{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"uk","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/financial/bill-jamieson-who-is-the-victim-in-barclays-court-action-1-4486420","id":"1.4486420","articleHeadline": "Bill Jamieson: Who is the victim in Barclays court action?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498459153000 ,"articleLead": "

When former Barclays boss John Varley and three other former directors face criminal charges at Westminster magistrates court a week today, they will be the first British bankers to face criminal charges for actions taken during the financial crisis.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486419.1498459151!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Bill Jamieson wonders where the injured party is in Barclays' Qatari case. Picture: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

They have been charged with fraud and unlawful financial assistance over its dealings with Qatari investors, including the former prime minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim in 2008 when Britain’s banking system was on the verge of collapse. But a crucial party to the proceedings will be absent. Who is the victim?

• READ MORE: Financial news

Barclays turned to the Qataris as well as other private investors for two huge cash calls in June and October 2008 that raised £11.8 billion to avoid a government bail-out.

Varley and his co-directors were desperate to avoid having to go to the UK Treasury for a state rescue. They feared it would come with conditions including forced sales of assets, abandonment of global growth plans, government supervision of day-to-day management and loss of bonuses. All this was unfolding at the peak of the global banking crisis where panic was setting in.

In this febrile atmosphere it was highly doubtful that Barclays would be able to raise sufficient funds by way of a right issue to meet the regulator’s capital ratio requirement – 8 per cent or £13bn – if a state bail-out was to be avoided. So the bank turned to Gulf investors – and help duly came.

But the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has brought charges after an extensive five-year investigation into the side deals the bank struck with the Qataris alongside the fundraisings. Its charges focus on so-called “advisory services agreements” for payments totalling £322 million made by Barclays to the Qataris, as well as a $3bn loan from the bank to the Gulf state.

• READ MORE: Barclays and four former directors face fraud charges

As well as charging the bank on all counts, the SFO has charged Varley; Roger Jenkins, its former star banker who led its Middle Eastern business; Thomas Kalaris, who led its wealth division; and Richard Boath, the ex-head of its financial institutions group, with conspiracy to commit fraud in the June fundraising.

Varley and Jenkins also face the same charge over the October cash call as well as the unlawful financial assistance charge related to the $3bn loan. This could have broken the law if the SFO can show it was connected with the Qatari payments to Barclays. Public companies are normally prohibited in the UK from lending money for the purchase of their own shares, a process known as financial assistance.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

The fraud charges each carry maximum prison sentences of ten years, while the unlawful financial assistance charge carries a possible two-year term. The bank could be fined. Jenkins’s lawyer said he “intends to vigorously defend against these charges”. The trial will be held in the full glare of publicity and could run for years. But there is a key witness absent in all of this: the victim. Legal proceedings are driven by the requirement to ensure restoration to the injured party. But who exactly is the injured party here?

Not the state of Qatar. The loans have been repaid in full, it made a significant profit on its investment, it retains a 6 per cent stake in Barclays and it continues to be a big investor in the UK. Not the government. It was spared a serious escalation of the crisis – and its debt obligations – that a rescue of Barclays would have entailed. As for the financial sector, almost no institution would have escaped the repercussions of such a blow to investor and depositor confidence.

Not the taxpayer, spared the burden of financing yet another bank rescue and the constraints on public spending that would have followed. Not Barclays customers. The bank has not suffered a loss of customer confidence as a result of this deal and continues to present a competitive offer.

And not Barclays investors. While the shares suffered along with others in the crisis and the Qatari deal was ferociously costly – the instruments to which the Qataris subscribed carried an eye-watering coupon of 14 per cent – it is by no means certain that a government rescue would have spared shareholders a colossal dilution.

So who is the victim? To whom should restitution be made? None of this, of course, lifts the dark cloud that hangs over Barclays in other matters. Its chief executive Jes Staley faces a regulatory probe into his conduct against a whistle-blower. The bank has also failed to reach a settlement with US authorities over allegations it mis-sold toxic mortgage-backed securities.

It is also contesting a $1bn civil lawsuit from businesswoman Amanda Staveley, who arranged an investment in Barclays from Abu Dhabi investors during the crisis.

But in the Qatari case, where is the injured party?

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" ,"byline": {"email": "businessdesk@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Bill Jamieson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486419.1498459151!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486419.1498459151!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Bill Jamieson wonders where the injured party is in Barclays' Qatari case. Picture: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Bill Jamieson wonders where the injured party is in Barclays' Qatari case. Picture: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486419.1498459151!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/how-do-we-give-the-nhs-a-healthy-balance-sheet-1-4483283","id":"1.4483283","articleHeadline": "How do we give the NHS a healthy balance sheet?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498142160000 ,"articleLead": "

It is so easy to take our National Health ­Service for granted. My daughter who lives in Brussels recently ­suffered a broken hip and was full of praise for the quick, responsive medical care she received in a Belgian hospital.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4483282.1498142163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Aneurin Bevan talks to the NHS's first patient Sylvia Diggory, 13, at Trafford General Hospital in 1948. Picture: Trafford Healthcare NHS Trust/PA"} ,"articleBody": "

However, when she was being discharged, she was struck by the sight of a queue of people standing in line to pay for their treatment and a credit card machine on the desk of the hospital reception which seemed very out of sorts.

In narrating this story to friends, another ex-pat ­living in Brussels shared his ­experience. Having moved to Brussels, and being used to the UK system, he had not put in place the arrangements to deal with his healthcare. ­Taking the care for ­granted, he was surprised to find ­bailiffs at his door in respect of unpaid health bills following treatment.

There is much talk about the fact that we are living longer with multiple conditions like diabetes and heart disease requiring ­treatments that are rising in cost.

Meanwhile, it is reported that hospital bed numbers have fallen and frequent headlines claiming our NHS is in crisis.

It appears to me that we have a choice to make and the sooner we make it the better.

The general public would like to prioritise our healthcare system but is not keen to pay more for it. The disconnect appears to be in evidencing “value for money”.

What price are we prepared to pay for our health care? Do we really prioritise its ­importance if it’s a service we dip in and out of until age forces us to take issue? Are we even aware, or prepared to join in the debate, the costs of our general healthcare whether that be medicines, operations, nursing care, dental treatment, meals? The costs are significant and ­continually on the rise.

There are many systems available throughout the world that appear to be ­performing better than ours. In those countries there is some connection between the money being paid and the delivery of the service.

In Germany and France, for example, they use a social insurance model to pay for healthcare but deductions are taken from income so it does not operate differently from tax deducted at source.

Unlike other insurance ­models, everyone is ­covered and the companies who ­operate the healthcare cover do not make a profit. This seems like a ‘fairer’ option and one worthy of consideration.

In Belgium they are ­considering charging vat on cosmetic surgery, but ­excluding reconstructive ­surgery required by ­accidents.

Long gone are the days when our National ­Insurance contributions directly ­funded our healthcare and its structure has dramatically changed since its ­inception by Aneurin Bevan in 1948, when his ambitious vision introduced healthcare for all citizens transforming post-war society and ­building a health service admired around the world.

It may be time to revisit that or at least take a more ­radical and bold approach, ­similar to Bevan’s to a long term ­problem.

Peter Duff is managing ­partner at Morisons Solicitors.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4483282.1498142163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4483282.1498142163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Aneurin Bevan talks to the NHS's first patient Sylvia Diggory, 13, at Trafford General Hospital in 1948. Picture: Trafford Healthcare NHS Trust/PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Aneurin Bevan talks to the NHS's first patient Sylvia Diggory, 13, at Trafford General Hospital in 1948. Picture: Trafford Healthcare NHS Trust/PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4483282.1498142163!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/1-arrest-6-hurt-after-car-strikes-pedestrians-at-eid-event-1-4485899","id":"1.4485899","articleHeadline": "1 arrest, 6 hurt after car strikes pedestrians at Eid event","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498387088000 ,"articleLead": "

Six people are being treated in hospital after a woman crashed her car into a crowd following Eid celebrations with her family in Newcastle.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485898.1498387087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Northumbria Police have said they do not believe the incident was terror-related. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

The 42-year-old woman was arrested after the collision, which happened at around 9.14am outside Westgate Sports Centre, in the city, where a large number of people were attending prayers for the religious festival.

Northumbria Police said they had no reason to believe the incident was terror-related.

The six casualties, including three children, were taken to the Royal Victoria Infirmary.

Two of the children are in paediatric intensive care and one adult is in the trauma high dependency unit.

The remaining three are believed to have serious but not life-threatening injuries, police said.

Assistant Chief Constable Darren Best said: “At approximately 9.14am we received reports that a car had collided with pedestrians outside of Westgate Sports Centre, in Newcastle city centre.

“At that time a large number of people were in the area celebrating the religious festival Eid that is held to mark the end of Ramadan.

“What we have established is that a 42-year-old female has been celebrating Eid with her family, she then got into her car and has collided with six people in the crowd.

“We have no information to suggest this is terror-related, however, this is a serious collision with multiple casualties and extensive inquiries are ongoing to establish the circumstances around this tragic incident.”

Mr Best said extra officers are on patrol around communities in the area to answer any questions or concerns.

Specially trained family liaison officers are working with the affected families.

Earlier, a North East Ambulance Service spokesman said: “We received our first 999 call at 9.15 this morning to report a car that had mounted the kerb.

“We have taken six people to hospital, they have gone to the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle, three children and three adults.”

Emergency services sent to the scene included six ambulances, two paramedic rapid response vehicles, the air ambulance, three ambulance officers, four hazardous area response team vehicles and two paramedic trauma cars.

The ambulance service spokesman said the first ambulance arrived on the scene within two minutes of the first 999 call.

A statement from the nearby Newcastle Central Mosque said the collision happened immediately after people were leaving the area following Eid prayers.

It said: “Immediately after the Eid prayers, when the people were starting to leave the venue, a car collided with pedestrians.

“The injured were immediately attended to by the emergency medical services and the police. All the injured have been taken to the hospital.

“We pray and hope that all those affected recover soon fully.

“We thank the emergency medical services, the police and over 100 volunteers from the mosque for their quick response to the incident.

“We were able to clear the area promptly ensuring there was no delay in the injured being attended to.

“We urge everyone to please pray for all those affected.

“The police are investigating the incident at the moment and we will give an update as soon as we have more information.”

Chi Onwurah, Labour MP for Newcastle Central, tweeted about the incident after attending the prayers.

The MP said: “So sad, I was at the prayers earlier and there were so much joy and unity. Thinking of those affected by what I am told was terrible accident.”

Any witnesses, or anyone with any information, are asked to contact Northumbria Police on 101 quoting reference number 277 25/06/17.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485898.1498387087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485898.1498387087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Northumbria Police have said they do not believe the incident was terror-related. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Northumbria Police have said they do not believe the incident was terror-related. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485898.1498387087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/calls-for-broadcasters-to-be-patriotic-over-brexit-branded-sinister-1-4485760","id":"1.4485760","articleHeadline": "Calls for broadcasters to be patriotic over Brexit branded ‘sinister’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498366844000 ,"articleLead": "

Calls by a Cabinet minister for broadcasters to be “patriotic” over Brexit have been branded “sinister” by Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485759.1498337143!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The comments by Andrea Leadsom were branded sinister by Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron. Picture: Lisa Ferguson"} ,"articleBody": "

Commons leader Andrea Leadsom made the remarks on BBC Newsnight. She said: “It would be helpful if broadcasters were willing to be a bit patriotic.

“The country took a decision, this government is determined to deliver on that decision.”

Newsnight anchor Emily Maitlis hit back at the minister by asking her if she was being accused of being unpatriotic because she questioned whether Prime Minister Theresa May was in a position of strength in dealing with EU counterparts.

Maitlis said: “Are you accusing me of being unpatriotic for questioning how negotiations are going, questioning whether you have the position of strength that she said she wanted?”

The minister replied: “I’m not accusing you of anything, Emily. I’m simply saying we all need to pull together as a country. We took a decision a year ago today to leave the European Union, we have a very strong hand and we are very well prepared for the negotiations.”

Farron branded the comments “stupid” and called for an apology. He said: “This is a sinister threat to the free media.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TOM PETERKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485759.1498337143!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485759.1498337143!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The comments by Andrea Leadsom were branded sinister by Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron. Picture: Lisa Ferguson","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The comments by Andrea Leadsom were branded sinister by Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron. Picture: Lisa Ferguson","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485759.1498337143!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/angry-tenants-defy-evacuation-order-as-34-blocks-fail-fire-tests-1-4485776","id":"1.4485776","articleHeadline": "Angry tenants defy evacuation order as 34 blocks fail fire tests","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498338784000 ,"articleLead": "

A total of 34 high-rise buildings in 17 local authorities across England have failed fire cladding safety tests in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster, the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has announced.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485774.1498338780!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman with suitcases leaves Taplow Tower residential block on the Chalcots Estate in north London. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The revelation comes as more than 3,000 residents of the Chalcots Estate in Camden, north London, are facing weeks in temporary accommodation after four tower blocks were evacuated.

London boroughs Brent, Barnet, Hounslow and Camden, along with Manchester, Plymouth and Portsmouth were named by the government yesterday as having buildings that had failed tests amid a nationwide safety operation launched after at least 79 people died when fire ripped through Grenfell Tower in north Kensington on 14 June.

Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said around 600 council flats have been evacuated due to concerns over “combustible” external cladding, insulation, gas pipes and fire doors.

But 83 households had refused to leave by yesterday morning.

Roger Evans, 51, who said he found out that his building was being cleared after a friend saw it on the news and alerted him by text, said: “As far as I am concerned, nothing in that building has changed in the last few days, weeks, months or years.

“It was perfectly safe before, despite what they are saying now – I believe I am safe in there.”

Iola McCarogher, 27, said: “I am not leaving, it is my home. Until someone comes and puts a court order in front of my face, I am not leaving.

“I have a disabled mother, I have animals in my property – they are not doing anything and no-one is telling us anything – it is ridiculous.”

Gould said it would “become a matter for the fire service” if residents stayed in their homes after being spoken to again by officials.

Gould said it could take between two and four weeks to make safe the four buildings – Taplow, Burnham, Bray and Dorney – while residents of a fifth tower block, Blashford, were told they could return to their homes.

Work had been due to begin on stripping cladding from buildings on the Chalcots Estate, but Camden Council ordered the “decant” of residents on Friday evening following further checks by the London Fire Brigade.

People were told to leave as darkness began to fall, with some taking belongings in suitcases and carrier bags, and some locals saying they only learned of the evacuation as they watched the news.

Families with newborn babies and a Second World War veteran were among those ordered out of their homes after fire officers said they could not guarantee the safety of the buildings, with more than 100 staying in the Swiss Cottage Leisure Centre overnight and others sleeping in hotels.

Waiting for a minibus to take her family to a hotel six miles away, Zega Ghebre, 42, said the situation was “unbelievable”.

She added: “The thing that makes me angry is that we watched the news, we tried to evacuate and they sent us back, they said they were only taking Taplow. We asked again and again and they gave us all different reasons. We were told ‘There’s nothing to worry about, you’re not going to evacuate’. It’s hard to trust anyone now, because if they come and tell me something, we won’t know.”

Gould said the council is looking at accommodation including student halls and opening up newly built social housing, with hopes that by tomorrow 50 per cent of tenants will be accommodated. She said the cost to the council will be “really expensive” taking into account the work on the blocks, and the temporary accommodation, but the council was not thinking about the “purse strings”.

Refurbishment of the Chalcots Estate was overseen by Rydon, the company involved in the refit of Grenfell Tower, according to the Rydon website.

The site said the Chalcots project was a £66 million refurbishment which lasted 191 weeks. It included external thermal rain screen cladding on five towers, new aluminium thermally broken windows on five towers and an overhaul of external roofs.

It added that 711 flats were modernised with new wiring, heating, kitchens and bathrooms.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "KEVAN CHRISTIE"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485774.1498338780!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485774.1498338780!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A woman with suitcases leaves Taplow Tower residential block on the Chalcots Estate in north London. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman with suitcases leaves Taplow Tower residential block on the Chalcots Estate in north London. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485774.1498338780!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485775.1498338784!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485775.1498338784!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A resident with belongings leaves Burnham Tower residential block on the Chalcots Estate in north London. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A resident with belongings leaves Burnham Tower residential block on the Chalcots Estate in north London. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485775.1498338784!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/confessions-of-a-convicted-child-porn-sex-offender-1-4485677","id":"1.4485677","articleHeadline": "Confessions of a convicted child porn sex offender","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498366800000 ,"articleLead": "

The moment Tom spotted three police officers standing outside his home, he knew his life was effectively over. For many months, the middle-aged man from West Lothian had been a prolific viewer of indecent images of underage girls, accessing them through a file-sharing site. Though he had stopped some time previously, he had nevertheless left a trail of evidence on old computers and memory sticks the police seized.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485675.1498334233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Tom admits that he had looked at adult pornography for most of his life. Photograph: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

“I had the sickest feeling,” he says. “I realised my life was going to change horribly and irrevocably, and so it turned out.” Tom’s actions cost him his marriage. His wife – the mother of his grown-up children – threw him out, leaving him shell-shocked. But by working with the charity Stop It Now! Scotland, part of the Lucy Faithfull Foundation, he also came to understand the impact his offending had on the teenage girls whose sexual acting-out he viewed so compulsively. “When I was at my computer, I was disconnected. The images just spooled along and I looked,” he says. “Group therapy helped me feel empathy. I understood that every image I looked at involved a victim. If I hadn’t been looking at those images – if nobody looked at them – they wouldn’t be posted and very possibly the abuse wouldn’t take place. It’s men like me who create the demand.”

Tom is speaking to me at the Edinburgh office of Stop It Now! Scotland, as it prepares to launch a two-month deterrence campaign in conjunction with Police Scotland and five local authorities: the City of Edinburgh Council, West Lothian Council, East Lothian Council, Midlothian Council and Scottish Borders Council.

The charity provides confidential and anonymous support to people who are having sexual thoughts about children and young people. It also runs Inform Plus educational courses for offenders who have already been charged and are waiting to appear in court.

The campaign, which starts tomorrow, involves Facebook posts, posters and radio adverts, all with the same message: that those downloading sexual images of children will be caught and punished, but also that there is help available for those who want to stop.

Tom, who is self-employed, agreed to be interviewed because he too wants to encourage offenders to think about the consequences of their actions. Though much of what he says is unpalatable, he is able to give some insight into what drove his behaviour.

He says he had looked at pornography most of his life, but that his usage increased after his children were born and his wife no longer wanted to have sex. With no knowledge of how to navigate the dark web, he viewed only legal images of over-18s until one day he stumbled on a file-sharing site which dealt in illegal porn, including images of children. Though Tom insists he has never had any attraction to children, nor any interest in contact offending, he “jumped right in”. “There were lots of reasons I did it,” he says. “Morbid curiosity, perverted voyeurism, the thrill of doing something illegal. People are voyeurs. If there’s a prang on the motorway, they will slow down to look. It is human nature.”

Though Tom was sent an avalanche of files, he claims the images he found arousing involved girls in their mid-teens dancing round in their bedrooms in their underwear and masturbating in front of the camera. Stop It Now! Scotland says those images may have been filmed and put on the internet by the girls’ boyfriends or the girls may have been groomed to “perform” by men who manipulated them online.

But Tom didn’t give any thought to the victims. “I knew it was wrong, but when you view these images, you are remote. If someone had said to me: ‘Look out, you are downloading images of child abuse’, maybe I would have got a fright and stopped, but it doesn’t occur to you.”

Tom convinced himself his use of encryption would protect his identity, but reckons a police informer infiltrated the site. On the day of his arrest, he was taken to a police station, interviewed under caution and charged. He was kept in custody overnight for his own protection as the suicide rate amongst those lifted for downloading sexual images of children is high. “I like to think of myself as robust but I understand why people go there – I really do,” he says.

After appearing in court and being remanded on bail, he went home to face his family. He managed to salvage his relationship with his children, but his wife soon decided the marriage was over, and within 10 days he was living in a friend’s house.

“My wife has a great many talents and we had a successful marriage for many years. I loved her and thought of her as my partner for life,” he says. “She is still in a very bad state – that’s one of my greatest regrets.”

After his court appearance, Tom found a link to Stop It Now! and got in touch. He was enrolled on one of the charity’s Inform Plus courses, which involved 10 two-hour sessions with eight other men.

The sessions are designed to make the men think about the impact of their behaviour both on their own lives and the lives of the children whose images they have viewed. So, one week they have to write about their own ordeal, another they write an essay from the perspective of a victim. “The essay written from the perspective of the victim is a hell of a lesson. You suddenly make a connection and your whole way of thinking changes,” he says.

In April, Tom pleaded guilty at a sheriff court and was put on a six-month supervision order, which requires him to report in to a criminal justice social worker once a week; he was also put on the sex offenders register.

He insists he has not looked at a single pornographic image – legal or illegal – since his arrest. “I cannot say I will never look at legal porn again, although it’s been a year and I don’t think I will, but I know for sure I will never look at indecent images of children,” he says. “Seeing those officers coming down my drive was 100 per cent therapeutic.”

Supporting sex offenders is controversial. But, as Police Scotland chief constable Philip Gormley has pointed out, so many men are now downloading indecent images of children, we would need to build prisons on an industrial scale to jail them all.

Stop It Now! Scotland says 1,600 people sought help to stop looking at sexual images of children online in 2016, either through its helpline or the self-help section of its website.

National manager Stuart Allardyce said: “We have worked with hundreds of men arrested for viewing sexual images of children. Many knew what they were doing was wrong, but struggled to change their behaviour. That’s where our work comes in.

“We make sure these men understand the harm they have caused the children in these images, and also the consequences for them and their families if they don’t get to grips with their behaviour. Once they understand this, they become far less likely to reoffend.”

Tom’s name has been changed.

To get help, call Stop It Now! Scotland confidentially on 0131-556 3535 or visit get-help.stopitnow.org.uk

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Dani Garavelli"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485675.1498334233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485675.1498334233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Tom admits that he had looked at adult pornography for most of his life. Photograph: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Tom admits that he had looked at adult pornography for most of his life. Photograph: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485675.1498334233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/leader-organised-panic-unavoidable-after-grenfell-tower-1-4485783","id":"1.4485783","articleHeadline": "Leader: Organised panic unavoidable after Grenfell Tower","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498345201000 ,"articleLead": "

It didn’t take long after the Grenfell Tower tragedy for the wider repercussions to emerge. If there was a design flaw in the tower which contributed to the resulting inferno, then other buildings could have a similar problem. If this was established, these buildings would inevitably be deemed unsafe until such time as sufficient testing was cried out to establish that they were fit for habitation, or until the flaw was remedied. And in such circumstances, no local authority could take the risk of keeping residents in situ.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485782.1498339434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Camden Council leader Georgia Gould. Picture: David Mirzoeff/PA"} ,"articleBody": "

It is deeply unfortunate that tower blocks in the London borough of Camden were ruled to have serious safety concerns at a time when evacuation involved clearing the buildings on Friday evening and through the night into Saturday morning, but after the fire service said it could not guarantee the safety of those in the blocks, the council faced no option but to move residents out.

If the situation appears to be chaotic, that too is unfortunate, but that is the nature of any emergency or evacuation. Long-term tenants who are understandably upset at the upheaval in their lives state that there has never been a problem in the building before. Sadly, most devastating fires could be set against the same kind of history.

This is justified “panic”, if one of the possible consequences of failing to act is another disaster. Local authorities cannot fall back on the laws of probability to make a safety judgment on this scale.

“I know it’s difficult, but Grenfell changes everything,” said Camden Council leader Georgia Gould. She’s right.

The next step is to ensure that all buildings – not simply housing blocks – are tested. There will be upheaval, inconvenience and uncertainty, but it is work that must be done. There will be repercussions over how this crisis came about, but right now, immediate safety is the No 1 priority for all residents.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485782.1498339434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485782.1498339434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Camden Council leader Georgia Gould. Picture: David Mirzoeff/PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Camden Council leader Georgia Gould. Picture: David Mirzoeff/PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485782.1498339434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/jeremy-corbyn-wows-the-crowds-at-glastonbury-festival-1-4485636","id":"1.4485636","articleHeadline": "Jeremy Corbyn wows the crowds at Glastonbury festival","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498330345000 ,"articleLead": "

LABOUR leader Jeremy Corbyn received a rapturous welcome as he took to the stage at the Glastonbury Festival.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485634.1498330336!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Britain's opposition Labour party Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses the crowd from the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival. Picture: Oli SCARFFOLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Corbyn appeared at the Pyramid Stage where he pledged his support to refugees, young people and the environment and took a swipe at US president Donald Trump.

Corbyn said: “Look, on the wall that surrounds this festival and there is a message on that wall for president Donald Trump ... build bridges, not walls.

“What was fascinating about the last seven weeks of election campaigning around Britain is that the commentariat got it wrong, the elites got it wrong.

“Politics is about the lives of all of us and the wonderful campaign that I was proud to lead brought a lot of people back into politics because they believed there was something on offer for them.

“What was even more inspiring was the number of young people who got involved for the very first time because they were fed up with being told they don’t matter and that their generation was going to pay more to get less in education, housing, health, pensions and everything else.

“Well, it didn’t quite work out like that and that politics that got out of the box, is not going back in any box because we are there demanding an achievement of something very different in our society.”

He explained that the five-day festival was about “coming together” and symbolised the importance of the environment and peace.

Corbyn continued: “Let’s stop the denigration of refugees, people looking for a place of safety in a cruel and dangerous world. Let’s support them in their hour of need, not see them as a threat and a danger.”

Spreading his message 
to global issues, he added: “Let’s tackle the causes of war, the greed for natural resources, the denial of human rights, the irrational imprisonment of political opponents.”

The politician shared his own memories of visiting Glastonbury Tor as a child and described it as a “magical area” and a place where “people come together and achieve things”.

He paid tribute to suffragettes and other people through history who “laid down their lives” for democracy and justice as he condemned racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of discrimination.

He also praised the festival for inspiring arts and music and for promoting the importance of protecting the environment. He said there was only one earth and joked: “Even Donald Trump doesn’t believe there is another planet somewhere else.”

Michael Vale, 28, from London, said: “I’m not sure they’d get Theresa to do this.

“I wore a Corbyn t-shirt last year. I think he’s a wonderful man and I think it’s great that he is getting in touch with young voters.”

Holly Maddick, 19, from Buckinghamshire, said: “I think he’s a really cool guy.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CLAIRE HAYHURST"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485634.1498330336!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485634.1498330336!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Britain's opposition Labour party Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses the crowd from the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival. Picture: Oli SCARFFOLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Britain's opposition Labour party Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses the crowd from the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival. Picture: Oli SCARFFOLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485634.1498330336!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485635.1498330345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485635.1498330345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Mr Corbyn was well recieved by the crowd. Picture: Ian Gavan/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mr Corbyn was well recieved by the crowd. Picture: Ian Gavan/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485635.1498330345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/culture/tv-radio/lulu-to-appear-on-new-series-of-who-do-you-think-you-are-1-4485549","id":"1.4485549","articleHeadline": "Lulu to appear on new series of Who Do You Think You Are?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498314082000 ,"articleLead": "

Scots singer Lulu is among the ten famous faces lined up for the next series of BBC ancestry programme Who Do You Think You Are?

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485547.1498314075!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Lulu, seen here performing in Glasgow, will examine her ancestry in the new series of Who Do You Think You Are? Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

Lulu, born Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie in 1948, will be joined by Game of Thrones actor Charles Dance, TV presenter Clare Balding and comedian Ruby Wax among others as they trace their roots and ancestry in the 14th series of the programme, due to begin on 6 July.

Lulu is not the first Scot to appear on the programme - Edinburgh-born TV presenter Nicky Campbell, who traced his adoptive family’s roots in Scotland and Australia; Doctor Who and Broadchurch actor David Tennant, who discovered ancestors with links to the Orange Order and the Bloody Sunday massacre; comedian and impressionist Rory Bremner; actor and director Alan Cumming; singer Annie Lennox and comedian and actor Billy Connolly have all appeared on Who Do You Think You Are? since it first aired in 2004.

The former Eurovision Song Contest winner is no stranger to unexpected revelations about family - during a book tour in 2002, Lulu came face to face with a cousin she never knew existed.

Eddie Lawrie, from Tollcross in Glasgow, queued up at the Sauchiehall Street branch of Waterstone’s with a wedding photo rather than a copy of Lulu’s autobiography.

Eddie and Lulu both grew up in Dennistoun, in Glasgow’s East End, but their families drifted apart.

Speaking at the time, Eddie admitted: “I was so nervous. I’ve been waiting all my life to meet her. I’ve tried to track her down before, but with no success.

“When I heard she was coming to Glasgow, I thought I’d give it a go. She seemed shocked, but she was very friendly. I think she was as surprised as me.”

Big Brother presenter Emma Willis, radio DJ Fearne Cotton, actor Noel Clarke, writer Adil Ray, EastEnders actress Lisa Hammond and Strictly Come Dancing judge Craig Revel Horwood will also delve into their past in the new series, with Revel Horwood uncovering another dancer in the family, while Clare Balding learns details about the possibly romantic relationship that her great-grandfather had with a male artist.

Included in the new series are trips to Uganda and the Caribbean, while Charles Dance - who portrays Tywin Lannister in Game of Thrones - looks to find out more about the father he never knew.

The series has become synonymous with high-emotion real-life drama as guests explore the often tragic and triumphant pasts of their ancestors.

However, the ten guests will be hard pushed to relive the drama of the previous series, in which EastEnders actor Danny Dyer discovered he was directly related to the British royal family.

Dyer - who plays pub landlord Mick Carter in the BBC soap - found that his 15 times great grandfather was Thomas Cromwell, a chief minister in the court of King Henry VIII.

Like many of the personalities who appear on the show, Dyer was taken aback by his family revelations, saying, “This is stupid, innit? I need to get my nut around it. And then I’m gonna treat myself to a massive ruff.”

Tom McDonald, BBC head of commissioning for natural history and specialist factual, said: “Following its recent Bafta success, this new series of Who Do You Think You Are? promises fascinating revelations from some of the UK’s best-loved actors, performers and presenters.

“The series continues to be our most-watched history series across the BBC – and I know viewers are in for a real treat.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RUSSELL JACKSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485547.1498314075!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485547.1498314075!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Lulu, seen here performing in Glasgow, will examine her ancestry in the new series of Who Do You Think You Are? Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Lulu, seen here performing in Glasgow, will examine her ancestry in the new series of Who Do You Think You Are? Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485547.1498314075!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485548.1498314081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485548.1498314081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Clare Balding, left, and Charles Dance will also appear in the new series. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Clare Balding, left, and Charles Dance will also appear in the new series. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485548.1498314081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/hibs-ace-marvin-bartley-in-bid-to-help-grenfell-fire-victims-1-4485519","id":"1.4485519","articleHeadline": "Hibs ace Marvin Bartley in bid to help Grenfell fire victims","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498307600000 ,"articleLead": "

Hibernian star Marvin Bartley has appealed to the sporting world to help him raise money for those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire so that they can start to rebuild their lives.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485518.1498307600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hibs ace Marvin Bartley has called on his friends in the sporting world to help him in his bid to raise money for the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire. Picture: Greg Macvean"} ,"articleBody": "

The midfielder posted a plea on Twitter as he urged his ‘friends in sport’ to help out by donating signed shirts or anything that could be auctioned or raffled off to raise money.

The 30-year-old wrote: “Since the disaster in London I’ve sat back and read people’s stories of losing loved ones, everything they own and in the worst circumstances, both.

“The more I read, the more I appreciate how this could have happened to any one of us, or close friends, or even our own family members.

“In light of this, I want to help raise money to offer as many people as possible a helping hand in rebuilding their lives.

“Imagine losing everything you own.

“I’m calling on all my friends in sport to help by donating a signed shirt or anything signed that can be put into a flash auction / raffle.

“All money raised will be donated to help these people in their time of need. Your help will be sincerely appreciated.”

The message has already been retweeted by Bartley’s fellow midfielder Scott Martin, Celtic’s Liam Henderson, who played alongside Bartley at Easter Road last season, as well as Reading winger Garath McCleary, Bolton Wanderers star Jem Karacan and Charlton Athletic’s Jason Pearce.

Bartley is no stranger to a good cause - the former Leyton Orient man and his girlfriend Sacha helped serve Christmas dinner at a temporary shelter run by homelessness charity Crisis last year.

Bartley said at the time: “Crisis have a shelter in Edinburgh and I live here now so I feel like I’ll be helping my local community. It’s something I’m very passionate about because homelessness could happen to anyone.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485518.1498307600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485518.1498307600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Hibs ace Marvin Bartley has called on his friends in the sporting world to help him in his bid to raise money for the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire. Picture: Greg Macvean","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hibs ace Marvin Bartley has called on his friends in the sporting world to help him in his bid to raise money for the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire. Picture: Greg Macvean","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485518.1498307600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/cladding-on-27-high-rise-blocks-fails-fire-safety-tests-1-4485454","id":"1.4485454","articleHeadline": "Cladding on 27 high-rise blocks fails fire safety tests","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498301408000 ,"articleLead": "

Cladding samples from 27 high-rise buildings in 15 local authorities have failed safety tests in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster, the Government has said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485453.1498301408!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A fire engine sits outside the Bray residential block in the Chalcots Estate. Picture: AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The Department for Communities and Local Government’s announcement comes amid a national safety operation to identify buildings with cladding like that used on the tower block in north Kensington.

Portsmouth and Brent were named along with Camden, Manchester, Plymouth and Hounslow as local authorities with buildings that failed tests.

READ MORE - Police confirm cause of Grenfell Tower fire

Four tower blocks housing up to 4,000 people on Camden’s Chalcots Estate have been evacuated over fire safety concerns.

Meanwhile, the latest patient figures for the Grenfell Tower fire show that six people are receiving care in four hospitals in London, two of whom are in critical care.

The news comes just hours after five council tower blocks in London were evacuated over fire safety fears.

Eight hundred households were affected, with some residents claiming they were only informed of the decision to evacuate at 8.30pm on Friday evening.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485453.1498301408!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485453.1498301408!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A fire engine sits outside the Bray residential block in the Chalcots Estate. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A fire engine sits outside the Bray residential block in the Chalcots Estate. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485453.1498301408!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/sienna-miller-speaks-out-on-film-industry-s-gender-pay-gap-1-4485458","id":"1.4485458","articleHeadline": "Sienna Miller speaks out on film industry’s gender pay gap","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498300346000 ,"articleLead": "

Sienna Miller has weighed into the film industry’s gender pay gap debate, saying she thinks women “should be compensated sometimes more than your male co-stars”.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The actress, 35, will soon be seen treading the boards on London’s West End in the award-winning Tennessee Williams play Cat On A Hot Tin Roof.

Miller will star as Maggie, often referred to as “Maggie the cat”, alongside Unbroken and former Skins star Jack O’Connell, who plays her husband, Brick.

The play tells the story of a Southern family who gather at their cotton plantation in celebration of Big Daddy, the family patriarch’s birthday, but lies, secrets and sexual tensions threaten the future for everybody.

She told The Daily Telegraph Review section when asked if she’d experienced the gender pay gap in films: “Yes… to a degree where it’s staggering.”

She added: “At the time, I felt grateful, even knowing what (my) co-star was getting, but actually you’re so leaned on as a woman to promote a film by doing magazine covers, by what you wear on red carpets… they rely on that so heavily that you really should be compensated sometimes more than your male co-stars for what you’re asked to do.”

Miller follows in the footsteps of actresses such as Kathleen Turner, Scarlett Johansson and the late Dallas star Barbara Bel Geddes who have played Maggie on stage, and it was Elizabeth Taylor’s portrayal in the 1958 film version that earned her a best actress Academy Award nomination the following year.

The play will run at London’s Apollo Theatre from July to October this year.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sienna Miller pictured with Lost City of Z co-star Charlie Hunnam. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485457.1498300345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/celebrity/billy-connolly/billy-connolly-awarded-knighthood-ahead-of-his-75th-birthday-1-4478393","id":"1.4478393","articleHeadline": "Billy Connolly awarded knighthood ahead of his 75th birthday","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498253100000 ,"articleLead": "

Billy Connolly has been given a knighthood in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List in a landmark year that will see him hit the milestone age of 75.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4478392.1497635648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Billy Connolly, pictured with his wife Pamela Stephenson, has been awarded a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours. Picture: Richard Young/REX/Shutterstock"} ,"articleBody": "

The Scots comedian and actor, affectionately known as the Big Yin, becomes a Sir in recognition of his services to entertainment and charity.

The accolade - handed out in the centenary year of the Order of the British Empire - comes 14 years after he was made a CBE in 2003.

The gong represents a high point in a notable year for the star, as he turns 75 in November. He has already been the subject of an ITV special celebrating his career this year and had three giant murals erected in his honour in his native city of Glasgow.

Connolly joked he should be called Sir Lancelot after being knighted because “Sir Billy doesn’t quite have the same ring” to it.

Upon learning of the honour, the comedian said he has been speculating about his new title and whether he will be referred to as Sir Billy or Sir William.

He told the BBC: “I am a little embarrassed but deep within me, I’m very pleased to have it.

“I feel as if I should be called Lancelot or something. Sir Lancelot, that would be nice. Sir Billy doesn’t quite have the same ring.”

Admitting he “hasn’t a clue” over how he will now be referred, he added: “I think it’ll be William, I don’t know if you get Sir Billy. I don’t have a choice.”

He said he would like the people he meets on the street to call him Billy or Bobby, “as usual”.

“Because I seem to have a very good rapport with the people in the street,” he added.

“And I’ve had it for years, and there’s a thing I love, if you see men digging in a hole, I like to say “Come on, get your back into it!”

“No wonder the country is in the state it’s in. And they swear and laugh and stuff, it’s good fun, I seem to have a great contact with the man in the street because I kind of am the man in the street.”

READ MORE: 10 comedians reveal how Billy Connolly influenced their work

In recent times the comedian has been candid about his on-going health problems - he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s three-and-a-half years ago - and the impact it has had on his life.

The Glaswegian is increasingly dependent on his wife, Pamela Stephenson, to move around.

Life with Parkinson’s has meant Connolly, 74, can no longer play the banjo - the instrument that led to him first performing on stage as part of the folk duo The Humblebums in the late 1960s.

Born in the Anderston area of the city, but brought up in Partick and later Drumchapel, Connolly began his working life as an apprentice welder at Alexander Stephen and Sons shipyard in Linthouse.

Away from work, he bought his first banjo from Glasgow’s famous Barrowland market and soon began playing gigs in music pubs across the city, such as The Scotia.

“(Parkinson’s) is the first thing I think about in the morning because getting out of bed is quite hard,” he said in an interview with the Daily Mail earlier this year.

“It’s a weird thing because it stopped me playing the banjo and it stopped me smoking cigars. It seems to creep up on everything I like and take it away from me.

“It’s like I’m being tested... ‘Cope with that, cope with life without your banjo. Now I’m going to make your hand shake so you can’t tie your fishing flies any more.”

Connolly rose to international fame in the mid-1970s after moving away from music to focus on stand-up comedy performances, but singing and playing the banjo remained a key part of his routines.

He recorded several comedic songs that enjoyed commercial success, including a parody of Tammy Wynette’s song D.I.V.O.R.C.E., which he performed on Top of the Pops in December 1975.

He met Stephenson, an actor and comedian, in 1979 and the couple married 10 years later.

Scottish Secretary David Mundell said: “Billy Connolly’s knighthood celebrates a truly great Scot, the irrepressible ‘Big Yin’ who has entertained millions, but also his dedicated charity fundraising. He is an ambassador for both humour and humanity, and this recognition is richly deserved.”

READ MORE: Billy Connolly ‘overjoyed’ at Glasgow birthday mural

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CHRIS McCALL"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4478392.1497635648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4478392.1497635648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Billy Connolly, pictured with his wife Pamela Stephenson, has been awarded a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours. Picture: Richard Young/REX/Shutterstock","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Billy Connolly, pictured with his wife Pamela Stephenson, has been awarded a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours. Picture: Richard Young/REX/Shutterstock","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4478392.1497635648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1497616603225"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/residents-evacuated-from-five-london-tower-blocks-over-safety-fears-1-4485209","id":"1.4485209","articleHeadline": "Residents evacuated from five London tower blocks over safety fears","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498249026000 ,"articleLead": "

Residents from five council tower blocks in London have been evacuated over fire safety fears in the wake of the Grenfell Tower blaze.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485207.1498246684!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Cladding has been removed from a building on the Chalcots Estate in north London after it was confirmed by the Government to have flammable facades. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Eight hundred households were evacuated in total, with some residents claiming they were only informed of the decision at 8.30pm on Friday evening.

Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said the buildings would be “temporarily decanted” to allow “urgent fire safety works” to take place.

The high-rise buildings on the Chalcots estate in Camden were being emptied after firefighters said they “could not guarantee our residents’ safety”, Gould said.

READ MORE: http://www.scotsman.com/news/police-confirm-cause-of-grenfell-tower-fire-1-4484465

She told Sky that a rest centre had been set up and residents were being found hotels and other accommodation.

She added: “People are on the ground now talking to residents, working with them to move them to the rest centre. It is happening immediately.”

The council had already announced that it would immediately begin preparing to remove cladding from five towers on the estate discovered in checks following the fire in north Kensington which killed at least 79 people.

In a statement on Friday evening Ms Gould said firefighters and council officials had inspected the estate on Friday and said the buildings should be emptied.

Ms Gould said that it was expected the work would take three or four weeks, adding: “We realise that this is hugely distressing for everyone affected and we will be doing all we can, alongside the London Fire Brigade and other authorities, to support our residents at this difficult time.

“The Grenfell fire changes everything - we need to do everything we can to keep residents safe.”

It came as four more victims of Grenfell Tower were formally identified, taking the known victims of the fire to nine.

Scotland Yard also revealed manslaughter charges are being considered by detectives investigating the blaze in the tower in west London, which had failed fire safety tests.

Chalcots resident Shirley Philips told Sky she was given no notice before being told she must leave her home.

She said: “I think it’s absolutely disgusting. We’ve had the fire brigade all day, Camden Council, police.

“I had a fire safety check done today. Why have they left it til half past eight on Friday night to start getting residents out? Where do they think we’re all going?”

London mayor Sadiq Khan said he was in contact with the council and emergency services.

He said: “There is a particular set of circumstances on this estate that make this necessary, which has been identified following good work between Camden Council and the London Fire Brigade.

“Fire safety checks are ongoing at other estates across the UK.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ANGUS HOWARTH"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485207.1498246684!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485207.1498246684!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Cladding has been removed from a building on the Chalcots Estate in north London after it was confirmed by the Government to have flammable facades. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Cladding has been removed from a building on the Chalcots Estate in north London after it was confirmed by the Government to have flammable facades. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485207.1498246684!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485208.1498246687!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485208.1498246687!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Thousands of people may be living in potentially dangerous tower blocks after at least 11 buildings were revealed to have combustible cladding similar to that thought to have fuelled the Grenfell Tower fire. Picture: David Mirzoeff/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Thousands of people may be living in potentially dangerous tower blocks after at least 11 buildings were revealed to have combustible cladding similar to that thought to have fuelled the Grenfell Tower fire. Picture: David Mirzoeff/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485208.1498246687!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/general-election/theresa-may-s-offer-to-eu-citizens-dismissed-as-insufficient-1-4485220","id":"1.4485220","articleHeadline": "Theresa May’s offer to EU citizens dismissed as ‘insufficient’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498247752000 ,"articleLead": "

Theresa May’s hopes for an early deal on the rights of expat citizens after Brexit suffered a setback when EU leaders gave a frosty reception to proposals which she unveiled at a Brussels summit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485219.1498248235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May arrives on the second day of a summit of European Union (EU) leaders. Picture: Aurore Belot/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

European Council president Donald Tusk said the UK plan fell below Brussels’ expectations and could worsen the situation of three million EU citizens living in the UK, while German chancellor Angela Merkel said they did not represent a “breakthrough” in Brexit talks.

Mrs May insisted that her offer was “fair and serious” and should reassure EU nationals in the UK that they will be able to go on living their lives as before.

But the PM stuck to her position that any extension of rights must be part of a deal offering similar arrangements to Britons living in the remaining 27 member states.

READ MORE: Michael Gove: Brexit could boost Scots fishing industry

She faced an allegation from former Cabinet colleague George Osborne of having blocked a unilateral offer which David Cameron and all other senior ministers wanted to make last summer.

An editorial in former chancellor Mr Osborne’s Evening Standard newspaper described Mrs May’s offer as “an act of self-interest dressed up as a gesture of international generosity” and accused the PM of blocking Mr Cameron’s preferred unilateral option as home secretary.

Confronted with the claim at a Brussels press conference, Mrs May responded: “That’s certainly not my recollection.”

The two-day summit ended with battlelines being drawn over the key questions of jurisdiction and the cut-off date for residency rights.

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said it was “inconceivable” to him that the European Court of Justice (ECJ) would have no judicial role in enforcing EU nationals’ rights under any future arrangements.

But Mrs May set her face firmly against ECJ involvement, while suggesting that expats’ rights could be protected by international treaty.

“They will be enshrined in UK law, they will be enforced through the highly respected UK courts, and of course if this is an aspect of the withdrawal treaty then it will be enshrined in international law as well,” she said.

Under the proposals which Mrs May outlined to fellow leaders on Thursday, all EU nationals who have been in the UK for five years will be entitled to “settled status”, granting them the same rights as their British neighbours to healthcare, education, welfare benefits and pensions.

Those with a shorter period of residency will be able to stay on to reach the five-year threshold and others arriving after a yet-to-be-defined cut-off date will have a “grace period” to regularise their status.

“This is a fair and serious offer,” she said.

“It gives those three million EU citizens in the UK certainty about the future of their lives and we want the same certainty for the more than one million UK citizens who are living in the European Union.”

Mr Tusk said that the offer would be subjected to line-by-line analysis by the Brexit negotiation team led by Michel Barnier.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ARJ SINGH"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485219.1498248235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485219.1498248235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May arrives on the second day of a summit of European Union (EU) leaders. Picture: Aurore Belot/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May arrives on the second day of a summit of European Union (EU) leaders. Picture: Aurore Belot/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485219.1498248235!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/general-election/theresa-may-blocked-attempt-to-protect-eu-nationals-1-4485214","id":"1.4485214","articleHeadline": "Theresa May ‘blocked’ attempt to protect EU nationals","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498247003000 ,"articleLead": "

Theresa May blocked David Cameron’s attempt after last year’s Brexit referendum to unilaterally guarantee that European Union nationals living in Britain could stay in the country, George Osborne’s newspaper has claimed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485221.1498247862!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "David Cameron led the losing Remain campaign ahead of the EU referendum. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

An editorial for the Evening Standard, which is edited by the former chancellor, said the entire Cabinet at the time agreed that EU citizens should be assured of their rights to remain without getting similar guarantees for UK expats.

But then-home secretary Mrs May “insisted on blocking it”, the newspaper said.

“Last June, in the days immediately after the referendum, David Cameron wanted to reassure EU citizens they would be allowed to stay,” the editorial said.

“All his Cabinet agreed with that unilateral offer, except his Home Secretary, Mrs May, who insisted on blocking it. A vote in the Commons earlier this year was only carried with a nod and a wink to Tory MPs behind the scenes that she didn’t really mean it.

“Since then, the Government has lost its majority and it seems likely that an opposition motion to grant EU citizens the right to remain unilaterally could be carried.”

The claim comes after the PM set out her offer on residency rights for EU citizens to a European Council summit in Brussels, which is conditional on British expats in Europe being afforded the same rights.

The Standard’s editorial said Mrs May should instead guarantee EU citizens’ rights without getting any assurances on expats, arguing that her current position is “an act of self-interest dressed up as a gesture of international generosity”.

Doing so would “almost certainly” force European countries to give the same guarantees, it said.

Under the proposals which Mrs May outlined to fellow leaders on Thursday, settled status will be available to all EU nationals who have been in the UK for five years, granting them the same rights as British citizens to healthcare, education, welfare benefits and pensions.

Those with a shorter period of residency will be able to stay on to reach the five-year threshold, and those arriving after a yet-to-be-defined cut-off date will have a “grace period” to regularise their status.

Liberal Democrat Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said: “It is a badge of shame that Theresa May blocked attempts to guarantee the rights of EU nationals after the referendum. It shows how cold and heartless she is.

“Now that mean-spirited decision is coming back to haunt her as we see an exodus of skilled EU workers, from nurses to academics.

“Simply setting out vague assurances without giving a clear guarantee or sufficient resources for the Home Office is not good enough.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485221.1498247862!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485221.1498247862!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "David Cameron led the losing Remain campaign ahead of the EU referendum. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "David Cameron led the losing Remain campaign ahead of the EU referendum. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485221.1498247862!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/ross-mccafferty-both-sides-still-unable-to-deal-with-brexit-1-4485157","id":"1.4485157","articleHeadline": "Ross McCafferty: Both sides still unable to deal with Brexit","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498240703000 ,"articleLead": "

We need politicians who can admit everything is up for negotiation when it comes to Brexit, says Ross McCafferty

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485156.1498241308!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Brexit negotiations between the UK and EU are underway. Picture: Jane Barlow/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

We are now one year removed from the Brexit referendum that resulted in a slim majority of UK voters backing the country’s departure from the European Union.

Politicians are marking the occasion in different ways – some Remainers are stepping up demands for the £350m that was famously plastered on the side of a bus at the campaign’s febrile height.

Nigel Farage, in typically modest style, shared a picture of himself celebrating what he dubbed ‘Independence Day’. The SNP challenged the ‘reckless’ positions of the now minority Conservative Government under Theresa May.

In Brussels, talk has turned to the practicalities of Britain leaving the EU. The status of EU migrants in Britain, and British migrants in EU countries, is first on the diplomatic agenda.

But it is the question asked on referendum day that is still causing headaches a year on and both sides are still struggling to free themselves of its constraints.

‘Remoaners’

Those on the Remain side have struggled to get to grips with how much of the decision to leave they believe was down to immigration or trade.

None of the major parties has mooted reversing the vote to leave and only the Liberal Democrats advocate another referendum.

Even Theresa May - the Remain voting but Brexit-embracing Prime Ministe - has been ensure of how much she should repent to win over the country.

Her seeming endorsement of a so-called hard Brexit in advance of the General Election might not have been the sole reason the Tories lost seats, but something has clearly damaged her party.

A train of thought suggests that the Prime Minister should have been more upfront about the challenges the country faces as Brexit looms.

Instead, she seems to have adopted the policy of the Leave campaign’s Boris Johnson, who said that he was “pro having cake, and pro eating it.”

Because there were uneasy coalitions on both sides of the debate, there seems to be a reluctance at the top of Government to risk alienating any core group of Leave supporters.

READ MORE: Poll shows majority of Scots want another EU referendum

With 17million or so votes in favour of Brexit there are potentially 17million different reasons for voting that way.

Some will prioritise cutting immigration, and all the economic consequences that entails, others, fuelled perhaps by decades of tabloid scare stories, want to roll back Brussels regulations.

In walking a tightrope of almost unquantifiable opinion among Leave voters, Mrs May, along with her opponents in Labour, risks finding herself in the chasm below.

A Leave vote paints a thousand words

For the rump of the Leave campaign, with their talk of betrayal as negotiations get underway, the struggle to grasp the question seems beyond them.

A handy trick for spotting whether someone, politician, commentator or otherwise, has failed to grasp the referendum is if they start a sentence with “We voted to...” and don’t end it with “leave the European Union.”

The single, inescapable truth of the question: “ Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?” - has apparently escaped many on the Leave side.

“The British people voted Leave to end the free movement of people” tweeted perennial UKIP leader Nigel Farage last year.

If Mr Farage believes that to be the case, he must have received a different ballot paper from the rest of the country.

Such statements have become de rigueur for Eurosceptics - their hitherto undetected mind-reading talents being put into full use on issues like remaining a member of the single market.

A year later, it shouldn’t be controversial to note the self evident truth: a simple (and slender) majority of the British electorate voted to leave the European Union.

Nothing more, nothing less. Everything else, as Theresa May is finding out to her apparent surprise, is up for negotiation.

With those negotiations intensifying, both Remain and Leave voters, the country at large, could be doing with a politician willing to be bold and admit it.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Ross McCafferty"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485156.1498241308!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485156.1498241308!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Brexit negotiations between the UK and EU are underway. Picture: Jane Barlow/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Brexit negotiations between the UK and EU are underway. Picture: Jane Barlow/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485156.1498241308!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/sport/tennis/tennis-star-dan-evans-admits-he-failed-drugs-test-1-4485111","id":"1.4485111","articleHeadline": "Tennis star Dan Evans admits he failed drugs test","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498236706000 ,"articleLead": "

British number three Dan Evans has revealed he failed a drugs test in April after testing positive for cocaine.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485110.1498247635!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dan Evans in action for Great Britain during a Davis Cup match. The British No 3 has admitted he failed a drugs test. Picture Ian Rutherford"} ,"articleBody": "

Evans, who is ranked 50th in the world, will now miss Wimbledon next month and could face a ban of up to four years.

The 27-year-old called a press conference at the Novotel hotel in London yesterday afternoon where, in a 70-second statement, he said he took the substance out of competition and for reasons “completely unrelated to tennis”.

Evans said: “This is a very difficult day for me and I wanted to come here in person to tell you guys face to face.

“I was notified a few days ago that I failed a drugs test in April where I tested positive for cocaine.

“It’s really important you know this was taken out of competition and the context was completely unrelated to tennis.

“I made a mistake and I must face up to it. I do not condone for one second to anyone that this was acceptable behaviour.

“I’ve let a lot of people down - my family, my coach, my team, sponsors, British tennis and my fans.

“I can only deeply apologise from the bottom of my heart. This has been an extremely sad and humbling experience.”

An ITF statement said Evans’ positive test was confirmed at the Barcelona Open and the player was charged on 16 June with an anti-doping violation.

The statement added: “As positive tests for non-specified substances carry a mandatory provisional suspension, Mr Evans will be provisionally suspended with effect from 26 June, under Article 8.3.1(c) of the 2017 TADP, pending determination of the case.”

The key ruling of the World Anti-Doping Code is Article 10.2.3, which says a ban for a “non-specified stimulant” like cocaine can be reduced from four to two years if “the player can establish that it was used out-of-competition in a context unrelated to sport performance”.

Five-time grand slam singles champion Martina Hingis was banned from the sport for two years in 2008 after she tested positive for cocaine.

Frenchman Richard Gasquet had been issued with the same suspension in 2009 but it was reduced to a little more than two months when the ITF’s tribunal panel ruled he had taken the substance inadvertently. LTA performance director Simon Timson said: “We are very disappointed at the news that Dan Evans has tested positive for a recreational substance. We absolutely condemn any form of drug-taking.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "AMY WATSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4485110.1498247635!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4485110.1498247635!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Dan Evans in action for Great Britain during a Davis Cup match. The British No 3 has admitted he failed a drugs test. Picture Ian Rutherford","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dan Evans in action for Great Britain during a Davis Cup match. The British No 3 has admitted he failed a drugs test. Picture Ian Rutherford","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4485110.1498247635!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/struan-stevenson-reprisals-are-not-the-answer-to-terror-1-4484921","id":"1.4484921","articleHeadline": "Struan Stevenson: Reprisals are not the answer to terror","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498228524000 ,"articleLead": "

We must not resort to reprisals following terror attacks, writes Struan Stevenson

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484920.1498229429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Media gather outside Finsbury Park Mosque in north London, after a van was driven into pedestrians near the north London mosque, leaving one man dead and eight injured. Picture: John Stillwell/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The Finsbury Park mosque attack in London is the latest horrific outrage to stun public opinion.

So many innocent lives have been taken in recent terrorist attacks that many people in the UK are now clamoring for an appropriate response.

The tit-for-tat nature of these events plays perfectly into the hands of the terrorists, whose aim is to set one section of society against another.

We must not allow this to happen. It is too easy to get caught up in debates about the proportional value of solutions that involve an increased security presence and those that call for deeper engagement with, for example,

Muslim communities, to identify and root out extremist voices within. But following the Finsbury Park atrocity, should we also be calling for deeper engagement and surveillance within primarily white, British communities to root out extremists?

Following the Manchester and London Bridge atrocities there was an inevitable reaction from certain factions of the public and even some factions of the political establishment that immediately attempted to lay the blame at the feet of our British Muslim communities.

This is a common knee-jerk reaction, which is not only logically unsound it is also terribly impractical, because the demonization and alienation of moderate Muslims from British society is just the outcome that the terrorists would like.

There is a naïve assumption that if moderate Muslims were just more vigilant, the authorities in Britain and throughout the Western world would never be caught off guard by new attacks. But Muslim communities are just as caught off guard as we are and they are no more to blame for the Manchester or London attacks than the majority of white Britons were to blame for the Finsbury Park mosque outrage.

The extremists who murdered indiscriminately in Manchester and on London Bridge are no more representatives of the Muslim community than the white driver of the van who allegedly ploughed into innocent bystanders outside Finsbury Park Mosque can be said to represent the majority white British community. These people are extremists. They are fanatics. We cannot and must not attempt to label the communities they come from in the same fashion.

People affected by the recent attacks need our support. It was heart-warming to see the response from all sectors of society for the survivors of each of these tragedies, in particular the horrific Grenfell Flats fire. Muslims, Christians, people of all religions and none, came together to provide money, clothing, food and shelter, confounding the hate preachers and lifting the dark shadow which has been cast over peace-loving people everywhere.

Britons of every ethnic and religious background must work together to make sure that police forces are given the assistance they need, that moderate and peaceful dialogue is maintained no matter what the underlying ideology and that the extreme fringe of Islam, right-wing fascists, left-wing thugs, or indeed any other religious or political movement are denied a platform anywhere in our society.

The extremists on both sides want us to believe that Islam and Western democracy are incompatible. Their objective is to force more and more impressionable people to take a side. But of course this is simply wrong-headed. Anti-democratic systems of government in places like Iran are not a consequence of the dominant religion, they are simply a blight on the region that prevents mainstream Muslims bringing their religion fully into the light of the modern world. Still, the world is full of Muslim citizens who are striving to achieve that goal, either by participating in and actively supporting the societies and political institutions of the UK and other Western democracies, or by struggling to bring a secular, democratic system of government to the Middle Eastern nations that gave rise to ISIS and other forms of violent, political Islam in the first place.

For example, in Paris on July 1, the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) will be holding its annual Iran Freedom rally, which in recent years has been attended by upwards of 100,000 Iranian expatriates and their European supporters, including hundreds of dignitaries from political and academic circles in various nations of the world. Each such event reiterates the 10-point plan for democracy and justice promoted by NCRI President Maryam Rajavi, a Muslim like the overwhelming majority of the organization’s members. The plan calls for a truly secular democratic government in Iran, where religion is separated from the state, the death penalty is abolished and men and women have equal rights.

A plan that repudiates the existing regime’s long history of sponsoring terrorism and bolstering sectarian conflicts in the region and throughout the world.

This and other gatherings of moderate Muslims should serve as a reminder to the people of the UK and Europe in the aftermath of recent terrorist attacks that there are Muslims all around us who dedicate their very lives to demonstrating the abiding compatibility between Islam and our cherished rights to live, believe and worship in freedom and peace.

Those of us who are not of the same faith and those of us of no faith must do everything in our power to promote that message and to recognize that the conflict at hand is not between Islam and the West, but rather between extremists and those who believe in coexistence and would defend the rights of all people from Britain to Middle East and throughout the world.

Struan Stevenson is president of the European Iraqi Freedom Association (EIFA). He was a member of the European Parliament representing Scotland from 1999-2014

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Struan Stevenson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484920.1498229429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484920.1498229429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Media gather outside Finsbury Park Mosque in north London, after a van was driven into pedestrians near the north London mosque, leaving one man dead and eight injured. Picture: John Stillwell/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Media gather outside Finsbury Park Mosque in north London, after a van was driven into pedestrians near the north London mosque, leaving one man dead and eight injured. Picture: John Stillwell/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484920.1498229429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/professor-wayne-powell-food-for-thought-at-the-biggest-agricultural-event-on-the-calendar-1-4483325","id":"1.4483325","articleHeadline": "Professor Wayne Powell: Food for thought at the biggest agricultural event on the calendar","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498222301000 ,"articleLead": "

Between 22 and 25 June, around 180,000 visitors are expected to visit the Royal Highland Show at Ingliston, near Edinburgh.

" ,"articleBody": "

While many will be there as a result of a direct connection to farming or rural life, ­thousands of others come simply to enjoy a great day out – sampling Scotland’s ­finest food and drink, being wowed by the fabulous livestock in the Grand Parade, and browsing the many stands showcasing the best in rural skills, activities and products.

Like other key organisations ­working to support the agri-rural ­sector, one of the main reasons we at ­Scotland’s Rural College promote our activities at the Highland Show is to tell the story of food and farming to non-rural audiences and, of course, how SRUC’s research, education and consultancy activities contribute to this.

With a recent survey revealing that nearly one in five young children in the UK thinks that fish fingers are made from chicken, I believe the industry still has some work to do to communicate its relevance to wider society.

This is particularly so given that the demands on agriculture and food production have never been more pressing.

The world’s population is racing towards nine billion by 2050. Here in Scotland and around the world, how and where people live and what they eat is changing.

That is ­having increasingly severe impacts on human health as well as on the ­enormous problem of ­wasted food at farm, supply chain and ­consumer levels. This is set against a ­formidable backdrop of climate change, ­dwindling natural ­resources and extraordinary political events.

Farming and suppliers have an unprecedented duty to ­provide ­nutritious, sustainable and ­ethical food, while contributing to ­economic, social and environmental progress. The planet’s future, and the health and happiness of families everywhere, depend on it.

Meeting these daunting challenges will need innovation, intelligence and cross-disciplinary collaboration at national and international levels. For farmers, it means being open to adopting new practices or embracing technologies that maximise profitability and sustainability.

We will be highlighting some examples at the show, such as a portable backfat scanner for assessing body condition of pigs; CT scanning for accurately measuring traits that can be used in sustainable breeding ­programmes to meet market demands; and data-gathering drones to help arable farmers increase yields and reduce crop damage.

The right workforce is also ­essential. As the complexity of food ­production and supply grows, we need ever more technical jobs ­requiring appropriate skilled and qualified people –the researchers to develop the new ­varieties of plants or to adapt the breeds of livestock ­farmers and crofters will take to ­market. The vets and agronomists to keep them healthy and free from diseases, the food ­technologists and nutritionists to devise new products, with marketers and media specialists to keep the information flowing to producers, retailers and consumers.

And that’s not to mention those who design and ­manufacture the hi-tech machinery forming another part of Ingliston’s farming and food shop window.

There is substantial demand ­within Scotland for newly qualified ­people. Research undertaken for SRUC ­suggested that 3,000 new jobs are currently being created each year across all land-cased sectors, including farming, forestry, horticulture, veterinary science, environmental management, ­aquaculture and much more. So the challenges we are tackling come paired with significant ­opportunities, ­particularly to ­countries like ­Scotland with ­outstanding assets across ­knowledge, expertise and business.

The success of our food and drink sector – and farming’s role within it – provides compelling evidence for what can be achieved and the ­Royal Highland Show offers an incredible platform for demonstrating that expertise.

So if you are passing SRUC’s stand at this year’s show please, don’t be afraid to step over the threshold.

Inside you will uncover some ­fascinating facts about what goes into producing your food, the variety of skills that are involved and the career opportunities that these can present.

Professor Wayne Powell is principal and chief executive of Scotland’s Rural College.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/finsbury-park-attacker-charged-with-terrorism-related-murder-1-4484590","id":"1.4484590","articleHeadline": "Finsbury Park attacker charged with terrorism-related murder","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498218064000 ,"articleLead": "

Police have charged Darren Osborne following the Finsbury Park attack.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484589.1498218064!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police have charged a man following the Finsbury Park attack. Picture; PA"} ,"articleBody": "

A van driver held over the Finsbury Park terror attack will appear in court today charged with murder and attempted murder.

Darren Osborne, 47, was arrested by Metropolitan Police shortly after the incident, outside a north London mosque in the early hours of Monday.

One man died and nine other people were taken to hospital after the van crashed into the area, which was busy with worshippers attending Ramadan night prayers at the nearby mosque.

A Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) spokesman said: “Today, the CPS authorised the Metropolitan Police to charge Darren Osborne with terrorism related murder and attempted murder following the incident in Finsbury Park in the early hours of Monday 19 June.”

READ MORE: Finsbury Park Mosque: Family of terror attack suspect ‘devastated’

Osborne, from Cardiff, has been remanded in custody to appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London.

Makram Ali, 51, from Haringey, died from “multiple injuries” following the attack outside the mosque, a post-mortem examination revealed.

Witnesses at the scene said he appeared to suffer a medical episode in the moments before the attack happened.

Mr Ali, a father-of-six and grandfather-of-two, came to the UK from Bangladesh when he was 10 years old and was said to be a well-known face around Finsbury Park through his regular attendance at worship.

A statement from Mr Ali’s family read: “We are devastated by the loss of a husband, father, brother and grandfather, Makram Ali, in this tragic event.

“Our father was a quiet, gentle man. He didn’t get involved in political or social discussion; he instead took comfort and enjoyment spending time with his wife, children and grandchildren, and he was always ready to make a funny joke when you least expected.

READ MORE: In pictures: Finsbury Park van attack

“We wish everyone to know what a loving man he was. He spent his whole life without any enemies, choosing a quiet life instead.

“We as a family have always believed that the actions of one person cannot be a reflection of a whole people and I have no doubt that our father would not wish for there to be any retaliation or recriminations and would urge people to remain calm and to pray for peace in these difficult times.”

finsbury

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484589.1498218064!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484589.1498218064!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police have charged a man following the Finsbury Park attack. Picture; PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police have charged a man following the Finsbury Park attack. Picture; PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484589.1498218064!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/police-confirm-cause-of-grenfell-tower-fire-1-4484465","id":"1.4484465","articleHeadline": "Police confirm cause of Grenfell Tower fire","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498211640000 ,"articleLead": "

The Grenfell Tower fire started as a result of a faulty fridge police have confirmed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484462.1498211636!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police have confirmed what caused the Grenfell fire. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Metropolitan Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack said the Hotpoint FF175BP model had not been subject to any product recall.

READ MORE: Grenfell Tower checks ‘failed to spot flammable cladding’

Witnesses at the scene of the 24-storey blaze in north Kensington on June 14 described hearing one resident claiming it was his appliance which was responsible.

The number of people to have died, including those classed as missing presumed dead, remains at 79, she said.

Ms McCormack said the tests carried out as part of the investigation were “small scale”, but added: “All I can say at the moment is they (tiles and insulation) don’t pass any safety tests.

“What we are being told at the moment by the Building Research Establishment is that the cladding and insulation failed all safety tests.”

She added: “Our investigation is to establish how the fire started.”

READ MORE: 600 high-rise blocks ‘could have same cladding as Grenfell Tower’

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484462.1498211636!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484462.1498211636!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police have confirmed what caused the Grenfell fire. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police have confirmed what caused the Grenfell fire. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484462.1498211636!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484463.1498211640!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484463.1498211640!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "At least 79 people have been killed in the blaze. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "At least 79 people have been killed in the blaze. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484463.1498211640!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1497605195097"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/markets-economy/martin-flanagan-chancellor-tries-to-ease-brexit-concerns-1-4484273","id":"1.4484273","articleHeadline": "Martin Flanagan: Chancellor tries to ease Brexit concerns","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498200815000 ,"articleLead": "

Chancellor Philip Hammond wants to reassure business that Brexit is not going to be quite as bad as the worst off-the-cliff, “no deal is better than a bad deal” fears.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484272.1498200814!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'It is questionable whether real EU clarity lies in Philip Hammond's gift,' writes Martin Flanagan. Picture: Neil Hanna"} ,"articleBody": "

The trouble is we don’t know how much Theresa May still remains privately wedded to limiting immigrant numbers and not accepting the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice.

It is a mess. The government still maintains Britain is leaving the single market and the customs union so that it can cut trade deals with the rest of the world.

• READ MORE: Markets and economy news

After what it believes was the economic self-harming of the Brexit vote – a year today – business wants a solution that is as close and frictionless as possible to being in that market or customs union.

Failing that, business wants as long as possible transition arrangements to ease the difficulty of divorcing the EU and forging new trade agreements globally.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Meanwhile, fears grow that a mixture of Labour and the House of Lords will make May’s negotiations with the EU virtually unenforceable.

Was it just a few weeks ago, before the Prime Minister demonstrated the emotional intelligence of a desk printer, that we thought she was all set for a thumping majority in the general election, to give her more clout and less back seat driver complications in the Brexit negotiations?

Hammond can try to reassure a rattled business community all he wants. But it is questionable whether real EU clarity lies in his gift.

We are on a political and economic ride that is really something of a magical, mystery tour for all of us. Europe looks on bemused.

No light at the end of tunnel for oil

Concerns about the oil glut continue, with an accompanying light yo-yo-ing of stock markets. The oil price has been below $50 since the beginning of June.

Opec deals on limiting production with non-Opec members like Russia, which initially seemed to draw a line under some of the anxiety, now look as if they largely flattered to deceive.

It has now become a platitude, but there doesn’t seem anything currently in the dynamics of the energy industry to suggest why oil should make sizeable gains any time soon.

The industry’s state is exactly what it says on the barrel.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "mflanagan@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Martin Flanagan"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484272.1498200814!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484272.1498200814!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "'It is questionable whether real EU clarity lies in Philip Hammond's gift,' writes Martin Flanagan. Picture: Neil Hanna","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'It is questionable whether real EU clarity lies in Philip Hammond's gift,' writes Martin Flanagan. Picture: Neil Hanna","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484272.1498200814!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/general-election/theresa-may-s-eu-citizens-proposals-cautiously-welcomed-1-4484205","id":"1.4484205","articleHeadline": "Theresa May’s EU citizens proposals ‘cautiously welcomed’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498198954000 ,"articleLead": "

Theresa May has won a guarded welcome from fellow European leaders for proposals which could see three million EU citizens win the right to stay on in Britain after Brexit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484202.1498198947!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Council President Donald Tusk pose during a EU leaders summit in Brussels. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The Prime Minister presented outlines of her proposals to a Brussels summit of the European Council, where leaders of the other 27 countries also agreed a process to move EU banking and medicines regulators out of the UK after Brexit.

Mrs May’s plan - coming on the eve of Friday’s anniversary of the historic vote to take Britain out of the EU - would allow EU nationals who have been in the UK more than five years to claim a new “settled status” entitling them to similar rights as full British citizens.

Those who have been in the UK for a shorter time would be able to stay on until they hit the five-year threshold for settled status, while others who arrive after a cut-off date will be given a “grace period” - expected to be two years - to regularise their immigration status.

READ MORE: May offers EU nationals the right to stay after Brexit

Speaking over dinner at the Brussels summit, Mrs May told leaders of the other 27 EU nations: “The UK’s position represents a fair and serious offer and one aimed at giving as much certainty as possible to citizens who have settled in the UK, building careers and lives and contributing so much to our society.”

She said the UK did not want anyone currently in Britain to be forced to leave.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the proposals represented “a good start”, but cautioned that there were “many, many other issues” before Britain could reach agreement on a withdrawal deal.

But Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte said there were “thousands of questions to ask” about Mrs May’s proposals, and Austrian Chancellor Christian Kern said the PM’s proposals were “a first step” which did not cover the situations of many EU citizens in the UK.

READ MORE: Status of EU nationals must be guaranteed - Nicola Sturgeon

The Prime Minister said she wanted to offer “certainty” to expats and ensure that families are not split up by Brexit.

But she made clear that the proposals would be adopted only if the same rights are granted to UK citizens living in the remaining 27 EU states in a reciprocal settlement.

And she set up a series of probable clashes with the European Union by suggesting she could set an early cut-off date for residency rights and rejecting a Brussels demand for the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to retain powers to enforce rights following Brexit.

Under Mrs May’s plans, EU nationals with “settled status” will have the right to stay in the UK and receive healthcare, education, welfare and pensions as if they were British citizens.

The cut-off date for entitlement to apply is yet to be set, but will come between the day when Britain formally notified Brussels of its intention to quit on March 29 2017 and the day when it finally leaves, expected to be March 29 2019.

READ MORE: Stephen Boyle: One year on from the Brexit referendum

Mrs May also promised that the system will be streamlined, doing away with the 85-page permanent residency application form which has provoked loud complaints.

It is thought that the UK is reserving the option of setting an early cut-off for residency rights in case there is a late surge of migrants arriving as Brexit approaches.

But the introduction of a “grace period” raises the prospect that large numbers arriving during withdrawal negotiations may be allowed to remain.

And the outline deal leaves questions unanswered over whether individuals with settled status will be permitted to bring in children or spouses and whether the new status will be subject to conditions other than length of residency. Further details are expected in a Government paper on Monday.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said: “The Prime Minister’s offer is too little too late and falls far short of the full and unilateral guarantee Labour would make.

“We believe there must be a clear commitment that there will be no change to the status of EU nationals in the UK. This is not only the right thing to do, but it will also help deliver a reciprocal agreement for the 1.2 million UK nationals living in the EU.”

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, said Mrs May’s plan “does not come close to fully guaranteeing the rights of EU nationals living in the UK”.

And Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron said the proposals “leave millions of people still facing unanswered questions over their futures here”.

The package is likely to meet resistance in Brussels, which has already published its own formal proposals which would guarantee the rights enjoyed under EU law to any European expat resident in the UK on the date of Brexit.

Other than the different cut-off date, the key point of contention to be thrashed out in talks between Brexit Secretary David Davis and the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier is likely to be over the question of jurisdiction.

The EU proposals would give the ECJ “full jurisdiction” for as long as citizens’ rights remain protected under the withdrawal agreement.

But Mrs May told her fellow leaders: “The commitment that we make to EU citizens will be enshrined in UK law and will be enforced through our highly respected courts.”

Meanwhile, the president of the European Parliament said the UK’s Brexit negotiating position was unclear following the inconclusive general election.

Antonio Tajani told BBC2’s Newsnight: “Before the election the May position was very strong. Now I think in the UK the situation, the opinion is more flexible.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484202.1498198947!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484202.1498198947!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Council President Donald Tusk pose during a EU leaders summit in Brussels. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Council President Donald Tusk pose during a EU leaders summit in Brussels. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484202.1498198947!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484203.1498198954!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484203.1498198954!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Discussing during a Brexit meeting in Brussels. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Discussing during a Brexit meeting in Brussels. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484203.1498198954!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498196544187"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/markets-economy/weaker-pound-gives-shot-in-arm-to-british-factories-1-4484172","id":"1.4484172","articleHeadline": "Weaker pound gives shot in arm to British factories","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498197906000 ,"articleLead": "

Manufacturers are enjoying their strongest pipeline of orders in three decades as the Brexit-battered pound helps boost demand for “Made in Britain” products.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484171.1498197906!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Brexit-battered pound helped export orders hit a 22-year high. Picture: David Davies/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The CBI’s latest snapshot shows that the balance of companies reporting that total order books were above normal leapt from +9 in May to +16 in June – the highest reading since August 1988. It revealed that export orders rose to a 22-year high.

• READ MORE: Markets and economy news

CBI chief economist Rain Newton-Smith said: “Britain’s manufacturers are continuing to see demand for ‘Made in Britain’ goods rise with the temperature.

“Total and export order books are at highs not seen for decades, and output growth remains robust.”

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

She added: “To build the right future for Britain’s ­economy, manufacturers and workers, the government must put the economy first as it negotiates the country’s departure from the EU.”

However, the survey also pointed to continuing price pressures, with manufacturers continuing to expect a sharp rise in average selling prices.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Scott Reid"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4484171.1498197906!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4484171.1498197906!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Brexit-battered pound helped export orders hit a 22-year high. Picture: David Davies/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Brexit-battered pound helped export orders hit a 22-year high. Picture: David Davies/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4484171.1498197906!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}