major terror-related killing on Spanish soil since more than 190 people died in the Madrid train bombs in 2004 – brought widespread condemnation.

Barcelona’s mayor, Ada Colau, tweeted in English that her city would remain “brave and united”.

She added: “Terror will never change that.”

She said a minute’s silence would be held today in Barcelona’s main square to show the city was not afraid.

In a statement, FC Barcelona, the city’s famous football club, said: “Deeply saddened by the attack on our city. All our thoughts are with the victims, their families and with the people of Barcelona.”

Spain’s royal palace also condemned the attack, calling the perpetrators “assassins, simply criminals who will not terrorise us”.

Prime Minister Theresa May said the “UK stands with Spain against terror” and President Donald Trump said the United States “will do whatever is necessary to help. Be tough & strong, we love you!”

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said her thoughts were with all those affected by the “horrific and mindless attack”.

French President Emmanuel Macron tweeted: “All my thoughts and solidarity from France for the victims of the tragic attack in Barcelona. We will remain united and determined.”

Spain has been on a security alert one step below the maximum since June 2015 following attacks elsewhere in Europe and Africa. Spanish police have also been involved in the arrests of more than 200 suspected jihadis since then.

Cars, trucks and vans have been the weapon of choice in multiple extremist attacks in Europe in the last year.

The most deadly was the driver of a tractor-trailer who targeted Bastille Day revelers in the southern French city of Nice in July 2016, killing 86 people. In December, 12 people died after a driver used a hijacked trick to drive into a Christmas market in Berlin.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Chris Marshall"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535153.1502991197!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535153.1502991197!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Plain-clothes policemen phone as they walk past police cars in a cordoned off area. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Plain-clothes policemen phone as they walk past police cars in a cordoned off area. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535153.1502991197!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535201.1502998155!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535201.1502998155!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police have released an image of a suspect following the terror attack. Picture: Handout","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police have released an image of a suspect following the terror attack. Picture: Handout","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535201.1502998155!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535152.1502991195!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535152.1502991195!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Barcelona terror atack map.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Barcelona terror atack map.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535152.1502991195!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535154.1502991199!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535154.1502991199!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Armed policemen arrive in a cordoned off area after a van ploughed into the crowd. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Armed policemen arrive in a cordoned off area after a van ploughed into the crowd. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535154.1502991199!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535155.1502991202!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535155.1502991202!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A policemen and a medical staff member stand past police cars and an ambulance in a cordoned off area after a van ploughed into the crowd. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A policemen and a medical staff member stand past police cars and an ambulance in a cordoned off area after a van ploughed into the crowd. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535155.1502991202!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1502987118379"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/hong-kong-activists-jailed-over-2014-pro-democracy-protests-1-4535206","id":"1.4535206","articleHeadline": "Hong Kong activists jailed over 2014 pro-democracy protests","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503032400000 ,"articleLead": "

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535205.1502998611!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Officers try to clear the way for a prison bus carrying Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong at the high court after sentencing in Hong Kong. Picture: AP Photo/Vincent Yu"} ,"articleBody": "

A young activist and two other student leaders were jailed yesterday for their roles in Hong Kong’s huge pro-democracy protests in 2014 after a court overturned their previous sentences which were ruled to be too lenient.

The city’s High Court overturned the earlier verdict that let Joshua Wong, Nathan Law and Alex Chow avoid prison, agreeing with prosecutors that the original punishment for joining or leading an unlawful assembly that sparked the protests was too light.

They were immediately taken to serve their sentences of up to eight months, which have the added consequence of blocking them from seeking public office for five years.

Wong pumped his fist in the air as he walked out of the dock into custody and tweeted soon after: “You can lock up our bodies, but not our minds! We want democracy in Hong Kong. And we will not give up.

“See you soon,” he added.

The three were found guilty last year of leading or encouraging an illegal rally in September 2014 that kicked off the “Umbrella Movement” protests that captured world headlines.

Youthful activists brought major thoroughfares to a standstill for 11 weeks to protest against Beijing’s plan to restrict elections in the Chinese-ruled former British colony.

Wong and Law were originally given community service and Chow had received a suspended three-week prison sentence.

A three-judge panel yesterday decided to stiffen those sentences following a prosecution request.

The judges, who said there was a need to deter others, gave Law eight months in prison, seven to Chow and six for Wong, following deductions that included one-month cuts in sentences for the community service Wong and Law completed.

The case raises fears that Hong Kong’s independent judiciary is under threat as the city’s Beijing-backed government uses the courts to clamp down on the opposition and constrain its ability to protest.

The ruling is a setback for the city’s next generation of pro-democracy political leaders, because it prevents the movement’s most charismatic leaders from running for office. Anyone sentenced to three months or more in prison can’t stand for public office for five years.

Last year, Law became the youngest person to be elected to the city’s legislature at the age of 23, but was among half a dozen lawmakers later disqualified for using their oaths to make apparent protests against Beijing.

Wong, 20, also spoke of his desire to stand for election but is still too young.

Before the ruling, Wong, who became famous for his role in the protests because he was just 17 and still in high school at the time, was defiant in a speech to the media.

“People united will never be defeated,” Wong said outside the courthouse flanked by his co-defendants. He vowed they would continue “this long battle” for freedom and democracy.

“Time is on our side and one day Hong Kong will be a place we can determine our own future. We love Hong Kong,” he said as a rival, pro-Beijing protester chanted nearby.

The appeal judges at the High Court had been expected to send the three to prison, following their decision in a similar case this week involving 13 activists given eight to 13 months’ jail time after their original community-service sentences were overturned.

Wong had been preparing himself for such a possibility and tweeted earlier to his followers that they shouldn’t abandon the movement.

“When those of us who face jail time have yet to give up, how can the rest of you give up?” wrote Wong, who is now in university.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "KELVIN CHAN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535205.1502998611!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535205.1502998611!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Officers try to clear the way for a prison bus carrying Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong at the high court after sentencing in Hong Kong. Picture: AP Photo/Vincent Yu","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Officers try to clear the way for a prison bus carrying Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong at the high court after sentencing in Hong Kong. Picture: AP Photo/Vincent Yu","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535205.1502998611!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/us-strategist-steve-bannon-no-military-answer-to-north-korea-1-4535208","id":"1.4535208","articleHeadline": "US strategist Steve Bannon: ‘No military answer to North Korea’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503032400000 ,"articleLead": "

President Donald Trump’s chief strategist Steve Bannon says there’s no military solution to the threat posed by North Korea and its nuclear ambitions, despite the president’s recent pledge to answer further aggression with “fire and fury.”

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535207.1502998917!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Donald Trump with White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon (right). Picture: Drew Angerer/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

In an interview with The American Prospect posted online, Bannon tells the liberal publication that the US is losing the economic race against China. He also talks about purging his rivals from the Defence and State departments.

Bannon is also asked about the white supremacist movement, whose march on Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend led to deadly violence. He dismisses them as “losers,” “a fringe element” and “a collection of clowns”.

The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

“There’s no military solution [to North Korea’s nuclear threats], forget it,” Mr Bannon says.

“Until somebody solves the part of the equation that shows me that 10 million people in Seoul don’t die in the first 30 minutes from conventional weapons, I don’t know what you’re talking about, there’s no military solution here, they got us.”

Trump tweeted earlier y that North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “made a very wise and well-reasoned decision” by backing down after heightening fears of nuclear conflict in a series of combative threats, including against the US territory of Guam.

Mr Bannon also outlined his push for the US to adopt a tougher stance on China trade, without waiting to see whether Beijing will help restrain Kim, as Trump has pressed China’s leader to do.

Trump also has lamented US trade deficits with China. “The economic war with China is everything,” Mr Bannon says.

“And we have to be maniacally focused on that. If we continue to lose it, we’re five years away, I think,ten years at the most, of hitting an inflection point from which we’ll never be able to recover.”

Bannon was a key general election campaign adviser and has been a forceful but contentious presence in a divided White House. The former leader of conservative Breitbart News, Bannon has drawn fire from some of Trump’s closest advisers, including son-in-law Jared Kushner.

The president is under renewed pressure to fire Bannon, who has survived earlier rounds of having fallen out of favour with Trump. 
Earlier this week, the president passed up an opportunity to offer a public vote of confidence in Bannon. Trump said he’s a “good person” and not a racist, adding that “we’ll see what happens with Mr. Bannon.”

The latest anti-Bannon campaign comes as Trump faces mounting criticism for insisting that white supremacist groups and those who opposed them were both at fault for deadly violence last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia.

In the interview, Bannon muses about getting rid of administration officials who disagree with his strategy toward China and North Korea and replacing them with “hawks”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "DARLENE SUPERVILLE"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535207.1502998917!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535207.1502998917!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "President Donald Trump with White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon (right). Picture: Drew Angerer/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Donald Trump with White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon (right). Picture: Drew Angerer/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535207.1502998917!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/leader-comment-attack-underlines-need-for-security-measures-1-4535237","id":"1.4535237","articleHeadline": "Leader comment: Attack underlines need for security measures","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1503001420000 ,"articleLead": "

A suspected terrorist hires a van, and ploughs it into tourists on a popular thoroughfare, with devastating effect. If the early details available from yesterday’s attack in Barcelona are accurate, then the incident follows a pattern with which we are all too familiar. It’s the sixth use of a vehicle in a deadly attack in the last six months.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535236.1503001428!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Injured people are treated in Barcelona after yesterday's attack on Las Ramblas. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The famous Las Ramblas boulevard is possibly one of the softest targets in Europe when faced by such a threat, but it doesn’t take much of a stretch of the imagination to identify similar circumstances closer to home.

Once more, our politicians condemn the attack, and once more they state that the terrorists will not win. They may well be right, but we have no reason to believe that we will not be shocked by a further attack before much longer. Sadly, there will be more casualties before this threat is contained, if that is in fact possible.

Spain is no stranger to terror attacks, but there has always been the option of talking with Basque group ETA. This new enemy cannot be negotiated with; we barely know who the enemy is, never mind where to find them.

The nature of these vehicle attacks make them virtually impossible to defend ourselves against, although if there is any consolation, it is that terrorists appear – at the moment – to be unable to inflict the number of casualties they would want to wipe out. While the vehicle attack is effective and devastating, its scope tends to be relatively limited compared to the kind of carnage alternative methods can achieve.

Our only option is to continue to put in place preventative measures in places where we think the threat is greatest, even though we know that there are too many potential targets to defend effectively. Every city has crowded streets that are shared with traffic.

For some, the anti-terror barriers put up in Edinburgh this month to protect festival crowds were an intrusion – some would even suggest they are futile – and a curtailment on the sense of freedom that is enjoyed in the city at this time of year. The reality is, however, that more of these intrusions may be required in the future, whether we like it or not.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535236.1503001428!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535236.1503001428!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Injured people are treated in Barcelona after yesterday's attack on Las Ramblas. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Injured people are treated in Barcelona after yesterday's attack on Las Ramblas. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535236.1503001428!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/barcelona-attack-nicola-sturgeon-expresses-support-for-victims-1-4535204","id":"1.4535204","articleHeadline": "Barcelona attack: Nicola Sturgeon expresses support for victims","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502998172000 ,"articleLead": "

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has urged people in Barcelona to “stay safe” following the terror attack in the Spanish city.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535202.1502998179!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A driver deliberately rammed a van into a crowd on Barcelona's most popular stree. Picture: JOSEP LAGO/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

READ MORE - Barcelona attack: Man arrested after 13 people killed

Twelve people have been killed and 80 injured after a white van careered into a crowd in La Rambla district of Barcelona.

The street is popular with tourists due to its variety of market stalls, bars and restaurants.

Police have arrested one person in connection with the attack.

Sturgeon expressed her condolences to all those affected, including Glasgow University rector Aamer Anwar who was in the city for a conference. He was in the area at the time of the attack.

She tweeted: “My thoughts are with everyone affected by the horrific and mindless attack in Barcelona.

“Also thinking of my good pal @AamerAnwar who, with many others, witnessed the attack in Barcelona. Stay safe.”

The attack - the first major terror-related killing on Spanish soil since more than 190 people died in the Madrid train bombs in 2004 - brought widespread condemnation.

Mrs May denounced the “terrible” assault in the Spanish city which saw a van plough into pedestrians and follows a spate of similar attacks in London in recent months.

She said: “My thoughts are with the victims of today’s terrible attack in Barcelona and the emergency services responding to this ongoing incident.

“The UK stands with Spain against terror.”

READ MORE - Glasgow University rector Aamer Anwar caught in Barcelona attack

Meanwhile, US president Donald Trump wrote on Twitter: “The United States condemns the terror attack in Barcelona, Spain, and will do whatever is necessary to help. Be tough & strong, we love you!”

Sadiq Khan said London stood with Barcelona “against the evil terrorism” following recent attacks in Westminster, London Bridge and Finsbury Park.

Mr Khan wrote on Twitter: “My thoughts are with the victims of this barbaric terrorist attack in the great city of Barcelona and with their brave emergency services.

“London stands with Barcelona against the evil of terrorism.”

A number of other high-profile figures also voiced support for the Barcelona victims.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn tweeted: “Terrible reports from Barcelona. My thoughts are with those killed and injured, and the emergency services working to save lives.”

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: “Concerned and saddened by #Barcelona attack. Our thoughts are with those affected. Doing all we can to identify whether Brits need help.”

US First Lady Melania Trump wrote: “Thoughts and prayers to #Barcelona.”

Barcelona FC said it was “deeply saddened” by the attack, while their rivals Real Madrid expressed “solidarity with the victims and their families and friends”.

Former England striker Gary Lineker, who played for Barcelona for three seasons from 1986-89, tweeted: “Deeply saddened to hear about the attack in the wonderful city of Barcelona. What purpose this barbarity serves is beyond comprehension.”

Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola, a former Barcelona midfielder and coach, said: “All at MCFC are saddened to hear of the attack in the City of Barcelona. Our thoughts are with all affected and the emergency services.”

Spanish tennis champion Rafael Nadal, whose uncle Miguel Angel Nadal used to play for Barcelona, said: “Shattered by what has happened in Barcelona! All my support for the families affected and the city.” Sue Murphy, deputy leader of Manchester City Council, said: “Our hearts go out to Barcelona in the wake of this sickening incident.

“Manchester stands in solidarity with that great city. We know from recent experience both how devastating this sort of attack is and how important international solidarity, community spirit and a refusal to give in to terror are in dealing with its aftermath.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535202.1502998179!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535202.1502998179!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A driver deliberately rammed a van into a crowd on Barcelona's most popular stree. Picture: JOSEP LAGO/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A driver deliberately rammed a van into a crowd on Barcelona's most popular stree. Picture: JOSEP LAGO/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535202.1502998179!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1502987118379"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/glasgow-university-rector-aamer-anwar-caught-in-barcelona-attack-1-4535194","id":"1.4535194","articleHeadline": "Glasgow University rector Aamer Anwar caught in Barcelona attack","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502996091000 ,"articleLead": "

Glasgow University rector Aamer Anwar was caught up in the terrorist attack in Barcelona.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535193.1502996374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Aamer Anwar was caught up in the Barcelona terrorist attack. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

READ MORE - Barcelona attack: Manhunt underway after 13 people killed

Anwar, who was in the city for a human rights conference, was walking in the popular thoroughfare La Rambla when he heard the screaming.

The human rights lawyer talked of the “chaos” which surrounded him.

Twelve people have been killed with 80 hospitalised after a white van ploughed into a crowd in La Rambla district. Located in the centre of the city, the area is populated with market stalls, bars and restaurants, attracting many tourists.

Police have arrested one man linked to at attack.

Mr Anwar said: “I had been to the Cathedral and walking down Las Ramblas for something to eat. Part of it was in the shade so I decided to keep walking down and literally within 10 seconds there was a crashing noise.

“I turned around and people were screaming - I could see a woman screaming with her kids - people started running and jumping into shops. I ran for about 50 or 100 metres and stopped to see what was happening. The police were very quickly on the scene and getting people to move back.

“I could see chaos right at the top area and I spoke to a shopkeeper who had run down and was screaming. He was Bengali so I spoke to him in Urdu and he said a van had driven into a crowd and he thought there were five to six people very seriously injured.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4535193.1502996374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4535193.1502996374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Aamer Anwar was caught up in the Barcelona terrorist attack. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Aamer Anwar was caught up in the Barcelona terrorist attack. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4535193.1502996374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/bbc-discrediting-snp-over-charlottesville-nationalists-1-4534044","id":"1.4534044","articleHeadline": "BBC ‘discrediting SNP’ over Charlottesville ‘nationalists’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502902494000 ,"articleLead": "

Supporters of Scottish independence have accused the BBC of seeking to discredit the SNP by calling far-right demonstrators who provoked the Charlottesville unrest “white nationalists.”

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4468265.1502902463!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Supporters of Scottish independence have accused the BBC of seeking to discredit the SNP Picture: Robert Perry/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

James Cook, the BBC’s North America Correspondent, was forced to reject an “Orwellian” attempt to censor use of a widely-understood term.

Since the fatal rally, the BBC has been target of tweets such as “Can’t believe the BBC invented nazism to discredit the SNP.”

Cook, a former BBC Scotland Correspondent who played a prominent role reporting the independence referendum, responded to the allegations on Twitter. “US readers may be startled to learn that some Scottish nationalists say our use of ‘white nationalist’ is designed to discredit the SNP,” he wrote.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon: Trump visit ‘unthinkable’ after Charlottesville

Cook, a former BBC Scotland Correspondent who played a prominent role reporting the independence referendum, responded to the allegations on Twitter.

“US readers may be startled to learn that some Scottish nationalists say our use of ‘white nationalist’ is designed to discredit the SNP,” he wrote.

Cook wrote: “Should we stop using ‘white nationalists’ in US because a tiny number of folk are offended? No, that would be absurd and Orwellian.”

READ MORE: Andrew O’Hagan: Britain “smashed” by Brexit and Scotland under threat

He conceded that “why we call Scottish nationalists ‘nationalists’ while labelling British nationalists ‘unionists’ is a fair question.”

“Both sides have happily used these terms to describe themselves for many years.”

The BBC reporter wrote: “I have never tried to compare the ‘yes’ movement to Nazis and I don’t know of any BBC colleague who has done so either.”

He had not simply used the word “nationalist” in his Charlottesville comments.

“We’ve been discussing the phrase ‘white nationalist’. But I do prefer, on most occasions, white supremacists as a term.”

Cook has used “Nazis” and “fascists” to describe the groups who praised President Trump’s pugilistic press conference on Tuesday night.

“Is ‘nationalist’ an inherently damaging term?,” Cook asked.

“I don’t think so. Is it useful? Not without context which we should try to spell out.”

SNP politicians entered the debate. Former MP John Nicolson said: “I suspect that were one to start from scratch one might have adopted another name. Scottish Democrats; “fellow Democrats” would work for me.”

SNP MP Peter Grant told Cook: “UK parties falsely equate nationalism with racism to discredit the SNP, then can’t accept that they are nationalists as well.”

This story originally featured on our sister site: iNews.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ADAM SHERWIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4468265.1502902463!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4468265.1502902463!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Supporters of Scottish independence have accused the BBC of seeking to discredit the SNP Picture: Robert Perry/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Supporters of Scottish independence have accused the BBC of seeking to discredit the SNP Picture: Robert Perry/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4468265.1502902463!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1502900236572"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/brexit-uk-ministers-propose-unmonitored-irish-border-post-1-4534011","id":"1.4534011","articleHeadline": "Brexit: UK ministers propose ‘unmonitored’ Irish border post","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502901091000 ,"articleLead": "

The UK Government has set out its vision of a free-flowing and unmonitored Irish border post-Brexit, with the majority of local businesses avoiding customs tariffs.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531111.1502901057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May has said she does not want a return to "the borders of the past" in Ireland. Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The proposals outlined in a Whitehall position paper add some detail to Prime Minister Theresa May’s oft-repeated pledge to avoid a hardening of the border.

While the return of Troubles-era check points along the UK’s only land border with the EU has long been considered a non-runner by the Government, there was an expectation it would seek to use technology to monitor major crossings along the 300-mile frontier.

But that was not the stance adopted in Wednesday’s position paper. Confounding expectations, it instead stated a desire to avoid any physical infrastructure whatsoever, with officials confirming that meant no CCTV cameras or number plate recognition systems.

Mrs May said: “As we look forward to Brexit, of course, we do want to ensure that we don’t see a return to the borders of the past, we don’t see a return to a hard border, and that we are able to ensure that the crucial flow of goods and people between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland is able to continue in the future.”

The plan will only become reality if the UK can convince EU negotiators it is feasible and in the interests of the 27 remaining member states.

Resolving the challenges around the Irish border is one of three main ‘phase one’ issues in the Brexit negotiations, along with citizens rights and the financial exit settlement.

READ MORE: Andrew O’Hagan: Britain “smashed” by Brexit and Scotland under threat

The EU 27 will decide in a crunch Brussels summit in October if sufficient progress has been made on all three to widen negotiations to issues such as future trading relations.

In respect of those relations, the document proposes a customs arrangement that would see 80 per cent of businesses on the island of Ireland entirely exempt from any new tariffs post-Brexit.

The exemption would apply to small and medium-sized enterprises involved in localised cross-border trade.

In respect of larger companies engaged in international trade, the Government suggests they could adhere to any new customs regime by completing retrospective declarations either online or at their premises.

Officials concede that the proposals could be open to fraud - with Great Britain or continental European-based companies using Irish business counterparts to avoid tariffs - but they believe those risks can be managed effectively.

The Government paper again dismissed any suggestion a customs border could be shifted to the Irish Sea, with checks and tariffs only in operation at entry and exit points between the island of Ireland and Great Britain.

If the EU signed off the UK’s ultimate customs objective - a partnership deal with the UK mirroring Europe’s tariff system, as set out in a separate position paper on Tuesday - then no Irish companies would be subject to new checks as a consequence of Brexit.

The paper also reaffirms the Government’s stated commitment to maintain the almost century-old Common Travel Area (CTA), which allows UK and Irish citizens to travel, work, study, vote and claim benefits in both jurisdictions.

In addition, it advocates the retention of rights enshrined under the 1998 Good Friday peace accord, such as the right of nationalists living in Northern Ireland to claim Irish, and consequently EU, citizenship.

The Government has also committed to explore ways to maintain funding for peace-building initiatives in Northern Ireland that is currently provided by the EU - to the tune of two billion euro since 1995.

Northern Ireland Secretary James Brokenshire said: “The paper provides flexible and imaginative ideas and demonstrates our desire to find a practical solution that recognises the unique economic, social and cultural context of the land border with Ireland, without creating any new obstacles to trade within the UK.”

There was a mixed reaction to the Government’s proposals.

Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney said the paper was “timely and helpful”.

He welcomed elements of it but said “significant questions” still remain.

Mr Coveney warned that delivering on the “aspirations” within the customs and border position papers would be difficult.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon dismisses UK Brexit customs deal as ‘daft’

“There are still significant questions in terms of how we are going to manage and remain as close as possible to the status quo on the island of Ireland in terms of the free movement of goods and services, and ensure we maintain an invisible border on the island of Ireland as you move north and south seamlessly as you do today - that is the manifestation and evidence of a successful peace process,” he said.

The senior Dublin government minister also made clear Ireland would be robustly pressing for an outcome that suited its citizens.

“From that point of view we won’t be picking fights for the sake of it but we will be firm and clear in terms of what we regard is important and essential for Ireland to be able to support a future deal,” he added.

Democratic Unionist leader and former Stormont first minister Arlene Foster described the paper as a “constructive step”.

“It is clear the Government has listened to voices in Belfast, Dublin, Brussels and London about how the United Kingdom’s only EU land border could be managed after we exit the EU,” she said.

Sinn Fein’s Stormont leader Michelle O’Neill said the proposals were “big on aspiration but light on clarity”.

Mrs O’Neill claimed the UK Government had only a “fleeting concern” on how Brexit could affect Northern Ireland and suggested it was using the region to gain leverage in the wider negotiations with Brussels.

“What the British Government are doing is treating us as collateral damage,” she said.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn called for further detail.

“Obviously in leaving the European Union it’s going to be a problem and no-one wants a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic, we certainly don’t and I hope there can now be negotiations to make sure there is a continuation of free movement between Northern Ireland and the Republic,” he said.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ANGUS HOWARTH"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531111.1502901057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531111.1502901057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May has said she does not want a return to "the borders of the past" in Ireland. Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May has said she does not want a return to "the borders of the past" in Ireland. Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531111.1502901057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1502800394978"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/nicola-sturgeon-trump-visit-unthinkable-after-charlottesville-1-4533962","id":"1.4533962","articleHeadline": "Nicola Sturgeon: Trump visit ‘unthinkable’ after Charlottesville","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502900693000 ,"articleLead": "

A state visit to Britain by Donald Trump should be “unthinkable” in light of his response to deadly violence in Virginia, Nicola Sturgeon has said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533961.1502900411!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has hit out at the prospect of a state visit to Britain by President Donald Trump. Picture: Andy Thompson Photography"} ,"articleBody": "

Scotland’s First Minister joined calls for Theresa May to withdraw the honour after the US president failed to condemn racist protesters in Charlottesville.

Ms Sturgeon said Mr Trump was “on the wrong side” of the debate after he appeared to equate the actions of far-right and counter protesters.

READ MORE: Donald Trump under fire for white supremacist violence response

Civil rights activist Heather Heyer, 32, died when a car was driven into crowds as anti-fascist demonstrators clashed with the white supremacists on Saturday.

Mr Trump has been heavily criticised at home and abroad after suggesting there were some “very fine people, on both sides”.

Speaking to LBC radio, Ms Sturgeon said many people would be “deeply disturbed” by the comments.

READ MORE: Campaign to halt Donald Trump’s Menie golf course expansion

She said: “You cannot draw an equivalence between far-right Nazis, people who peddle hate and racism and bigotry, and those who protest against that kind of ideology, and when you’ve got the former leader of the Ku Klux Klan praising the president’s comments, I think it is time for him to perhaps reflect that he is on the wrong side of this debate.

“I know there is a convention that leaders in one country will not comment on the comments or the actions of leaders in another country, but some issues are too fundamental for diplomatic silence.

“It matters to all of us across the world that we stand up and are counted to combat the ideology of the far-right, and I think that’s a responsibility of all of us.

“I never thought it was the right thing to announce a state visit at the time that Theresa May did, but I think the idea, at the moment, of president Trump making a state visit to the UK is unthinkable and perhaps it is time for the Prime Minister just to put that beyond doubt, that given these controversies, given some of the issues that are to the fore in America, now would certainly not be the time.”

On Twitter, Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson said: “The President of the United States has just turned his face to the world to defend Nazis, fascists and racists. For shame.”

Theresa May criticised Donald Trump for not singling out white supremacists for criticism following deadly unrest in Virginia, insisting there is “no equivalence” between fascists and their opponents.

The Prime Minister spoke out after the US President failed to condemn far-right demonstrators outright for violence in Charlottesville in which a woman was killed.

Mr Trump claimed “there is blame on all sides”, apparently equating the actions of far-right demonstrators with those protesting against them.

But Mrs May said: “I see no equivalence between those who propound fascist views and those who oppose them. I think it is important for all those in positions of responsibility to condemn far-right views wherever we hear them.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CATRIONA WEBSTER"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533961.1502900411!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533961.1502900411!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has hit out at the prospect of a state visit to Britain by President Donald Trump. Picture: Andy Thompson Photography","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has hit out at the prospect of a state visit to Britain by President Donald Trump. Picture: Andy Thompson Photography","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533961.1502900411!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1502900236572"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/daniel-craig-to-return-as-007-james-bond-for-one-last-time-1-4533373","id":"1.4533373","articleHeadline": "Daniel Craig to return as 007 James Bond for one last time","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502879914000 ,"articleLead": "

ACTOR Daniel Craig has confirmed he will return as the next James Bond - but said he hopes to “go out on a high note” as it will likely be his last.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533372.1502879882!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Daniel Craig to return as Bond. Picture: Supplied"} ,"articleBody": "

The 49-year-old made the announcement while appearing on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.

Craig was met with rapturous applause as he replied “yes” when the US presenter asked if he will play the next Bond.

READ MORE: James Bond to return to screens in November 2019

He said he believes the film, which is due out in 2019, will be his final time as the agent.

He added: “I think this is it. I just want to go out on a high note and I can’t wait.”

Craig said he “couldn’t be happier” over the announcement and addressed the time he told an interviewer he would rather “rather slash my wrists” than play the agent again.

He said: “There’s no point in making excuses about it but it was two days after I finished shooting the last movie. I went into an interview and someone said, ‘Would you do another one?’

“Instead of saying something with style and grace, I gave a really stupid answer.”

Within the last few days he has been saying no deal had yet been struck over the next 007 instalment but he told Colbert he had known for a “couple of months”.

READ MORE: Could this be the first female James Bond

He had told US radio station Magic that he would “love to do it” but was weighing up “personal decisions”.

Craig has so far appeared in four Bond films - Casino Royale, Quantum Of Solace, Skyfall and Spectre.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALISTAIR MUNRO"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533372.1502879882!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533372.1502879882!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Daniel Craig to return as Bond. Picture: Supplied","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Daniel Craig to return as Bond. Picture: Supplied","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533372.1502879882!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/bouncing-bombs-from-argyll-loch-being-donated-to-museums-1-4533341","id":"1.4533341","articleHeadline": "‘Bouncing bombs’ from Argyll loch being donated to museums","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502878358000 ,"articleLead": "

BOUNCING bombs used during training for the famous WWII Dambusters raids have been raised from a Scottish loch - and will now be donated to two museums in time of the 75th anniversary of the historic event.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533338.1502878208!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Highball bouncing bomb being raised from Loch Striven. Picture: Henry Paisey/Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

A specialised piece of underwater scanning equipment was used to locate and identify the ‘Highball bombs’ at Loch Striven in Argyll.

GSE Rentals, part of Unique System UK provided the scanning equipment and engineering support to produce sonar images of the sea bed at the dive site currently being explored by the British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC).

The scuba divers have completed the daring mission to raise two historic ‘Highball’ bouncing bombs like those used by the Dambusters squadron on the successful raid of the Eder Dam.

READ MORE: Teams to search Scottish loch for Dambusters bouncing bombs

Footage of the Highball bombs being tested was used in the WWII film classic, The Dambusters.

The iconic bombs were recovered in perfect condition by divers, thanks to the technical input from Unique Group.

The Dambusters raid, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, took place on 16 May 1943, when Lancaster bombers from the RAF’s 617 Squadron dropped the bomb on the Mohne, Sorpe and Eder Dams in the Ruhr Valley.

The aim of the vital operation was to disrupt industry in a key area for the manufacture of Germany’s war munitions.

A smaller bouncing bomb designed to destroy ships was also developed and tested in Scotland. The Highball, also invented by Sir Barnes Wallis, aimed to sink the German battleship Tirpitz, berthed in a Norwegian fjord.

Mosquitos dropped between 120 and 200 of the bombs on Loch Striven, in Argyll. They targeted a disused battleship in the loch ahead of the planned attack on the Tirpitz. The spherical bombs – measuring a metre across – were never used in war and no complete example exists in any museum for display. But millions of people have seen them as footage of bombs skipping over Loch Striven used in the Dambusters movie.

Mike Osterberger, Unique Group’s senior engineer, said, “We are pleased that the quality of the images allowed us to identify not only a debris field with a number of Highballs but additional debris that we believe to be side charges from the X Craft type submarine.”

The scanner was pulled by a workboat from fellow Scottish company Aspect Surveys. Sub Sea Tooling Services based near Aberdeen also provided an underwater ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) to assist with filming the searches.

READ MORE: Time-travelling hiker is walking 5,000 years of history

Around 200 Highballs have lain at the bottom of Loch Striven in Argyll, for almost 75 years since they were tested by the Royal Navy for use against enemy ships and for the Eder Dam raid in the Second World War.

The bombs, which are inactive, were secured by the divers ready for lifting by the Royal Navy and then winched to the surface before being packed, ready for transport in wet tanks containing a special salt-water solution to prevent them from corroding.

Now the aim is to donate the Highballs to two museums so they can be put on display to the public, in time for the 75th anniversary of the Dambusters raid, in 2018.

The Highballs were the naval or anti-ship version of the cylindrical shaped Upkeep bouncing bombs which were used by the Royal Air Force in the actual Dambusters raid in May 1943, both having been designed by Sir Barnes Wallis to bounce over water.

However, it is archive footage of the Highballs being tested at Loch Striven which feature in the 1955 ‘The Dam Busters’ film, as footage of the actual dams bomb used by the RAF was still top secret.

More than 200 of the bombs, codenamed Highball by the military, were tested at Loch Striven.

They were intended to be used on enemy ships but never became operational and they lay scattered on the floor of the loch for three-quarters of a century.The project has received backing from Mary Stopes-Roe the daughter of late British engineer, Sir Barnes Wallis, who invented Britain’s bouncing bombs including the Highballs.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALISTAIR MUNRO"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533338.1502878208!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533338.1502878208!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Highball bouncing bomb being raised from Loch Striven. Picture: Henry Paisey/Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Highball bouncing bomb being raised from Loch Striven. Picture: Henry Paisey/Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533338.1502878208!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533340.1502878273!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533340.1502878273!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A Lancaster bomber from the Dambusters raids. Picture: PA Photo","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A Lancaster bomber from the Dambusters raids. Picture: PA Photo","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533340.1502878273!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/donald-trump-claims-blame-on-both-sides-in-charlottesville-1-4533222","id":"1.4533222","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump claims ‘blame on both sides’ in Charlottesville","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502870324000 ,"articleLead": "

A combative President Donald Trump has again insisted “there is blame on both sides” for the deadly weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533220.1502870279!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump has again insisted that there is 'blame on both sides' for the Charlottesville violence. Picture: AFP"} ,"articleBody": "

He appeared to once again equate the actions of white supremacist groups and those protesting against them, and showed sympathy for the fringe groups’ efforts to preserve Confederate monuments.

The president’s comments effectively wiped away his more conventional statement a day earlier when he branded members of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who take part in violence as “criminals and thugs.”

Mr Trump’s advisers had hoped those remarks might quell heavy criticism from Republicans, Democrats and business leaders.

But the president’s retorts on Tuesday suggested he had been a reluctant participant in that clean-up effort and renewed questions about why he seems to struggle to unequivocally condemn white nationalists.

There was renewed criticism, including from fellow Republicans. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida said Mr Trump should not allow white supremacists “to share only part of the blame”.

House Speaker Paul Ryan declared “white supremacy is repulsive” and there should be “no moral ambiguity”.

Mr Trump’s remarks were welcomed by former KKK leader David Duke, who tweeted: “Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth.”

Violence broke out on Saturday in Charlottesville after a mix of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right extremists assembled to protest against the city’s decision to remove a towering statue of Confederate General Robert E Lee.

Heather Heyer, 32, was killed when a man ploughed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters.

In the immediate aftermath, Mr Trump placed the blame on “many sides”, and on Monday, at the urging of his aides, he delivered a more direct condemnation of white supremacists.

But he returned to his original arguments on Tuesday during an impromptu press conference in the lobby of his Manhattan skyscraper, declaring “there are two sides to a story”.

He acknowledged there were “some very bad people” looking for trouble in the group protesting against plans to remove the statue.

“But you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides,” he said.

The president sided with those seeking to maintain the monument to Lee, equating him with some of the nation’s founders who also owned slaves.

“Confederate monuments have become rallying points for supporters of both preserving and toppling them.

“So, this week it’s Robert E Lee,” he said. “I noticed that Stonewall Jackson’s coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after?

“You really do have to ask yourself where does it stop? You’re changing history. You’re changing culture.”

The president’s comments mirrored rhetoric from the far-right fringe. A post on Monday by the publisher of The Daily Stormer, a notorious neo-Nazi website, predicted that protesters are going to demand the Washington Monument be torn down.

Mr Trump’s handling of the weekend violence has raised new and troubling questions, even among some supporters.

Members of his own Republican Party have pressured him to be more vigorous in criticising bigoted groups, and business leaders have begun abandoning a White House jobs panel in response to his comments.

Democrats were aghast at Mr Trump’s comments, with Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia saying on Twitter the Charlottesville violence “was fuelled by one side: white supremacists spreading racism, intolerance & intimidation.

“Those are the facts.”

Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii said: “As a Jew, as an American, as a human, words cannot express my disgust and disappointment. This is not my president.”

Mr Trump, who has quickly deemed other deadly incidents in the US and around the world acts of terrorism, waffled when asked whether the car death was a terrorist attack.

He said: “There is a question. Is it murder? Is it terrorism? And then you get into legal semantics. The driver of the car is a murderer and what he did was a horrible, horrible, inexcusable thing.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "MARGARET NEIGHBOUR"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533220.1502870279!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533220.1502870279!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "US President Donald Trump has again insisted that there is 'blame on both sides' for the Charlottesville violence. Picture: AFP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump has again insisted that there is 'blame on both sides' for the Charlottesville violence. Picture: AFP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533220.1502870279!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4533221.1502870292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4533221.1502870292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Protesters in Minneapolis carry an image of Heather Heyer during a demonstration against racism and the violence in Charlottesville. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Protesters in Minneapolis carry an image of Heather Heyer during a demonstration against racism and the violence in Charlottesville. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4533221.1502870292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/1-dead-13-hurt-after-man-rams-car-into-restaurant-near-paris-1-4532163","id":"1.4532163","articleHeadline": "1 dead, 13 hurt after man rams car into restaurant near Paris","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502780687000 ,"articleLead": "

A man believed to be under the influence of drugs deliberately rammed his car into a pizza restaurant east of Paris on Monday night, killing an adolescent girl and injuring her younger brother and 12 others, authorities said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4532162.1502780655!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police block a road near where a man rammed a car into a pizza restaurant near Paris. Picture: AFP"} ,"articleBody": "

The driver was immediately arrested in what was the latest of several attacks in France and elsewhere using a vehicle as a weapon.

The local prosecutor said the man’s actions in the dinnertime attack in the town of Sept-Sorts were clearly deliberate, but not terrorism-related.

The girl and her brother were among restaurant patrons eating on the outdoor terrace of Pizzeria Cesena when a man in a BMW accelerated toward them, an official with the national gendarme service said.

Some officials said the girl was 13, while the prosecutor said she was 12.

The girl died immediately, and her brother’s injuries were life-threatening, according to a gendarme official, who was not authorised to be quoted by name.

Deputy regional prosecutor Eric de Valroger said a three-year-old boy was flown by helicopter to France’s leading children’s hospital in Paris and 12 other people were also hospitalised, with four in serious condition.

Speaking to reporters near the attack site, de Valroger said he had opened a homicide investigation. At this stage, he said, “I rule out a terrorist motive.”

He called it ‘highly probable’ that the driver was under the influence of drugs and that he left the road and deliberately aimed his car at restaurant-goers.

De Valroger identified the attacker as a 31-year-old from the nearby town of La Ferte-sous-Jouarre.

The suspect is believed to have tried to kill himself last week, French Interior Ministry Pierre-Henry Brandet said on BFM television. Brandet said the man was not known to intelligence or police.

Explosives experts combed the area and found no weapon other than the car itself, according to the prosecutor.

Witnesses to the incident were being given emergency counseling.

A police official said authorities were not searching for accomplices, and a security official said there was no evidence of a political or Islamic extremist motive.

The targeted pizzeria is in a shopping zone in the small town of Sept-Sorts, about 40 miles east of Paris. Police cordoned off a large area, and BFM reported that a nearby Chinese restaurant was requisitioned to take in victims and survivors.

The incident on a quiet August night on the eve of a national holiday reignited fears after multiple attacks in which a vehicle was the weapon of choice.

An Algerian man with unclear motives drove his car into a group of French soldiers last week, and an Islamic extremist truck attack in the French city of Nice left 86 people dead a little more than a year ago.

French President Emmanuel Macron and his government expressed condolences and support for the victims and survivors of Monday’s attack, according to an Interior Ministry statement.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4532162.1502780655!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4532162.1502780655!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police block a road near where a man rammed a car into a pizza restaurant near Paris. Picture: AFP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police block a road near where a man rammed a car into a pizza restaurant near Paris. Picture: AFP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4532162.1502780655!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/plans-to-create-musical-about-life-of-muhammad-ali-1-4531352","id":"1.4531352","articleHeadline": "Plans to create musical about life of Muhammad Ali","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502703922000 ,"articleLead": "

The life of boxing legend Muhammad Ali is to be given a musical makeover, it is reported.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531350.1502703887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Muhammad Ali stands over Sonny Liston on May 25, 1965, in Lewiston, Maine. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

Sporting great Ali died at 74 following an illustrious career in the ring during which he became a world heavyweight champion three times.

The Sun said producer David Sonenberg was looking to turn the life of Ali into a musical.

Sonenberg, who worked on Bat Out Of Hell, told the paper: “We can’t wait to be doing it. We have no clue who will play Muhammad but it’s going to be great.”

Ali was born Cassius Clay in January 14 1962, and converted to Islam in the mid-1960s, prompting the name change.

As a child, Cassius Clay was first persuaded into his local boxing gym by a policeman, Joe Martin, who found the eight-year-old distraught and bent on revenge against a boy who had stolen his bicycle.

That policeman’s decision would lead to the discovery of a fighter who transcended the sport.

He became a household name by winning gold at the 1960 Rome Olympics in the heavyweight division.

READ MORE - Thousands bid farewell to Muhammad Ali

He soon turned professional and, fighting under his original name, he made his debut in October 1960 with a sixth-round decision over Tunney Hunsaker in Louisville.

In 1964, after climbing off the canvas to beat Henry Cooper in London, Clay stunned the seemingly invincible Sonny Liston with a seventh-round win at Miami Beach to win the world heavyweight title.

During his career, he fought race wars, was stripped of his world title for refusing to fight in the US war in Vietnam and lost his boxing licence for close to four years as a consequence.

The first loss of his professional career - to Joe Frazier - was in the “The Fight of the Century”, although he earned perhaps his finest win with victory over then-champion Foreman in 1974.

Further significant fights followed, such as the “Thrilla in Manila”, when he stopped Frazier after 14 memorable rounds.

He eventually retired in 1981 with a record of 56 wins from 61 fights, and with a worldwide following.

Parkinson’s disease was diagnosed soon after, but he remained a public figure and famously lit the torch at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, the effects of his condition clear for the world to see.

In tributes following Ali’s death, then US president Barack Obama said the boxer “shook up the world and the world is better for it”.

He wrote: “Muhammad Ali was The Greatest. Period. If you just asked him, he’d tell you. He’d tell you he was the double greatest; that he’d ‘handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder into jail’.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531350.1502703887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531350.1502703887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Muhammad Ali stands over Sonny Liston on May 25, 1965, in Lewiston, Maine. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Muhammad Ali stands over Sonny Liston on May 25, 1965, in Lewiston, Maine. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531350.1502703887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531351.1502703890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531351.1502703890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Muhammad Ali pictured at the Robert Burns cottage in Alloway in 1965. Picture: TSPL","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Muhammad Ali pictured at the Robert Burns cottage in Alloway in 1965. Picture: TSPL","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531351.1502703890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/scots-teacher-dies-after-contracting-e-coli-in-turkey-1-4531222","id":"1.4531222","articleHeadline": "Scots teacher dies after contracting E. coli in Turkey","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502690761000 ,"articleLead": "

A teacher who was flown back to the UK after contracting E. coli in Turkey has died.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531221.1502690730!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Caroline Hope was flown back to the UK after contracting E.coli in Turkey. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

Caroline Hope arrived back in Glasgow last month following a crowdfunding appeal for a medical evacuation.

Her mother, Catherine Hope, confirmed she died yesterday at the city’s Queen Elizabeth University Hospital.

Ms Hope, who had been living in Turkey for four years, picked up the infection during surgery to treat advanced colon cancer in June.

The 37-year-old English teacher had decided to return home to Scotland after receiving her cancer diagnosis in January but complications from the surgery left her fighting for her life in Medical Park Hospital in Izmir, Turkey.

Desperate to bring her home, her family and friends raised more than £31,000 through a crowdfunding campaign to pay for a private medical evacuation, as there are strict rules around repatriations for medical reasons.

Mrs Hope, of Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, thanked everyone who contributed to the appeal and all the staff on the high dependency units at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital who cared for her daughter.

“I would just like to thank all the people who put money in towards bringing Caroline home,” she said.

“She was so grateful to be back in Scotland.”

Mrs Hope’s local MP, Martin Docherty, had written to Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to raise the case.

On her return to Scotland last month, Ms Hope said she wanted to thank everyone who had helped her get back to Scotland and added that knowing she was not alone and that her family were close was a “huge boost”.

Before she was flown out of Turkey, Ms Hope’s brother Scott said that her condition had deteriorated significantly.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "LYNSEY BEWS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531221.1502690730!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531221.1502690730!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Caroline Hope was flown back to the UK after contracting E.coli in Turkey. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Caroline Hope was flown back to the UK after contracting E.coli in Turkey. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531221.1502690730!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/deposed-pakistan-pm-sharif-calls-for-revolution-at-hometown-rally-1-4531054","id":"1.4531054","articleHeadline": "Deposed Pakistan PM Sharif calls for revolution at hometown rally","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502651635000 ,"articleLead": "

Deposed Pakistani prime minister Nawaz Sharif has called for “a change and revolution” in the country to ensure the sanctity of elections as he addressed tens of thousands of supporters in his home town.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531053.1502651603!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Deposed Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif waves to his supporters. Picture: AP Photo/Anjum Naveed"} ,"articleBody": "

Concluding his four-day journey, which began in Islamabad and culminated in Lahore, Mr Sharif was clearly delighted to address those who gathered near the famous Sufi shrine of Data Darbar.

After a supreme court decision disqualified him last month for concealing assets, Mr Sharif travelled with a long cavalcade from Islamabad, staying overnight in three cities.

Authorities stopped all vehicles, except those of Mr Sharif and ministers, at the entrance to the city because of the massive crowds.

He said that throughout his journey he had seen that 
people had not accepted his disqualification and asked supporters to await his next move, without elaborating.

Citing his accomplishments, he asked why a prime minister was disqualified when he was moving the country towards progress.

“Does a prime minister making the country developed and prosperous deserve such a treatment?” he said.

Mr Sharif pointed out that over the past 70 years no prime minister in Pakistan had been permitted to complete their term, making the country and its people suffer.

He said he was ready to give his life to change the destiny of the country and its people.

Mr Sharif has a rocky 
history with the country’s military establishment.

He served three separate stints as premier but never completed a full term in office.

In 1993, then-president 
Ghulam Ishaq Khan removed him on corruption allegations and, in 1999, General Pervez Musharraf seized power in a coup.

Meanwhile a suicide 
bomber killed eight soldiers and seven civilians when he 
targeted a military lorry near a private hospital in the 
south-western city of Quetta on Saturday.

Kabeer Khan, an explosives expert who examined the site, said the attacker was carrying about 25kgs of “incendiary explosives” on a motorcycle that he rammed into the lorry.

A military statement said the bomb wounded 25 people,
including 15 civilians. It said the explosives sparked fires in nearby vehicles and that all the victims were taken to a 
military hospital.

Pakistani army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa said the attack was an attempt to mar independence day festivities. He said: “Our resolve won’t succumb to any challenge.”

No group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531053.1502651603!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531053.1502651603!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Deposed Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif waves to his supporters. Picture: AP Photo/Anjum Naveed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Deposed Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif waves to his supporters. Picture: AP Photo/Anjum Naveed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531053.1502651603!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/donald-trump-under-fire-for-white-supremacist-violence-response-1-4531021","id":"1.4531021","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump under fire for white supremacist violence response","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502648487000 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump has come under fire for not explicitly denouncing white supremacists in the aftermath of violent clashes in Virginia, with the president being urged to take a public stand against groups that espouse racism and hate.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531020.1502648456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump speaks to the press about protests in Charlottesville. Picture: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

READ MORE - 1 dead, 19 hurt as car ploughs into anti-white-supremacist protesters

Mr Trump, while on a working holiday at his New Jersey golf club, addressed the nation on Saturday soon after a car ploughed into a group of anti-racist counter-protesters in Charlottesville, where neo-Nazis and white nationalists had assembled for a march.

The president did not single out any group, instead blaming “many sides” for the violence.

“Hate and the division must stop, and must stop right now,” he said. “We have to come together as Americans with love for our nation and... true affection for each other.”

He condemned “in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides”.

He added: “It’s been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump. Not Barack Obama. It’s been going on for a long, long time.”

On Sunday, the White House issued a statement seeking to expand on the president’s remarks. It said: “The president said very strongly in his statement yesterday that he condemns all forms of violence, bigotry and hatred and of course that includes white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazi and all extremist groups.

“He called for national unity and bringing all Americans together.”

During his address on Saturday, Mr Trump did not answer questions from reporters about whether he rejects the support of white nationalists or whether he believes the car crash was an example of domestic terrorism.

Aides who appeared on the Sunday news shows said the White House does believe those things, but many fellow Republicans have demanded Mr Trump personally denounces the white supremacists.

Senator Cory Gardner tweeted: “Mr. President - we must call evil by its name. These were white supremacists and this was domestic terrorism.”

Senator Marco Rubio added: “Nothing patriotic about #Nazis,the #KKK or #WhiteSupremacists. It’s the direct opposite of what #America seeks to be.”

Republican Chris Christie, a staunch Trump supporter, wrote: “We reject the racism and violence of white nationalists like the ones acting out in Charlottesville. Everyone in leadership must speak out.”

On the Democrat side, Senate minority leader Charles Schumer said: “Of course we condemn ALL that hate stands for. Until @POTUS specifically condemns alt-right action in Charlottesville, he hasn’t done his job.”

Democrat Governor Terry McAuliffe, who spoke to Mr Trump in the hours after the clashes, said he twice “said to him we have to stop this hateful speech, this rhetoric”, and he urged the president to “come out stronger” against the actions of white supremacists.

READ MORE - Murder charge after car hits anti-white-supremacist protesters

Mr Trump’s national security adviser HR McMaster said on Sunday that he considered the attack in Charlottesville to be terrorism:

“I certainly think anytime that you commit an attack against people to incite fear, it is terrorism,” he told ABC’s This Week.

“It meets the definition of terrorism. But what this is, what you see here, is you see someone who is a criminal, who is committing a criminal act against fellow Americans.”

The president’s homeland security adviser Tom Bossert defended the president’s statement by suggesting that some of the counter-protesters were violent too.

When pressed, he specifically condemned the racist groups.

The president’s daughter and White House aide Ivanka Trump tweeted on Sunday morning: “There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis.”

White nationalists had assembled in Charlottesville to vent their frustration against the city’s plans to take down a statue of Confederal general Robert E Lee.

Counter-protesters massed in opposition. A few hours after violent encounters between the two groups, a car drove into a crowd of people peacefully protesting against the rally, and the driver was later taken into custody.

Alt-right leader Richard Spencer and former Ku Klux Klan member David Duke attended the demonstrations, and Mr Duke told reporters the white nationalists were working to “fulfil the promises of Donald Trump”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Jonathan Lemire"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531020.1502648456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531020.1502648456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "US President Donald Trump speaks to the press about protests in Charlottesville. Picture: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump speaks to the press about protests in Charlottesville. Picture: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531020.1502648456!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/murder-charge-after-car-hits-anti-white-supremacist-protesters-1-4531019","id":"1.4531019","articleHeadline": "Murder charge after car hits anti-white-supremacist protesters","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502648123000 ,"articleLead": "

A man faces a murder charge after a car ploughed into a crowd of people protesting against a white supremacist rally in Virginia, killing a 32-year-old woman and injuring more than a dozen others, on a day full of violent confrontations.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531018.1502648398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "James Alex Fields Jr. was charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of protesters. Picture: Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP"} ,"articleBody": "

READ MORE - 1 dead, 19 hurt as car ploughs into anti-white-supremacist protesters

Shortly after, a Virginia State Police helicopter above the rally crashed outside Charlottesville, killing the pilot and a trooper.

The chaos boiled over at what is believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade, protesting against plans to remove a statue of Confederate general Robert E Lee.

That gathering sparked a counter-demonstration by others protesting against racism.

Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe declared an emergency and police in riot gear moved people away.

Matt Korbon, 22, a University of Virginia student, said several hundred counter-protesters were marching when “suddenly there was just this tyre screeching sound”.

A silver Dodge Challenger smashed into another car, then reversed, barrelling through “a sea of people”.

The impact hurled people into the air and those left standing scattered, screaming and running for safety.

The driver was later identified by police as James Fields, 20, of Ohio.

He has been charged with second-degree murder, three counts of malicious wounding, and one count related to leaving the scene. A bail hearing will take place on Monday.

Fields was photographed on the morning of the incident holding a shield with the emblem of a white supremacist group.

Vanguard America denies that Fields is a member and says it handed out shields to anyone in attendance who wanted them.

The Anti-Defamation League says Vanguard America believes the US is an exclusively white nation and uses propaganda to recruit young white men online and on college campuses.

Vanguard America confirmed via Twitter that members were in Charlottesville on Saturday morning to rally against plans to remove a Confederate statue.

In the photo by the New York Daily News, Fields stands with a handful of men, all dressed similarly in the usual Vanguard America uniform of khakis and white polo shirts.

The men hold white shields with a black-and-white logo of two axes. The Confederate statue of Robert E Lee is in the background. The paper says the photo was taken at about 10.30am and Charlottesville officials say the car crashed into the crowd, killing one, at 1.42pm.

US president Donald Trump condemned “in the strongest possible terms” what he called an “egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides” after the clashes and called for “a swift restoration of law and order and the protection of innocent lives”.

He said he and Mr McAuliffe “agreed that the hate and the division must stop and must stop right now”.

Field’s mother, Samantha Bloom, said she knew her son was attending a rally in Virginia but did not know it was a white supremacist event.

“I thought it had something to do with Trump. Trump’s not a white supremacist,” she said.

“He had an African-American friend so ...,” she said before her voice trailed off. She added that she would be surprised if her son’s views were that far right.

Ms Bloom, who became visibly upset as she learned of the injuries and deaths at the rally, said she and her son had just moved to the Toledo area from the northern Kentucky city of Florence, where Fields grew up.

The Department of Justice has opened a federal civil rights investigation into the deadly car attack.

Attorney general Jeff Sessions said that the FBI’s Richmond field office and Rick Mountcastle, the US Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, would lead the investigation.

“The violence and deaths in Charlottesville strike at the heart of American law and justice,” Mr Sessions said.

“When such actions arise from racial bigotry and hatred, they betray our core values and cannot be tolerated.”

The turbulence began on Friday night, when the white nationalists carried torches though the University of Virginia campus.

It quickly spiralled into violence on Saturday. Hundreds of people threw punches, hurled water bottles and unleashed chemical sprays.

Authorities said the car collision left 19 people injured and a total of 35 patients were treated.

State police said the helicopter was “assisting public safety resources with the ongoing situation” when it crashed in a wooded area.

The pilot, Lieutenant Jay Cullen, 48, of Midlothian, Virginia, and Trooper-Pilot Berke Bates of Quinton, Virginia, died at the scene.

Some of the white nationalists cited Mr Trump’s election victory as validation for their beliefs and Trump critics pointed to the president’s rhetoric as exploiting America’s festering racial tension.

Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler had called for what he termed a “pro-white” rally in Charlottesville, sparked by the monument decision and both white nationalists and their opponents promoted the event for weeks.

But many were just locals caught in the fray.

Teacher Colleen Cook, 26, who stood on a kerb shouting at demonstrators to go home, said she sent her son, who is black, out of town for the weekend.

“This isn’t how he should have to grow up,” she said.

Cliff Erickson said he thought removing the statue amounted to erasing history and the “counter-protesters are crazier than the alt-right”.

“Both sides are hoping for a confrontation,” he said.

It is the latest hostility in Charlottesville since the city, about 100 miles from Washington DC, voted earlier this year to remove a statue of Lee.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Sarah Rankin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531018.1502648398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531018.1502648398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "James Alex Fields Jr. was charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of protesters. Picture: Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "James Alex Fields Jr. was charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of protesters. Picture: Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531018.1502648398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/edinburgh-researchers-discover-91-volcanoes-in-antarctica-1-4531011","id":"1.4531011","articleHeadline": "Edinburgh researchers discover 91 volcanoes in Antarctica","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502647359000 ,"articleLead": "

Scientists believe they have found the largest volcanic region on earth - under the ice of Antarctica.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531010.1502650965!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Picture: Mario Tama/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

A remote survey discovered 91 volcanoes ranging in height from 100m to 3,850m in a massive region known as the West Antarctic Rift System.

Geologists and ice experts say the range has similarities to east Africa’s volcanic ridge, currently acknowledged to be the densest concentration of volcanoes in the world.

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh remotely surveyed the underside of the ice sheet for hidden peaks of basalt rock, like those of other volcanoes in the region whose tips push above the ice.

They analysed the shape of the land beneath using measurements from ice-penetrating radar, and compared the findings with satellite and database records, as well as geological information from aerial surveys.

The study, which is the first of its kind, was proposed by Max Van Wyk de Vries, a third-year student at the University of Edinburgh.

Scientists hope it will help them understand how volcanoes can influence long-term fluctuations in the ice sheet and how the continent has changed in past climates.

Mr Van Wyk de Vries, said: “Antarctica remains among the least studied areas of the globe, and as a young scientist I was excited to learn about something new and not well understood.

“After examining existing data on West Antarctica, I began discovering traces of volcanism. Naturally I looked into it further, which led to this discovery of almost 100 volcanoes under the ice sheet.”

The results do not indicate whether the volcanoes are active, but should inform ongoing research into seismic monitoring in the area.

Previous studies have suggested that volcanic activity may have occurred in the region during warmer periods and could increase if Antarctica’s ice thins in a warming climate.

Dr Robert Bingham, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences, said: “It is fascinating to uncover an extensive range of volcanoes in this relatively unexplored continent.

“Better understanding of volcanic activity could shed light on their impact on Antarctica’s ice in the past, present and future, and on other rift systems around the world.”

The study has been published in the Geological Society Special Publications series.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Paul Ward"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4531010.1502650965!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4531010.1502650965!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Picture: Mario Tama/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Picture: Mario Tama/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4531010.1502650965!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/new-zealand-man-embarks-on-quest-to-find-loch-ness-monster-1-4530818","id":"1.4530818","articleHeadline": "New Zealand man embarks on quest to find Loch Ness Monster","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502632976000 ,"articleLead": "

A New Zealand professor has travelled to Scotland in a bid to locate the Loch Ness Monster.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530816.1502632945!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "One of the most famous pictures of 'Nessie'. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

Geneticist Neil Gemmell, from the University of Otago, on South Island, is hoping to trawl the vast loch for DNA - from the likes of excrement, urine, dandruff or other types of skin cells, in a bid to discover if a creature lurks in the body of water.

Professor Gemmell told Newshub: “You don’t believe in Nessie as such, but there is a little bit of you - my inner child - hoping that you might evidence.

READ MORE - Most convincing photo of the Loch Ness Monster ever taken?

“We’re always excited about the prospect of discovering something new - I suspect there are new things to be found.”

Most of Professor Gemmell’s research, according to his page on the University of Otago website, centres on ecology, population, conservation and evolutionary biology.

In April, concerns were raised after eight months passed with no sightings of Nessie.

READ MORE - Dog-walker snaps picture of Loch Ness Monster on land

Gary Campbell, keeper of the Official Loch Ness Monster Sightings Register, admitted that he was ‘worried’ by the lack of sightings, adding: “2016 was a record year with eight sightings but then she seems to have disappeared.”

Last year was the best year for sightings of the famously elusive beast since 2000.

Mr Campbell told The Scotsman: “We’re quite worried that there has been an eight-month gap since the last sighting. This is especially so when you consider that pretty much everyone will have access to a camera phone to take video and pictures – we would have expected at least something in that time period.

READ MORE - Loch Ness Monster posted ‘missing’ after no sightings in eight months

“When it comes to the reported sightings of Nessie, we reckon about half of those sent to us don’t make it on to the register – what’s really strange is that there has been nothing reported at all – not even sightings of things that we can discount.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530816.1502632945!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530816.1502632945!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "One of the most famous pictures of 'Nessie'. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "One of the most famous pictures of 'Nessie'. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530816.1502632945!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530817.1502632946!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530817.1502632946!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Professor Neil Gemmell. Picture: Twitter","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Professor Neil Gemmell. Picture: Twitter","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530817.1502632946!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/body-found-in-western-isles-search-for-missing-german-man-1-4530793","id":"1.4530793","articleHeadline": "Body found in Western Isles search for missing German man","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502629921000 ,"articleLead": "

Police searching for a missing German man in the Western Isles have reported that a body has been found.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530792.1502629890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Torsten Kulke, 48, was reported missing on 31 July. Picture: Police Scotland"} ,"articleBody": "

Torsten Kulke, 48, was reported missing from his home in Germany on July 31 but it was later discovered that he travelled to the Isle of Lewis on July 28.

Working with German colleagues, Police Scotland issued an appeal and some of his belongings were found in the Aird Uig area last week.

On Saturday, the body of a man was recovered from Cliff Beach, near Valtos.

Police said formal identification is still to take place but Mr Kulke’s family have been informed.

There are not thought to be any suspicious circumstances and a report is to be sent to the Procurator Fiscal.

A Police Scotland spokesman said: “A member of the public informed police at around 3:25pm of the discovery of the man’s body. Officers attended and were assisted by the Coastguard.

“Formal identification is yet to take place. However, the family of missing Torsten Kulke have been informed.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530792.1502629890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530792.1502629890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Torsten Kulke, 48, was reported missing on 31 July. Picture: Police Scotland","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Torsten Kulke, 48, was reported missing on 31 July. Picture: Police Scotland","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530792.1502629890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/message-in-a-bottle-found-on-barra-after-4-000-mile-journey-1-4530688","id":"1.4530688","articleHeadline": "Message in a bottle found on Barra after 4,000-mile journey","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502620880000 ,"articleLead": "

A message in a bottle has washed up on a Scottish beach more than 4,000 miles away from its origin.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530687.1502620850!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Map showing the route the bottle took, from the Dominican Republic to the west coast of Barra. Picture: Google Maps"} ,"articleBody": "

The bottle, thrown into the sea in the summer of 2015, was written by a four-year-old German boy on holiday in the Dominican Republic.

The boy, known only as Luke, asked whoever found the bottle to reply to him as soon as possible.

READ MORE - 50-year-old message in a bottle traced to Edinburgh sailor

Kenny MacKinnon, a firefighter based at Barra Airport, found the bottle on the island’s west coast.

He told the Press and Journal newspaper: “I had just finished cutting the greens on the Barra Golf Course, and since it was a nice night I went down to the shoreline for a walk.

READ MORE - Message in a bottle travels from Findochty to Russia

“I saw a bottle bouncing on the water, and because it’s a pebble beach, I went and got it before it smashed. It had growths on it, like barnacles, so I guessed it had been in the sea for a long time.”

Mr MacKinnon revealed how he could see there was a message inside, so he took the bottle home and removed the cork to get it out.

He continued: “It was a letter from a boy from Germany who was on holiday in the Dominican Republic, and he had sent the message from there in the summer of 2015.”

The message read: “Hello. My name is Luke. I’m on holidays with my brother Earle and my father Felix and my mother Kerstin.

READ MORE - Iceland message in a bottle washes up on Tiree after a year

“We are staying 3 weeks in the Dominican Republic. I’ll become 5 years on the 11th of November. I’m going on to write this letter in hope to receive an answer as soon as possible.”

Mr MacKinnon confirmed that he had replied to the boy, telling him how far the bottle had travelled, as well as including photos of the bottle and its final destination.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530687.1502620850!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530687.1502620850!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Map showing the route the bottle took, from the Dominican Republic to the west coast of Barra. Picture: Google Maps","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Map showing the route the bottle took, from the Dominican Republic to the west coast of Barra. Picture: Google Maps","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530687.1502620850!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/world/1-dead-19-hurt-as-car-ploughs-into-anti-white-supremacist-protesters-1-4530530","id":"1.4530530","articleHeadline": "1 dead, 19 hurt as car ploughs into anti-white-supremacist protesters","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1502615420000 ,"articleLead": "

ONE person has died and 19 others have been injured after a car ploughed into a group of anti-white-nationalist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530653.1502615380!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman receives first-aid after a car ploughed into a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville. Picture: AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Witnesses said a car ploughed into a crowd of people who were protesting against a rally held by white nationalists who oppose the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E Lee by civic officials in Charlottesville.

The city had been the scene of violent clashes between the nationalists and counter-protesters earlier.

Speaking in New Jersey, US president Donald Trump condemned “this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides”.

He added: “What is vital now is a swift restoration of law and order and the protection of innocent lives.”

The incident happened about two hours after violent clashes broke out between white nationalists – who descended on the town to rally against the city’s plans to remove the historic statue and others who arrived to protest against the racism.

Hundreds of people chanted, threw punches, hurled water bottles and unleashed chemical sprays during the ensuing violence.

Virginia’s governor Terry McAuliffe had declared a state of emergency in response to the rally. The demonstrations began on Friday in Charlottesville with white nationalists marching through town and carrying lit torches. The demonstrators then clashed with counter-protesters.

After the violence the organiser of the white nationalist rally encouraged attendees to leave town after authorities declared an unlawful assembly and police ordered people to disperse.

• READ MORE: Charlottesville - Trump condemns hatred and bigotry ‘on many sides’

Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler organised the demo in protest over the statue decision.

Kessler had called for what he termed a “pro-white” rally in protest at Charlottesville’s decision to remove the Confederate statue from a city park.

Kessler said earlier that the rally was partly about the removal of Confederate symbols but also about free speech and “advocating for white people.”

“This is about an anti-white climate within the Western world and the need for white people to have advocacy like other groups do,” he said.

Charlottesville, nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, is a liberal-leaning city that’s home to the flagship University of Virginia and Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson.

The statue’s removal is part of a broader city effort to change the way Charlottesville’s history of race is told in public spaces. The city has also renamed Lee Park, where the statue stands, and Jackson Park, named for Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. They are now called Emancipation Park and Justice Park, respectively.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "SARAH RANKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530653.1502615380!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530653.1502615380!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A woman receives first-aid after a car ploughed into a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman receives first-aid after a car ploughed into a crowd of counter-protesters in Charlottesville. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530653.1502615380!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530654.1502615383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530654.1502615383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A counter demonstrator uses a lighted spray can against a white nationalist demonstrator. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A counter demonstrator uses a lighted spray can against a white nationalist demonstrator. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530654.1502615383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530655.1502615386!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530655.1502615386!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The car that allegedly ploughed through a crowd of protestors is seen after it was stopped by police several blocks away. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The car that allegedly ploughed through a crowd of protestors is seen after it was stopped by police several blocks away. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530655.1502615386!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4530656.1502615390!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4530656.1502615390!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters in Charlottesville. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters in Charlottesville. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4530656.1502615390!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}