{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"politics","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/ten-arrested-during-edinburgh-fascist-rally-1-4403588","id":"1.4403588","articleHeadline": "Ten arrested during Edinburgh fascist rally","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490469061000 ,"articleLead": "

POLICE Scotland have arrested ten people following a fascist protest in central Edinburgh today

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403587.1490469056!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police made a total of ten arrests during today's demonstrations in Edinburgh. Picture Toby Williams"} ,"articleBody": "

Around 400 people outnumbered a group of 40 White Pride demonstrators in the protest held in Hunters Square and the Royal Mile on Saturday.

Police Scotland said three of the arrests related to religiously aggravated offences and the remainder were for minor public order offences.

Protesters against the demonstration included Tommy Sheppard, SNP MP, Ian Murray, Labour MP, Zareen Taj and Tasneem Ali, Muslim Women’s Association of Edinburgh, Richard Haley, Scotland Against Criminalising Communities and Donny Gluckstein, Unite Against Fascism Scotland.

Robina Qureshi, of Positive Action in Housing, said: “In an increasingly uncertain world, it has never been more important to speak up against hate and division and stand for unity and respect for diversity, Unite Against Fascism’s demonstration against White Pride reminds us all that the threat of modern day fascism is with us.”

A spokesman for Police Scotland said: “Edinburgh Division would like to thank local businesses and members of the public for their assistance and understanding during these events, which on the whole passed off peacefully.”

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" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "GRAEME MURRAY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403587.1490469056!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403587.1490469056!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police made a total of ten arrests during today's demonstrations in Edinburgh. Picture Toby Williams","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police made a total of ten arrests during today's demonstrations in Edinburgh. Picture Toby Williams","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403587.1490469056!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/video-white-pride-marchers-make-nazi-salutes-on-royal-mile-1-4403564","id":"1.4403564","articleHeadline": "Video: ‘White Pride’ marchers make Nazi salutes on Royal Mile","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490465541000 ,"articleLead": "

FOOTAGE has emerged of ‘White Pride’ protesters making pro-Nazi salutes in central Edinburgh, while a crowd of people vocally condemn their presence.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403562.1490465536!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police say there were around 40 White Pride demonstrators compared with around 400 anti-fascism protesters. Picture: Toby Williams"} ,"articleBody": "

Posted earlier today on Twitter by journalist @AileanBeaton, the short video shows at least two men raising their right arms in the air to make a ‘sieg-heil’ fascist salute outside the Tron Kirk on the Royal Mile.

Present on the busy street are what appears to be several so-called White Pride activists, surrounded by a crowd of anti-fascism protesters, police officers and the general public. A repetitive chant, “off our streets, Nazi scum,” can be heard throughout the video.

Police estimate that up to 400 protesters were present on the streets of Edinburgh today to oppose the ‘Nazi White Pride’ march, compared with around 40 far right activists. Speakers at the anti-fascism demo included MPs. the SNP’s Tommy Sheppard and Labour’s Ian Murray.

Anti-fascism group Unite Against Fascism Scotland said it was “delighted” that the far right turn-out was so low.

UAF spokesperson, Margaret Woods said: “We are delighted at today’s brilliant turn-out for the UAF demonstration against the nazis National Front. There is no place in our society for fascists and we always oppose any attempts they make to assemble or march. They will not be allowed to spread their vile racism, hatred and division in our community. The support for today’s demonstration from so many trade unions, anti-racist organisations and cross-party politicians shows the breadth of determination to ensure fascism will always be opposed in Scotland.”

Police made ten arrests this afternoon at the demonstrations at Hunters Square and the Royal Mile. Three of the arrests were for religiously-aggravated offences and the remainder minor public order offences.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "DIANE KING"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403562.1490465536!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403562.1490465536!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police say there were around 40 White Pride demonstrators compared with around 400 anti-fascism protesters. Picture: Toby Williams","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police say there were around 40 White Pride demonstrators compared with around 400 anti-fascism protesters. Picture: Toby Williams","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403562.1490465536!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1490462703320"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/party-divisions-must-end-now-says-labour-shadow-chancellor-1-4403434","id":"1.4403434","articleHeadline": "Party divisions must end now, says Labour Shadow Chancellor","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490456319000 ,"articleLead": "

The Labour Party must show “a new spirit of solidarity” and end internal splits and divisions, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403433.1490456314!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "John McDonnell addressing the Momentum Conference, in Birmingham where he called for an end to the Labour Party's internal splits and division. Picture: Richard Vernalls/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Speaking to hundreds of Momentum activists, he said: “We’re fed up with divisions and splits and arguments, we want to work together.”

He added: “We’ve got to engender now in the Labour Party a new spirit of solidarity.”

But he also spoke of ending “perennial leadership elections” and called for party-wide acknowledgement leader Jeremy Corbyn had been twice democratically elected.

Mr McDonnell also said Labour had “made mistakes”, but added he would not be surprised if hostile media used that admission for its headlines.

And he claimed Mr Corbyn had been “set up” for a coup, following the Remain campaign’s failure in last year’s EU referendum.

Mr McDonnell was addressing the inaugural Momentum annual conference in Birmingham’s trendy Digbeth area on Saturday, delivering a fresh call for party unity.

He started by remembering the Westminster terror attack, saying: “No-one will divide us, we are one race - the human race, and we stand together.”

Outside, pamphleteers were handing out Labour Party Marxists-branded news-sheets with the headline “(Deputy Labour leader) Tom Watson inflicts further damage on Labour Party.”

But inside, Mr McDonnell said it was time for an end to the splits and division inside the party.

Earlier, Mr Corbyn, in a pre-recorded message, told delegates: “Keep it up, keep it going and keep working together to build our movement to get Labour into government.”

Mr McDonnell joked that, at the beginning of the Labour leadership campaign, nobody - not even Mr Corbyn - seriously expected him to win.

He said: “I certainly didn’t and I chaired his campaign committee.”

Mr McDonnell claimed the party had then been “on-track” after Mr Corbyn was first elected leader, but the EU referendum result had opened the door to a leadership “coup” attempt.

He added: “They set him up to blame for that referendum and use that as the excuse for the coup.”

He also said: “We know we’ve made mistakes, no-one’s perfect, but I tell you our ambitions are such to transform society and re-distribute wealth and power.

“It is no wonder that the oligarchs that own our media are coming at us.

“It is no wonder those that have the wealth and power are fighting so hard to retain it.”

Mr McDonnell said the focus must now be on uniting behind key policy ideas like building new council houses, a fairer taxation system and protection for the NHS.

He added: “Those ideas will only come to fruition if we take the path of mobilisation again”, adding it was only possible “in comradeship with everybody else”.

The shadow chancellor said: “There are people in our party who we have different views with.

“We want to ensure that we work cooperatively with them.

“That we have that debate about those ideas, see if we can convince others about our ideas, and listen to theirs as well - listen to everybody.

“We want to build a party that is based on comradeship and solidarity.

“We’re fed up with divisions and splits and arguments, we want to work together.”

He joked: “If I can offer to have tea with Peter Mandelson, you can work with everybody else in this party as well.”

Mr McDonnell said: “We’ve got to engender now in the Labour Party a new spirit of solidarity.

“I don’t want leadership elections to be perennial affairs.

“We’ve elected a leader, we’ve elected him twice.

“We expect loyalty to that principle of democracy, not to the individual, but to the principle of democracy.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RICHARD VERNALLS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403433.1490456314!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403433.1490456314!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "John McDonnell addressing the Momentum Conference, in Birmingham where he called for an end to the Labour Party's internal splits and division. Picture: Richard Vernalls/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "John McDonnell addressing the Momentum Conference, in Birmingham where he called for an end to the Labour Party's internal splits and division. Picture: Richard Vernalls/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403433.1490456314!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/chocolate-bars-could-get-smaller-after-brexit-warns-cadbury-1-4403306","id":"1.4403306","articleHeadline": "Chocolate bars could get smaller after Brexit warns Cadbury","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490451929000 ,"articleLead": "

Cadbury has warned that its products may become smaller post Brexit with the company stating they may adopt ‘shrinkflation’ to offset cost of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403304.1490451924!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Products from Cadbury could be getting smaller after Brexit. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The other alternative of combating the effects of Brexit will see prices hike in an attempt to offset any losses from leaving the EU.

Despite the potential shrinking of chocolate bars and products, the firm remained committed to development in the UK.

The firm’s UK boss said Britain would remain its “home of chocolate manufacturing” and would maintain its factory in Bournville, Birmingham.

In an interview with The Guardian the UK boss for the firm, Glenn Caton said that ‘shrinkflation’, which would shrink the product but keep the price, would be considered. This would effectively mean that customers would pay more for less.

While acknowledging that the UK market remained huge to the success of the company, Caton said: “All we can do is to move to the times that we face.

“I am confident though because a £200m investment in the last five years is not something we are going to walk away from.

“I can’t guarantee anything forever but am I confident that we are still going to have world-class manufacturing and research sites in the UK for the long term? I do feel confident of that.”

The move is not the first ‘controversial move’ from confectionary makers.

Following Brexit with the parent company of Cadbury, Mondelez, reduced the size of its Toblerone bars by increasing the gaps between the triangular chunks. Despite the reduction, the price did not change.

A pack of Cadbury Creme Eggs has also shrunk from six eggs to five.

Freddo chocolate bars remain the same size but have increase to 30p in price.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "STEPHEN MCILKENNY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403304.1490451924!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403304.1490451924!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Products from Cadbury could be getting smaller after Brexit. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Products from Cadbury could be getting smaller after Brexit. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403304.1490451924!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403305.1490451925!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403305.1490451925!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Cadbury products could get smaller post-Brexit. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Cadbury products could get smaller post-Brexit. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403305.1490451925!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/tories-must-stop-dithering-and-start-investing-says-corbyn-1-4403373","id":"1.4403373","articleHeadline": "Tories must ‘stop dithering and start investing’ says Corbyn","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490450902000 ,"articleLead": "

Britain should not be afraid of debt or borrowing money to fund investment, Jeremy Corbyn has said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403372.1490450898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn who has said Britain should not be afraid of debt or borrowing money to fund investment. Picture; PA"} ,"articleBody": "

The Labour leader responded to Theresa May’s jibes that he wants to “bankrupt Britain” by insisting that taking on debt can save money in the long-run if it is used to invest.

Mr Corbyn said a Labour government would provide a “new economic settlement” which would involve investing to support tens of thousands of high-skilled, high-paid, high-productivity jobs and to decarbonise the economy.

Urging the Tories to “stop dithering” and start investing, he told the Welsh Labour conference in Llandudno: “Last week, the Prime Minister twice accused me of wanting to bankrupt Britain by borrowing money to fund investment.

“But as every businessperson knows there is a world of difference between borrowing for capital spending and borrowing to fund the payroll and day-to-day trading or service delivery.

“And as any home owner who has ever had a mortgage knows, taking on huge debt can save you money in the long run.

“We should not be afraid of debt or borrowing.

“At the end of the Second World War, the Labour government of Clement Attlee didn’t say, ‘oh dear, debt is 250% of GDP - let’s park those grand ideas about public ownership; a National Health Service, building council homes, or creating the protection of social security’.

“No. They built a country to be proud of. They established the institutions that made our country fairer, more equal and stopped people being held back.”

Mr Corbyn also called for unity following the Westminster terror attack.

“Our values of unity and solidarity are needed now more than ever,” he said.

“We know from previous occasions that some sick people have tried to sow division and hate.

“So please, look after each other, help one another and think of one another.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403372.1490450898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403372.1490450898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn who has said Britain should not be afraid of debt or borrowing money to fund investment. Picture; PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn who has said Britain should not be afraid of debt or borrowing money to fund investment. Picture; PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403372.1490450898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/brexit-eu-members-agree-to-act-together-at-different-paces-1-4403371","id":"1.4403371","articleHeadline": "Brexit: EU members agree to ‘act together’ at different paces","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490449646000 ,"articleLead": "

European Union leaders have agreed that member states should be allowed to pursue integration at different paces, days before Theresa May officially triggers Brexit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403370.1490449642!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "European leaders leave the courtyard of the Musei Capitolini ahead of a special summit of EU leaders to mark the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding Treaty of Rome. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The 27 other EU leaders were marking the union’s 60th anniversary at an informal summit in Rome without the Prime Minister, as thousands joined an anti-Brexit march in Westminster.

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker called Brexit a “tragedy” while European Council president Donald Tusk called for sustained unity after Mrs May invokes Article 50 of the EU treaties to begin the UK’s withdrawal on Wednesday.

But in a declaration signed by the leaders to end the summit, the EU27 acknowledged that they could not always be fully united on all issues.

It stated: “We will act together, at different paces and intensity where necessary, while moving in the same direction.”

Addressing the summit in an ornate hall on the ancient Capitoline Hill where the Treaty of Rome was signed on March 25 1957, paving the way for the formation of the EU, Mr Tusk said: “”Europe as a political entity will either be united, or will not be at all.

“Only a united Europe can be a sovereign Europe in relation to the rest of the world.

“Only a sovereign Europe guarantees independence for its nations, guarantees freedom for its citizens.”

Italian prime minister Paolo Gentiloni admitted the EU had “triggered a crisis of rejection” as its pace of development slowed, but insisted “we stand together and we move forward”.

It came as thousands joined an anti-Brexit march in central London, with Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, Labour MP David Lammy and Green co-leader Jonathan Bartley expected to address a rally in Parliament Square.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403370.1490449642!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403370.1490449642!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "European leaders leave the courtyard of the Musei Capitolini ahead of a special summit of EU leaders to mark the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding Treaty of Rome. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "European leaders leave the courtyard of the Musei Capitolini ahead of a special summit of EU leaders to mark the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding Treaty of Rome. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403370.1490449642!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/humiliation-for-trump-after-defeat-on-obamacare-repeal-1-4403283","id":"1.4403283","articleHeadline": "Humiliation for Trump after defeat on ‘Obamacare’ repeal","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490438403000 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump and Republican leaders have scrapped their bill to repeal “Obamacare” in a humiliating failure for the US president, when it became clear his flagship manifesto pledge would nosedive in the House of Representatives.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403281.1490438395!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The defeat was seen as a humiliating loss for the President. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Democrats said Americans could “breathe a sigh of relief” after seven years of non-stop railing against former president Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act health care law.

But Mr Trump said Obamacare was imploding “and soon will explode”.

Thwarted by two factions of fellow Republicans, from the centre and far right, House speaker Paul Ryan said Mr Obama’s health care law, the Republicans’ top target in the new Trump administration, would remain in place “for the foreseeable future”.

It was a stunning defeat for the new president after he had demanded House Republicans delay no longer and vote on the legislation on Friday, pass or fail.

But his gamble failed and instead Mr Trump, who campaigned as a master deal-maker and claimed that he alone could fix America’s health care system, saw his ultimatum rejected by Republican politicians who made clear they answer to their own voters, not to the president.

At the White House, a dejected but still combative Mr Trump said he had “never said repeal and replace it in 64 days”, though he had repeatedly shouted during the presidential campaign that it was going down “immediately”.

The bill was withdrawn just minutes before the House vote was to take place and politicians said there were no plans to revisit the issue.

Republicans will try to move ahead on other agenda items, including overhauling the tax code, though the failure on the health bill can only make whatever comes next immeasurably harder.

Mr Trump pinned the blame on Democrats, saying: “With no Democrat support we couldn’t quite get there.

“We learned about loyalty, we learned a lot about the vote-getting process.”

The Obama law was approved in 2010 with no Republican votes.

Despite reports of backbiting from administration officials toward Mr Ryan, Mr Trump said: “I like Speaker Ryan. I think Paul really worked hard.”

For his part, Mr Ryan told reporters: “We came really close today but we came up short. This is a disappointing day for us.”

He said Mr Trump had “really been fantastic”, but when asked how Republicans could face voters after their failure to make good on years of promises, he quietly said: “It’s a really good question. I wish I had a better answer for you.”

In the autumn, Republicans used the issue to gain and keep control of the White House, Senate and House of Representatives.

During previous years, they cast dozens of votes to repeal Mr Obama’s law in full or in part, but when they finally got the chance to pass a repeal version that actually had a chance to become law, they could not deliver.

Democrats could hardly contain their satisfaction.

“Today is a great day for our country, what happened on the floor is a victory for the American people,” said House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, who as speaker helped Mr Obama pass his Affordable Care Act in the first place.

“Let’s just for a moment breathe a sigh of relief for the American people.”

The outcome leaves both Mr Ryan and Mr Trump weakened politically.

For the president, this piles a big early congressional defeat on to the continuing inquiries into his presidential campaign’s Russia connections and his unfounded wiretapping allegations against Mr Obama.

Mr Ryan was not able to corral the House Freedom Caucus, the restive band of conservatives that ousted the previous speaker.

Those Republicans wanted the bill to go much further, while some moderates felt it went too far.

Instead of picking up support as Friday wore on, the bill went the in other direction, with several key politicians coming out in opposition.

Congressman Rodney Frelinghuysen of New Jersey, who chairs a major committee, Appropriations, said the bill would raise costs unacceptably on his constituents.

The Republican bill would have eliminated the Obama statute’s unpopular fines on people who do not obtain coverage and would have also removed the often-generous subsidies for those who bought insurance.

Republican tax credits would have been based on age, not income like Mr Obama’s, and the tax increases Mr Obama imposed on higher-earning people and health care companies would have been repealed.

The bill would have ended Mr Obama’s Medicaid expansion and trimmed future government financing for the national programme, letting individual states impose work requirements on some of the 70 million beneficiaries.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403281.1490438395!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403281.1490438395!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The defeat was seen as a humiliating loss for the President. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The defeat was seen as a humiliating loss for the President. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403281.1490438395!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403282.1490438399!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403282.1490438399!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan delivers remarks at a press conference at the U.S. Capitol after President Trump's healthcare bill was pulled from the floor of the House of Representatives. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan delivers remarks at a press conference at the U.S. Capitol after President Trump's healthcare bill was pulled from the floor of the House of Representatives. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403282.1490438399!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/glasgow-and-edinburgh-worst-offenders-in-food-hygiene-standards-1-4403177","id":"1.4403177","articleHeadline": "Glasgow and Edinburgh worst offenders in food hygiene standards","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490436324000 ,"articleLead": "

Authorities in Scotland’s two biggest cities have been singled out by a leading consumers’ association as among the worst offenders in the UK for monitoring food hygiene standards.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403176.1490436319!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Which? has warned of the need for an enforcement strategy on food hygiene. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto"} ,"articleBody": "

The City of Edinburgh Council has been named the worst performing local authority in Scotland, and the eighth worst anywhere in the UK, according to the Which? study.

The watchdog assessed the rigour with which nearly 400 councils ensure local businesses comply with hygiene rules, using data submitted to Food Standards Scotland and the Food Standards Agency.

It found that in Edinburgh, just six out of ten (60 per cent) medium- or high-risk premises met compliance levels for food safety, with 87 per cent of the thousands of establishments across the city rated for risk, putting it in 379th place out of 386 councils in the UK, according to Which?’s analysis In the Glasgow City Council area, some 72 per cent of medium- or high-risk premises passed compliance standards, with 82 per cent of establishments rated for risk. It placed 376th in the ranking of local authorities.

Elsewhere, a further five local authority areas in Scotland – Aberdeen, Clackmannanshire, Falkirk, Moray, and Perth and Kinross – placed in the bottom 10 per cent across UK. In Falkirk, just 57 per cent of medium- and high-risk businesses were found to have passed compliance levels.

With food hygiene heavily underpinned by EU regulations, Which? has warned of the need for a “comprehensive” enforcement strategy post-Brexit.

Alex Neill, Which?’s managing director of home services, said: “People expect their food to be safe, but there is clearly still work to be done. As we prepare to leave the EU, the government and regulators need to ensure that there is a robust, independent system of enforcement in place to give people confidence that the food they’re eating is hygienic.”

The City of Edinburgh Council said: “The council’s environmental health team robustly inspect and assess food premises, providing written advice and guidance on what they must improve in order to achieve a pass.

“The council does not accept that the database was designed to rank authorities in the way suggested. Many non compliances used to achieve this ‘ranking’ are often technical in nature which in no way puts the public at risk.”

A spokeswoman for Glasgow City Council said it took a “risk-based approach,” targeting resources to food businesses with the “highest risk.”

She added: “Urban authorities face particular challenges, dealing with a far greater number and turnover of food businesses. This is particularly true in Glasgow, which is Scotland’s largest authority.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "MARTYN McLAUGHLIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403176.1490436319!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403176.1490436319!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Which? has warned of the need for an enforcement strategy on food hygiene. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Which? has warned of the need for an enforcement strategy on food hygiene. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403176.1490436319!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/video-shows-parliament-gates-left-open-in-wake-of-terror-attack-1-4403264","id":"1.4403264","articleHeadline": "Video shows Parliament gates left open in wake of terror attack","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490431222000 ,"articleLead": "

Parliamentary security is facing fresh scrutiny after a video showed its gates were left open and apparently unmanned in the immediate wake of Wednesday’s attack.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403263.1490431217!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Security has been tightened following the incident on Westminster Bridge and the attack on Parliament. Picture; Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The footage, captured by The Times, shows the aftermath of the assault on New Palace Yard which left Pc Keith Palmer mortally wounded.

As armed officers swarm the cobbled forecourt having shot dead terrorist Khalid Masood, the imposing iron gate which allows vehicles to enter can be seen wide open.

No police officers are visible guarding the entry point, known as Carriage Gates, fuelling concern the attack might have been worse had Masood been followed by accomplices.

Pedestrians are shown walking past and at one stage a courier on a moped appears to enter unchallenged.

Yards away, separate footage showed Theresa May being rushed from the building and into a waiting car.

Although the gate was open for a matter of minutes, critics will use the brief security lapse to rebuke claims on Friday by Scotland Yard’s anti-terror chief that current arrangements were “proportionate”.

Mark Rowley told reporters that procedures for guarding Parliament had been designed so they were not “overly intrusive”.

“Our current arrangements have been developed with Parliament over many years and are designed to provide access to the seat of our government balanced with security that is proportionate but not overly intrusive,” he said.

Parliament’s main entrance has two sets of large metal gates allowing vehicles to go in and out of the estate and they have traditionally been left open during the day.

A pair of smaller, makeshift gates was introduced more recently with two police officers at each to check passes and allow cyclists, cars and delivery drivers to come and go.

Just inside the entrance gate, armed police are usually present and an unarmed officer sits in a booth by the exit.

Electronic ramps are depressed and barriers lifted further into the courtyard after passes are checked using handheld machines which flash up with a picture of the passholder.

More police, some armed, are usually present after the final checkpoint.

Former Commons deputy speaker Nigel Evans said security must be boosted after the attack, and described the outrage as “one of those things that by experience you learn” from.

He revealed that “lots” of MPs locked in the Commons chamber during the attack were discussing how to boost security in certain areas, but said far more checks are carried out at Carriage Gates than when he was elected in 1992 and a “bobby” would just “wave you through”.

The Tory MP told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I’ve got no doubts whatsoever that, under the Speaker (John Bercow), that he is regularly in touch with the Metropolitan Police, and that they will be talking about now, new security measures that will be there.”

Mr Evans added: “I’ve got no doubts whatsoever that there will be enhanced features of security, it’s happening on a regular basis, but following this tragedy security has got to be upped at the same time as still having a welcoming hand to members of the public to come and see how democracy works.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JACK HARDY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403263.1490431217!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403263.1490431217!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Security has been tightened following the incident on Westminster Bridge and the attack on Parliament. Picture; Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Security has been tightened following the incident on Westminster Bridge and the attack on Parliament. Picture; Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403263.1490431217!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/leader-comment-europe-s-change-has-to-come-1-4403111","id":"1.4403111","articleHeadline": "Leader comment: Europe’s change has to come","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490421600000 ,"articleLead": "

From any viewing of history it was a truly remarkable achievement. The signing of the Treaty of Rome by Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany to create the European Economic Community in 1957 came just 12 years after the end of the most brutal and damaging war, a war which had seen countries pitched against each other in a war of monumental casualties and horrific crimes against humanity. The bringing together of these countries in a belief that closer co-operation would help to prevent such destruction ever returning was a bold and inspiring move.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403110.1490379870!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ministers in Rome sign the treaties establishing the European Economic Community (the EEC) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). From left to right P.H. Spaak and Jean-Charles Snoy of Oppuers (Belgium), Christian Pineau and Maurice Faure (France), Konrad Adenauer and W. Hallstein (Germany), A. Segni and C. Martino (Italy), J. Bech and L. Schaus (Luxembourg), J.Luns and J. Linthorst Homan (Netherlands)."} ,"articleBody": "

Given that context it is entirely understandable to take the view that ever greater union would lead to ever greater security, easy to see why some would think that the terror and destruction of war was worth avoiding at even a high cost of loss of national sovereignty.

So has the passing of 60 years meant that we have simply forgotten the lessons of war, and are about to see the throwing away of all the benefits that European Union has brought?

The Brexit vote means the grand European project will change, but what that level of change is remains to be seen. But it seems unlikely that the European Union will soon be heading to the delightful sunny uplands of an ever-closer Europe.

There are divisions emerging. Greece wants to see a move towards greater social justice, recently the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg issued a joint statement calling for “different paths” of integration. But that does not mean the lessons of the past have been forgotten, but simply that there is confidence those dark days will never return.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403110.1490379870!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403110.1490379870!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Ministers in Rome sign the treaties establishing the European Economic Community (the EEC) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). From left to right P.H. Spaak and Jean-Charles Snoy of Oppuers (Belgium), Christian Pineau and Maurice Faure (France), Konrad Adenauer and W. Hallstein (Germany), A. Segni and C. Martino (Italy), J. Bech and L. Schaus (Luxembourg), J.Luns and J. Linthorst Homan (Netherlands).","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ministers in Rome sign the treaties establishing the European Economic Community (the EEC) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). From left to right P.H. Spaak and Jean-Charles Snoy of Oppuers (Belgium), Christian Pineau and Maurice Faure (France), Konrad Adenauer and W. Hallstein (Germany), A. Segni and C. Martino (Italy), J. Bech and L. Schaus (Luxembourg), J.Luns and J. Linthorst Homan (Netherlands).","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403110.1490379870!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/frank-bruni-trump-is-tweeting-towards-oblivion-1-4403120","id":"1.4403120","articleHeadline": "Frank Bruni: Trump is tweeting towards oblivion","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490421600000 ,"articleLead": "

Social media teases out the worst traits of this vindictive and impulsive president, writes Frank Bruni

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403119.1490383671!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Trump has found it difficult to exercise restraint on Twitter, making wild accusations."} ,"articleBody": "

Donald Trump faces a stark choice. He can tweet, or he can govern.

He can indulge his persecution complex, firing off missives that compare Barack Obama to Joseph McCarthy and U.S. intelligence officers to Nazis, or he can recognise it as a gateway to disgrace and irrelevance.

He can make his presidency about his own viscera, or he can make it about the country’s welfare. He can do what feels cathartic in the moment, or he can do what’s constructive in the long run. He can dabble in bright colours and shiny objects, or he can deal in durable truths.

I’m focusing on Twitter because it teases out his worst traits. It’s the theatre for vainglorious, vindictive, impulsive Trump, and it was the realm in which he made the wild accusations that Obama had wiretapped Trump Tower. On Monday, James Comey debunked those charges, certifying them as the gaseous fulminations we more or less knew they were.

And through much of Tuesday, Trump’s personal Twitter account essentially went dark. There was nothing from the hours around dawn, which is when he typically visits with his darkest vapors. There was only anodyne stuff later on: a shout-out to the scientists at Nasa, a salute to U.S. farmers.

Either someone in his orbit convinced him, at least briefly, of the damage he was doing and the miserable situation he’s in, or Trump himself summoned some wisdom and restraint. He must be capable of that. Can he continue it?

It could be argued that every presidency is a tug of war between private demons and the public interest, between the commander in chief’s indulgence of his own psychological needs and his attentiveness to the hard work of America. With Trump it’s a furiously pitched battle, and the demons are way out ahead.

One of them hasn’t received the attention it warrants. With all our condemnations of Trump the bully, we’ve overlooked Trump the bullied, which is the version more likely to bring him down. I mean the Trump who’s hell-bent on believing that he’s up against ruthless enemies; the Trump who must amplify every stride by casting it as a triumph over formidable odds; the Trump who’s throwing a pity party for himself the likes of which few of his predecessors ever attempted. His election somehow brought this Trump to the fore. In a paradox as strange as everything else about him, victory played handmaiden to a feeling of victimization: his own and the country’s.

It’s precisely that feeling — “a sense of persecution bordering on faith,” as Glenn Thrush and Maggie Haberman wrote on Monday - that brought about the wiretapping tweets.

But it has also brought about many other ill-advised tweets and ill-considered public statements, enveloping Trump in a foul air of grievance.

If it’s not the Mexicans taking advantage of him and of us, it’s the Australians or the Germans or the Chinese. Take your pick.

The “deep state” is out to get him. The leaks are a plot against him. Sometimes his mewling has an obvious prompt. When your approval ratings have sunk as low as his - a recent Gallup tracking poll showed that only 37 per cent of Americans were pleased with his performance - you have an obvious investment in calling such surveys rigged and wrong, as Trump is still doing.

But other whimpering is absurdly conceived and needlessly divisive. During Angela Merkel’s visit to Washington last week, he ranted about an unjust trade imbalance between Germany and the United States, crediting Germany with smarter negotiators. But there are no such negotiators. We trade not specifically with Germany but with the European Union as a whole.

It’s possible that he doesn’t know that. It’s also possible that he chose to disregard a detail that would have complicated and maybe nullified his complaint. Why let the facts get in the way of a tantrum that he then transferred to Twitter, where he bellowed that Germany owed money for its defence to the United States and Nato?

It’s funny: Comey’s testimony on Monday made clear that someone does have a right to feel put upon. That someone is Hillary Clinton. He stressed how “hated” she was by Vladimir Putin. He also confirmed that before Election Day, intelligence officers were looking into whether Putin and the Russians were meddling in the election because of that hatred. At the time Comey said nothing about that, even as he announced that the FBI was taking a fresh look at newly discovered Clinton emails.

Trump is no victim. He’s the luckiest man alive - or has been, until now.

But his allies “have begun to wonder if his need for self-expression, often on social media, will exceed his instinct for self-preservation,” Thrush and Haberman wrote. He can vent his emotions or exercise his responsibilities. The decision belongs to him, the consequences to all of us.

© 2017 New York Times News Service

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "FRANK BRUNI"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403119.1490383671!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403119.1490383671!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "President Trump has found it difficult to exercise restraint on Twitter, making wild accusations.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Trump has found it difficult to exercise restraint on Twitter, making wild accusations.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403119.1490383671!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/stephen-jardine-no-home-grown-replacements-for-migrant-labour-1-4403133","id":"1.4403133","articleHeadline": "Stephen Jardine: No home-grown replacements for migrant labour","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490421600000 ,"articleLead": "

With two years of negotiations ahead leading up to Brexit, there is so much to sort out. From trade tarrifs to free movement for citizens, it’s hard to know where the politicians should begin. Scottish strawberry picking is unlikely to be high on the list of causes for concern during talks in Brussels but it symbolises a much wider problem.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403134.1490385315!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The soft fruit trade is worth �93m each year to the Scottish economy but it relies heavily on migrants to pick the berries."} ,"articleBody": "

With two years of negotiations ahead leading up to Brexit, there is so much to sort out. From trade tarrifs to free movement for citizens, it’s hard to know where the politicians should begin. Scottish strawberry picking is unlikely to be high on the list of causes for concern during talks in Brussels but it symbolises a much wider problem.

When it comes to food, drink and hospitality, we’ve become reliant on EU migrant workers. The human resources director of sandwich chain Pret a Manger recently revealed that of every 50 applicants for jobs with the company, only one is British. If that sounds far fetched, think about your recent experiences in any of the major out of home food chains. You are more likely to be served by someone from Bratislava or Barcelona than someone from Burntisland.

According to the British Hospitality Association, it will take up to 10 years for the major chains to replace their EU workers. The organisation warns some businesses will go bust unless agreement is reached to allow EU migrants to continue to work in British hospitality post Brexit. Scottish farmers will see that as a sensible proposal.

We have around 21,000 hectares of vegetables and soft fruit growing in Scotland, including crops grown under cover. Soft fuit production alone is worth an estimated £93 million a year to the Scottish economy with strawberries top of the heap. However the fragile nature of the fruit means all Scottish strawberries are hand picked and that requires migrant labour.

For decades eastern European workers have come here to pick soft fruit, often living in caravans on site and returning year after year. East Seaton farm near Arbroath employs nearly 400 temporary workers in a season stretching from April to October, over half of them are returning staff. Local councillor Bob Spink says their importance to the area cannot be underestimated.

“I believe there are about 5000 eastern Europeans working in Angus, all making a valuable contribution to the economy though their taxes and spend in local shops, and through the success of the farms who employ them, who supply most of the UK’s major multiple retailers,” he said. Even with notice and planning, it’s hard to see how the gap left by EU farm workers could be easily filled.

If temporary dispensation for some workers would help in the short term, the British Hospitality Association believes Brexit will require more fundamental change.

Giving evidence on recruitment policy to a House of Lords select committee, Pret a Manger’s head of HR said attracting British staff was tough. “We are not always seen as a desirable place to work,” said Andrea Wareham. Given the free food, paid breaks and pleasant working environment, that might seem surprising but hospitality often has a reputation for low pay, hard work and anti-social hours.

The British Hospitality Association believes the solution is more promotion within schools of non-academic careers as a good option for pupils at secondary school. The service sector in this country is undervalued as a career option and Brexit may force the industry to address that. For decades, the armed forces have successfully recruited on the basis of a smart approach to the job on offer. Rather than focussing on the kill or be killed aspect, the army, navy and airforce all emphasise the skills, camaraderie and travel opportunities a career in the armed forces can afford.

An industry-wide advertising campaign backed in schools may be what is needed to tackle the prejudices we have when it comes to careers in hospitality and the food and drink sector. Post Brexit, the answer to the skills gap is going to be found here at home and right now is when we need to start looking.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "STEPHEN JARDINE"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403134.1490385315!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403134.1490385315!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The soft fruit trade is worth �93m each year to the Scottish economy but it relies heavily on migrants to pick the berries.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The soft fruit trade is worth �93m each year to the Scottish economy but it relies heavily on migrants to pick the berries.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403134.1490385315!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/scots-teachers-subject-to-vicious-online-abuse-from-parents-1-4403197","id":"1.4403197","articleHeadline": "Scots teachers subject to ‘vicious’ online abuse from parents","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490400000000 ,"articleLead": "

Teachers in Scotland are facing increasingly worse “vicious” and “abusive” posts from parents on social media, an investigation has revealed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403196.1490396292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "One in seven teachers had experienced upsetting experiences on social media from parents. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

Teaching unions said that parents are subjecting their members to a range of abuse from threats of assault and mob justice to gossip about their private lives.

More than 1,000 members of the Scottish Secondary Teachers Association (SSTA) revealed that one in seven had experienced upsetting experiences on social media from parents.

A further poll by a primary teacher of teaching colleagues showed a fellow teacher being called a “nasty cow”, “bitch” and “the only teacher my daughter has ever hated”.

One teacher wrote “Made aware of a parent threatening to batter me on Facebook page”.

Another said: “Parents choosing to be offensive about a member of the department on [Facebook] – obviously didn’t think it would be seen by teaching staff as she wasn’t ‘friends’ with the person. Was all round the school. Police involved.”

Other instances included a parent noticing a teacher’s profile on a dating website who then tracked them down on Facebook, subjecting the teacher to regular harassment.

Seamus Searson, general secretary of the SSTA, said that abuse on social media should be treated in the same way as abusive behaviour from a parent who had come into the school.

“Parents need to realise that being on social media is not an opportunity to say disparaging things. It is the same as storming into a school and shouting at a teacher.

“Being subjected to this abuse is very undermining for teachers. They have to walk into a classroom knowing that many of the pupils will have been reading insults about them.”

The research also found that more than a third of teachers were not aware of their school having a social media policy.

Mr Searson said: “We want to see the local authorities taking the side of the teacher and challenging this threatening behaviour.

“We’re aware of some local authorities being very good at tackling it. However, despite instances increasing some head teachers don’t deal with it very often.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "SHN ROSS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403196.1490396292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403196.1490396292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "One in seven teachers had experienced upsetting experiences on social media from parents. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "One in seven teachers had experienced upsetting experiences on social media from parents. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403196.1490396292!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/scots-believe-holyrood-has-more-influence-than-westminster-1-4403029","id":"1.4403029","articleHeadline": "Scots believe ‘Holyrood has more influence than Westminster’","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490395329000 ,"articleLead": "

Trust in the Scottish Government has fallen since 2015, according to a new survey which also identified growing the economy as the top priority for the public.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403028.1490395325!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "For the first time more people thought the Scottish Government had most influence over the way Scotland is run than the UK Government."} ,"articleBody": "

Statistics released from the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey (SSAS) found fewer than half of those surveyed (40 per cent) last year trusted the Scottish Government to make fair decisions – a fall from the 49 per cent recorded in 2015.

Almost two-thirds (65 per cent) trusted the government to work in Scotland’s best interests – a fall from the 73 per cent recorded the previous year.

Trust in the UK government was lower with 25 per cent believing Westminster-based ministers worked in Scotland’s best interests and 18 per cent trusted them to make fair decisions.

More people thought that the Scottish Government had most influence over the way Scotland is run (42 per cent) than thought the UK government had most influence (41 per cent).

Three-quarters (75 per cent) of people said that the Scottish Government should have most influence over the way Scotland is run. Fourteen per cent said the UK Government should have the most influence

• READ MORE: Can Labour hold on to power in Fife?

Helping the economy to grow faster was the most commonly chosen priority for Scottish Government action (28 per cent).

More than half of respondents (54 per cent) said the economy had weakened over the past year, compared with 34 per cent in 2015.

More than one third (35 per cent) attributed the weakening economy to UK Government policy, 18 per cent to Scottish Government policy and 37 per cent to “some other reason”.

Yesterday Labour economy spokeswoman Jackie Baillie said: “It’s little surprise that more than half of those taking part in this survey said the economy has weakened given the Tories’ reckless plans for a hard Brexit.

The last thing Scotland needs is even more uncertainty, so this should send a strong signal to the SNP to drop its plans for a divisive second independence referendum.”

Lib Dem MSP Mike Rumbles said: “This survey recognises that the Scottish Government has enormous influence over the way this country is run and shows that people are desperate for the SNP to get back to the day job.

“Their independence obsession has resulted in fewer people trusting them to make fair decisions and act in Scotland’s best interest.”

Finance Secretary Derek Mackay claimed the survey showed the people trusted 
the Scottish Government to listen to their views and act fairly. He added that the Government shared the people’s views on the importance of the economy.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TOM PETERKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403028.1490395325!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403028.1490395325!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "For the first time more people thought the Scottish Government had most influence over the way Scotland is run than the UK Government.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "For the first time more people thought the Scottish Government had most influence over the way Scotland is run than the UK Government.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403028.1490395325!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/hero-mp-tobias-ellwood-appointed-to-privy-council-1-4403130","id":"1.4403130","articleHeadline": "‘Hero’ MP Tobias Ellwood appointed to Privy Council","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490387164000 ,"articleLead": "

‘Hero’ MP Tobias Ellwood, who battled to save the life of a police officer in the Westminster terror attack, has been appointed to the Privy Council alongside security minister Ben Wallace, in recognition of their roles in responding to the atrocity, Downing Street has announced.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403129.1490387161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Tory MP Tobias Ellwood battled to save the life of PC Keith Palmer after the Westminster terror attack. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

Prime Minister Theresa May praised the “extraordinary” bravery of Mr Ellwood in her House of Commons statement on Thursday.

The former soldier was pictured with blood on his face and clothes as he tried to give Pc Palmer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and stem the blood amid the carnage in New Palace Yard on Wednesday, but the officer died from his injuries.

The Bournemouth East MP’s bravery was praised by many colleagues, who had gathered in the Commons chamber to listen and respond to Mrs May’s statement on the terror attack.

But Mr Ellwood, whose brother Jonathan was killed in the 2002 Bali terrorist bombing, shook his head as a fellow MP called for him to be recognised in the honours list.

A Government spokesman said their appointments were “in recognition of their service as ministers and the roles both have played in responding to this week’s terrorist attack”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ANGUS HOWARTH"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4403129.1490387161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4403129.1490387161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Tory MP Tobias Ellwood battled to save the life of PC Keith Palmer after the Westminster terror attack. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Tory MP Tobias Ellwood battled to save the life of PC Keith Palmer after the Westminster terror attack. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4403129.1490387161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1490386291692"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/westminster-attack-muslim-group-raises-20k-for-victims-1-4402989","id":"1.4402989","articleHeadline": "Westminster attack: Muslim group raises £20k for victims","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490371768000 ,"articleLead": "

A Muslim organisation raised £18,000 in just 24 hours in support of the victims of the Westminster terror attack on Wednesday.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402987.1490371763!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers patrol on Westminster Bridge on Friday March 24. Picture: Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The Muslims United for London group set up a crowdfunding campaign in the wake of the atrocity and saw donations come pouring in within the first hour.

The money raised will be used to support victims and their families. Four people were killed and 40 injured in the attack on Wednesday afternoon.

Muslims United for London was established by Muddassar Ahmed, who was in the Parliament building during the attack. Along with several others, Mr Ahmed spent nearly five hours in the building while police secured the area.

A message on the fundraising page reads: “100% of funds collected through this campaign will go to the victims and the families of the victims most affected by the tragic events that unfolded on March 22, 2017, in our community.

“Though this is a Muslim-led campaign, we welcome our friends of other faiths and none to also contribute.

“We are overwhelmed by the generosity of donors from all over the world, from Muslim communities as well as those of other faiths and none.

“Having reached the £20,000 goal, we have increased the target to £30,000 in light of the increased interest to enable us to do more for the victims.

“This will be the final increase, but we do encourage people to keep donating until the end of the fundraiser.”

Mr Ahmed told The Telegraph newspaper that funds would likely be distributed through the police roll of honour trust but that the group was ‘exploring several options’.

A statement from Muslims United for London read: “The British Muslim community stands with the community during these difficult times and extends their support in raising funds to help with the immediate, short-term needs of the families of Keith Palmer, the other victims and the families of the victims.

“While no amount of money will bring back lives lost or take away from the pain the victims and their families are going through, we hope to lessen their burden in some way.”

At the time of writing the total raised was at just over £23,400.

The page can be accessed here

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402987.1490371763!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402987.1490371763!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers patrol on Westminster Bridge on Friday March 24. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers patrol on Westminster Bridge on Friday March 24. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402987.1490371763!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402988.1490371764!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402988.1490371764!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Muddassar Ahmed, who witnessed the attack from Parliament, set up the Muslims United for London group in the aftermath of the attack. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Muddassar Ahmed, who witnessed the attack from Parliament, set up the Muslims United for London group in the aftermath of the attack. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402988.1490371764!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/chief-medical-officer-calls-for-improvements-in-cancer-care-1-4402229","id":"1.4402229","articleHeadline": "Chief medical officer calls for improvements in cancer care","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490371084000 ,"articleLead": "

A call for groundbreaking data science solutions to improve cancer care has been launched today.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402228.1490351742!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A patients cancer journey leaves a data trail from diagnosis to treatment to recovery. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

The Cancer Innovation Challenge aims to inspire data and technical proposals to help Scotland become a world leading health system for people with the disease.

Chief medical officer Dr Catherine Calderwood launched the new programme on the last day of DataFest17 in Edinburgh – which has attracted international experts to celebrate data innovation and showcase Scotland’s world class data science capabilities.

A patient’s cancer journey leaves a data trail from diagnosis to treatment to recovery. The Cancer Innovation Challenge invites data scientists, technicians and clinicians to develop leading-edge solutions that will allow the NHS in Scotland to use this data to refine diagnosis, select treatments and improve the experience for patients.

This could be by generating analytical insights into care resourcing or useful ways of visualising large amounts of data on treatment plans or prescriptions. It will aim to enable patients to record experiences of their cancer journey and integrate the resulting data into NHS systems to improve patient care.

Dr Calderwood, said: “If used in the right way, data can be a vital tool in our efforts to improve services, treatments and outcomes for people with cancer. This Cancer Challenge is about finding innovative ways of using the data that exists, while continuing to guarantee patient confidentiality. I look forward to seeing the outcomes of this challenge, and the benefits it will bring to cancer patients and their families.”

The Cancer Innovation Challenge is funded by the Scottish Funding Council and is being delivered by three Scottish innovation centres – led by The Data Lab and supported by the Digital Health and Care Institute (DHI) and Stratified Medicine Scotland (SMS).

Gillian Docherty, chief executive of The Data Lab, said: “There have been phenomenal advances in cancer care in Scotland over the last decade, and while we understand the outcomes of patient care, time and funding constraints sometimes limit our ability to analyse how cancer services could be improved. The data industry will contribute £20 billion to Scotland’s economy by 2020 and data has the power to help better provide better cancer services.”

The challenge will work with healthcare professionals to create a safe, secure and anonymous environment, which will protect patient confidentially, for data linkage and analysis.

Open Cancer Data Dive events and a programme of public engagement activities will also be held as part of the initiative.

John Kemp, interim Chief Executive of the Scottish Funding Council, said: “A challenge to improve the prevention of cancer and care of people with cancer is good news for patients and for Scotland.

“Combining the different areas of expertise in the three innovation centres and the NHS will help Scotland become a world leading carer for people with cancer.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "KEVAN CHRISTIE"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402228.1490351742!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402228.1490351742!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A patients cancer journey leaves a data trail from diagnosis to treatment to recovery. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A patients cancer journey leaves a data trail from diagnosis to treatment to recovery. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402228.1490351742!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/westminster-attack-tourists-share-pc-keith-palmer-photos-1-4402900","id":"1.4402900","articleHeadline": "Westminster attack: Tourists share PC Keith Palmer photos","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490368526000 ,"articleLead": "

A man who met Pc Keith Palmer has said his murder “sent a shiver down my spine” as he shared a photo of himself and his daughters with the officer outside the Houses of Parliament.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402897.1490368520!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "PC Keith Palmer poses for a picture with Andrew Thorogood outside the Houses of Parliament in October 2016. Picture: SWNS"} ,"articleBody": "

In a post on Facebook, Andrew Thorogood, 41, a jeweller from Alice Springs, Northern Territory in Australia, said he had met the “genuinely nice bloke” last year and invited him to visit.

“We were in London last October and visited the Houses of Parliament. An officer by the name of Keith Palmer was happy to pose with us for a photo once he learned that we had travelled all the way from Alice Springs in the Northern Territory, Australia,” Mr Thorogood wrote.

“I spoke with Keith for quite a while and found him to be a genuinely nice bloke. He said he would love to visit Australia with his family one day. The girls suggested if he did make it to Australia, he should visit Alice Springs and we would show him how special a place it is.

“That will never happen now, all because he was doing his job and trying to keep people safe in the face of yet another crazy terror attack. Our thoughts are with his wife and family.

“With everyone so suspicious of everyone else these days, he was happy to chat and smile for a photo with a bunch of Territorians on holiday whilst still remaining vigilant and carrying out his duties as a police officer.”

Mr Thorogood later told the Press Association: “The last 24 hours have been somewhat surreal. I can’t begin to imaging what his wife is feeling.

“It strikes a chord because my wife is from Essex and we have a close affinity with the UK.

“The brief conversation and photo we had with Keith just makes it more personal.”

It comes as one of the final photos of Pc Palmer was shared online. The image shows tourist Staci Martin with the officer just 45 minutes before he was stabbed by attacker Khalid Masood, also known as Adrian Russell Ajao.

Ms Martin, on a visit from Florida to London, told ABC News: “It’s my first time in London and I see his hat and I’m like ‘I have to take a picture of him with his hat’.”

“I walked up to him and said ‘do you mind if I take a picture?’ He said ‘no problem’. He was really nice.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402897.1490368520!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402897.1490368520!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "PC Keith Palmer poses for a picture with Andrew Thorogood outside the Houses of Parliament in October 2016. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "PC Keith Palmer poses for a picture with Andrew Thorogood outside the Houses of Parliament in October 2016. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402897.1490368520!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402898.1490368521!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402898.1490368521!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The last picture taken of Keith Palmer, around 45 minutes before his death. Picture: Staci Martin/Facebook","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The last picture taken of Keith Palmer, around 45 minutes before his death. Picture: Staci Martin/Facebook","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402898.1490368521!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1490367191776"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/parties-face-off-over-schools-ahead-of-fife-council-election-1-4402893","id":"1.4402893","articleHeadline": "Parties face off over schools ahead of Fife council election","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490368429000 ,"articleLead": "

It’s Scotland’s third largest local authority, representing the interests of more than 368,000 people.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402891.1490368717!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Fife House, the seat of the local authority in Glenrothes. Labour formed a minority administration following the last election in 2012. Picture: Neil Doig"} ,"articleBody": "

Fife is also one of the most intriguing political battlegrounds in May’s council elections. While the SNP is widely expected to make gains - as it is across the country - a range of pressing local issues ensure that no party can afford to second-guess the outcome.

A housing boom centred around Dunfermline has transformed the west of the county since the turn of the century, with increasing numbers of Fifers commuting to work across the Forth in Edinburgh.

Concerns over school capacities and transport links have intensified as a result. While the opening of the Queensferry Crossing should help alleviate the latter, the education problem is harder to solve.

A further 12,000 new homes in West Fife are planned over the next two decades, with current projections suggesting five high schools will reach capacity by 2021 as a result.

Fife Council is planning to rebuild three of the five but admits it currently lacks the money to do so.

Local authority representatives met with education secretary John Swinney before Christmas to raise the issue but deciding a way forward will be the responsibility of whoever takes charge in May.

READ MORE: SNP confident of ending Labour’s 40 year rule in Glasgow

“We’re looking to obtain additional funding through the Scottish Futures Trust, as we have with other schools,” said council leader David Ross.

“There are plans being developed in the short term to deal with the situation, but ideally we want to build new schools.”

The last elections in 2012 saw Labour form a minority administration at the council chambers in Glenrothes after winning 35 of the 78 available wards, a net gain of 11.

That was enough to dislodge the sitting SNP-Liberal Democrat coalition. Although the Nationalists increased their number of councillors to 26, a collapse in the Lib Dem vote ensured there would be no repeat of their power-sharing agreement.

Labour, under Ross, will be looking to retain power when voters return to the polls on May 4, but the leader admits the party faces a strong challenge.

“I think we have a good record in Fife in looking after the local issues that matter to people,” he said. “We have overseen the biggest affordable house building programme in Scotland in the last five years.

“2012 was a high water mark for us,” he said. “It would be remarkable if we did as well this time.”

The SNP - under new leader Neale Hanvey - are confident they can emerge as the largest party this time around.

“We have a core support of people who were in favour of independence at the last referendum who will give us their vote because they feel passionate about it,” Hanvey said.

“But there are a lot of people who are not affiliated with any party or union - they are parents who have found out class room sizes are going up, or teaching staff have been cut, and they want someone to do something about it. Local issues in Fife will certainly feature in this election.”

READ MORE: Scottish council election turnout could rise thanks to indyref2

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CHRIS McCALL"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402891.1490368717!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402891.1490368717!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Fife House, the seat of the local authority in Glenrothes. Labour formed a minority administration following the last election in 2012. Picture: Neil Doig","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Fife House, the seat of the local authority in Glenrothes. Labour formed a minority administration following the last election in 2012. Picture: Neil Doig","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402891.1490368717!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402892.1490368718!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402892.1490368718!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Dunfermline High Street. The Fife town has been the centre of a housing boom since the turn of the century. Picture: Norman Wilson/TSPL","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dunfermline High Street. The Fife town has been the centre of a housing boom since the turn of the century. Picture: Norman Wilson/TSPL","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402892.1490368718!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/westminster-attack-brandenburg-gate-lights-up-in-solidarity-1-4402156","id":"1.4402156","articleHeadline": "Westminster attack: Brandenburg Gate lights up in solidarity","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490365475000 ,"articleLead": "

Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate has become the latest global landmark to be lit in the colours of the Union flag in solidarity with London.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402154.1490365467!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Berlin's landmark Brandenburg Gate is illuminated in the colours of the Union flag. Picture: AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Images of the iconic landmark - a symbol of unity in Germany - were broadcast around the world on Thursday evening.

On Wednesday, one side of Tel Aviv’s town hall was decked out in red, white and blue with the Israeli flag on the other in a show of solidarity with London.

The Eiffel Tower also went dark in tribute to the three victims of the terror attack in Westminster.

The attack comes three months after a similar attack in Berlin when a terrorist drove a lorry through the Christmas markets in the city’s Breitscheidplatz, killing 12 people and injuring 56.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Russell Jackson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402154.1490365467!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402154.1490365467!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Berlin's landmark Brandenburg Gate is illuminated in the colours of the Union flag. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Berlin's landmark Brandenburg Gate is illuminated in the colours of the Union flag. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402154.1490365467!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402155.1490365470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402155.1490365470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Brandenburg Gate is illuminated to pay tribute to the victims of an attack in London. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Brandenburg Gate is illuminated to pay tribute to the victims of an attack in London. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402155.1490365470!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/westminster-attack-500k-raised-for-keith-palmer-family-1-4402433","id":"1.4402433","articleHeadline": "Westminster attack: £500k raised for Keith Palmer family","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490364210000 ,"articleLead": "

Big-hearted members of the public have donated more than £530,000 to an online fundraising appeal set up for the family of murdered police officer Keith Palmer.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402432.1490349618!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A huge sum of money has been raised for the family of Pc Keith Palmer. Pictures: Getty Images/SWNS"} ,"articleBody": "

Pc Palmer, 48, died after confronting Khalid Masood inside the gates of the Palace of Westminster on Wednesday.

He was described by Prime Minister Theresa May as ‘every inch a hero’, while colleagues and politicians have been paying tribute to the officer.

The Metropolitan Police Federation set up the fundraising page on Thursday morning as a memorial to Pc Palmer, afer being inundated with requests from members who wanted to help.

Stephen Redgewell, who set the page up, said: “A quick thank you for all those of that have made your generous gifts in memory of Keith.

“It is heartwarming to see the messages that have been posted and those that have chosen not to post a message, the gift alone speaks a thousand words.”

At the time of writing, the total raised was at £537,329 - more than double the initial target.

A message on the page reads: “The Metropolitan Police Federation are raising money for the family of PC Keith Palmer, the Police Officer who tragically gave his life on 22 March as he guarded the Palace of Westminster from what is believed to have been a terrorist attack.

“Every day, all over London and the rest of the UK, Police Officers risk their lives to protect and defend us - in the wake of this tragedy our thoughts are with Keith’s family and all the people who are injured have lost their lives.”

Osman Yusuf, who donated to the page, wrote: “You gave your life for us and to protect our way of life. My sincerest condolences goes out to your family. We are proud to have men like you and you are the true heroes.”

An anonymous supporter said: “Just wanted to show my support for such a courageous officer. Thinking of all members of PC Palmer’s family and friends.”

Amelia Kerr added: “Thoughts are with family and friends at such a tragic time. From one colleague to another, your duty is done. Rest well xxx.”

Access the JustGiving page here

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402432.1490349618!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402432.1490349618!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A huge sum of money has been raised for the family of Pc Keith Palmer. Pictures: Getty Images/SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A huge sum of money has been raised for the family of Pc Keith Palmer. Pictures: Getty Images/SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402432.1490349618!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402462.1490361968!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402462.1490361968!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A floral tribute left by a member of the public sits next to a photo of Pc Keith Palmer in London. Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A floral tribute left by a member of the public sits next to a photo of Pc Keith Palmer in London. Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402462.1490361968!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/retail/iceland-owner-ditches-london-market-move-over-brexit-1-4402763","id":"1.4402763","articleHeadline": "Iceland owner ditches London market move over Brexit","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490362583000 ,"articleLead": "

Brait, the South African firm that owns supermarket Iceland, fashion chain New Look and gym group Virgin Active, has ditched plans for a London stock market listing because of Brexit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402762.1490362648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Iceland owner Brait blamed its decision on Brexit uncertainty. Picture: PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The group said last year that it planned to move its primary listing to London, but today announced that it will not proceed “in light of the uncertainty introduced by the timing and form of Brexit”.

• READ MORE: Iceland and Iceland at a stalemate over trademark dispute

Brait is backed by South African retail billionaire Christo Wiese, who also owns Poundland.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

The firm said: “While the board remains convinced of the long-term benefits to the company of a transfer to the United Kingdom and a premium listing on the London Stock Exchange, in light of the uncertainty introduced by the timing and form of Brexit and the potential impact on capital markets, the board has determined not to proceed with the transfer and premium listing at this time.”

• READ MORE: Pure Gym blames volatile markets for pulled float plans

The group’s decision follows a spate of other firms also pulling initial public offering (IPO) plans after the Brexit vote. Misys, TI Fluid Systems and fitness firm Pure Gym also abandoned plans to float last year.

Wiese’s other investment vehicle, Steinhoff, last year warned the collapse in the value of sterling following the EU referendum could have an adverse impact on its British businesses.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "RAVENDER SEMBHY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402762.1490362648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402762.1490362648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Iceland owner Brait blamed its decision on Brexit uncertainty. Picture: PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Iceland owner Brait blamed its decision on Brexit uncertainty. Picture: PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402762.1490362648!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/markets-economy/pre-brexit-exports-sweet-spot-unlikely-to-last-1-4402649","id":"1.4402649","articleHeadline": "Pre-Brexit exports ‘sweet spot’ unlikely to last","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490358150000 ,"articleLead": "

UK exporters are in a welcome “sweet spot” thanks to a boost from the Brexit-hit pound – but this is unlikely to last, according to a senior Bank of England policymaker.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402648.1490358146!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Deputy BoE governor Ben Broadbent said exporters could be hit by either higher trading costs or a stronger pound. Picture: Suzanne Plunkett/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Deputy governor Ben Broadbent said sterling’s plunge since last June’s vote to leave the EU may have hit households by fuelling inflation, but was providing a “boon” for many exporters.

• READ MORE: Cost of living fears mount as inflation hits 2.3%

In a speech at Imperial College in London, he said exporter profits were being given a fillip after the price of their goods rocketed by 12% in sterling terms last year, while they are also still able to trade as before the Brexit vote.

He described the UK as being in a “post-referendum” but “pre-Brexit” era, where the “costs and ease of exporting are unchanged but the returns to it significantly higher”.

“The result is something of a sweet spot for exporters,” Broadbent said, but he warned this would not last.

He said that either Brexit will lead to higher trading costs for exporters, as expected by financial markets, or the outcome will not be as bad as feared, which will push sterling higher.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

“Either the currency market is too pessimistic, in which case sterling’s depreciation is likely to be reversed over time. Or it’s not, in which case the costs of exporting will eventually go up.

“Barring some other source of exchange rate weakness, such as a sharp rise in the household saving rate (which would have its own implications for the economy), the sweet spot is unlikely to last indefinitely.”

Broadbent said the fall in the pound gave British firms and overseas groups a “powerful incentive to invest in the UK’s tradable sector”, but this was being held back by fears over the outcome of Brexit.

Businesses were already showing signs of holding back investment due to uncertainty over Brexit negotiations and may cut back further over the year ahead, he added.

• READ MORE: Central banks go separate ways on interest rates

He confirmed that the Bank’s interest rate-setting monetary policy committee (MPC) has “no particular expectation about the forthcoming negotiations”.

“The currency market could turn out to have been too pessimistic,” he added, but said the MPC expects caution as businesses are unwilling to commit to longer-term decisions.

The Bank predicted in its latest set of forecasts that UK annual growth rate would slow to 1.7 per cent in the fourth quarter, down from a surprisingly robust 2 per cent at the end of 2016.

The consensus among external economists are more pessimistic, however, with most predicting a slowdown to 1.2 per cent this year.

Prime Minister Theresa May will formally trigger divorce proceedings with the EU on Wednesday, with Article 50 kicking off an expected two years of talks.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "HOLLY WILLIAMS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402648.1490358146!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402648.1490358146!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Deputy BoE governor Ben Broadbent said exporters could be hit by either higher trading costs or a stronger pound. Picture: Suzanne Plunkett/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Deputy BoE governor Ben Broadbent said exporters could be hit by either higher trading costs or a stronger pound. Picture: Suzanne Plunkett/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402648.1490358146!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/markets-economy/scotland-aims-to-double-up-on-food-and-drink-revenue-1-4402350","id":"1.4402350","articleHeadline": "Scotland aims to double up on food and drink revenue","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490346545000 ,"articleLead": "

As industry leaders and politicians embark on a plan to double the value of the sector to £30bn by 2030, Scott Reid examines how the proposals will work.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402349.1490346669!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Industry leaders admit it will take a 'huge amount' of work to hit the Ambition 2030 goal. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

Scotland’s food and drink industry has been one of the real stand-out business success stories in recent years, supporting hundreds of firms from the major whisky distillers to small-scale artisan suppliers.

Exports have helped fuel stellar growth within the sector and now industry leaders have drafted a blueprint with the ambitious aim of more than doubling turnover to £30 billion by the end of the next decade.

• READ MORE: UK food and drink sales hit £20bn across the world

The appropriately named “Ambition 2030”, which was launched to much fanfare yesterday, will focus on building Scotland’s national brand as a “Land of Food and Drink”, driving sales not only north of the Border, but across the rest of the UK and globally.

Currently, the sector is worth just over £14bn in annual revenues, some 119,000 people are working directly in the industry and food manufacturing in Scotland is growing at twice the rate of the UK average. Industry body Scotland Food & Drink is confident that its plans will see those numbers accelerate over the next 13 years and it has developed a strategy that will focus on three key areas.

The first of those deals with “people and skills”. Industry leaders are looking to raise attractiveness of the sector as a career destination while investing in the existing workforce. There is likely to be a challenge there as pay has often been at the bottom end of the scale while Brexit uncertainties have raised concerns over the future supply of European migrant workers.

Secondly, a focus on the supply chain – ensuring farmers, fishermen, manufacturers and buyers work in closer partnership, with the goal being greater profitability shared across the industry. And the third key area identified in the bold growth plan is innovation – embracing “a new culture of developing new products and processes to drive growth”.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

The strategy has been developed by Scotland Food & Drink Partnership, an industry-led initiative bringing together the main organisations in the farming, fishing, food and drink sectors, alongside the Scottish Government and key public sector agencies.

In addition to those three key areas, the industry has made a renewed commitment to “responsible growth”, pledging to deliver broader benefits to the country beyond just a hike in collective turnover. This includes an offer of a new partnership with government and its agencies to drive improvements in Scotland’s health and wellbeing and to commit again to embracing “world-leading” standards of environmental sustainability.

James Withers, Scotland Food & Drink’s chief executive, says the 2030 strategy has identified collaboration as the most important ingredient in the sector’s success to date, with plans to strengthen those public-private relationships in the coming years.

“Ten years ago, when the Scotland Food & Drink Partnership was formed, our sector was relatively static. It is now one of the country’s best performing industries and it’s our fastest growing export sector. However, today sets out a new vision to build further on that,” says Withers.

“As an industry, we have identified an opportunity to more than double the size of our sector to £30bn by 2030, making it Scotland’s most valuable industry. A huge amount of work is required to unlock that potential and it will not come easily. There is uncertainty ahead, with Brexit in the forefront of everybody’s mind. Whilst big political upheavals are out of the industry’s control, we can control how we develop the Scottish brand, the markets we want to sell to and the investments we make in improving skills, innovation and supply chains.”

He adds: “It will take a huge amount of dedication from industry, government and its agencies, but working collaboratively, there is every reason we can make Scotland the best place in the world to run a food and drink business.”

The Ambition 2030 strategy has been endorsed by bosses of the industry’s single biggest sub-sector – Scotch whisky production, which already accounts for around three-quarters of Scottish food and drink exports.

Julie Hesketh-Laird, acting chief executive of trade organisation the Scotch Whisky Association, says: “Scottish food and drink is of significant importance to the country’s economic and export performance, with Scotch Whisky playing a leading role in growing the industry further.

“The new strategy will ensure that the whole sector will become even more substantial in years to come. And we’re confident Scotch whisky will remain the biggest contributor to the sector.”

Regardless of which direction Scotland’s political future takes, its burgeoning food and drink sector is likely to prove critical to its prosperity.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "sreid@scotsman.com" ,"author": "SCOTT REID"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402349.1490346669!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402349.1490346669!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Industry leaders admit it will take a 'huge amount' of work to hit the Ambition 2030 goal. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Industry leaders admit it will take a 'huge amount' of work to hit the Ambition 2030 goal. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402349.1490346669!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/farming/time-to-get-compensation-settled-for-tenant-farmers-1-4402336","id":"1.4402336","articleHeadline": "Time to get compensation settled for tenant farmers","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1490345269000 ,"articleLead": "

One of the longest-running disputes between landlords and tenant farmers took a marginal step toward conclusion this week in the Court of Session with a decision that the Scottish Government is liable to compensate a specific group of tenants.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402335.1490345367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Scottish Government has been urged to engage in mediation with affected tenants. Picture: Ian Rutherford"} ,"articleBody": "

The dispute goes back to the Agricultural Holdings Act of 2003 following which a number of tenants moved to a new type of lease. The legislation proved to be defective and a remedial order was passed in 2014 but by this time several tenants had been forced out of farming through the loss of security of tenure.

• READ MORE: Scottish tenant farmers face eviction due to ‘legal error’

The ruling this week by Lord Clark states that the government is liable to compensate the tenants “for loss directly arising from reasonable reliance upon defective legislation passed by it, which was then remedied by further legislation which interfered with the individuals’ rights”.

However he rejected the tenants’ claims based on the value of the tenancy, only accepting compensation should be paid in respect of specific losses directly sustained by the tenants who had acted in good faith on defective legislation plus something for “for frustration and inconvenience”.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Because the case had been brought to establish the principle of whether or not the tenants were entitled to compensation, Lord Clark said he was not in a position to quantify the scale of the compensation, which would vary according to individual circumstances.

Scottish Tenant Farmers Association director Angus McCall said it was unfortunate Lord Clark made no mention of the unnecessary suffering caused by the mishandling of the mediation process which did not get under way until it was too late.

“If mediation had been available in the immediate aftermath of the remedial order, when it should have been, it is highly that, some landlords and tenants would been able to reach agreement, with the government stepping in to assist where agreement was not going to be forthcoming,” he said.

“The time must now be ripe for the Scottish Government and the affected tenants to engage in mediation and reach a mutually agreeable settlement which will take away the need to spend yet more time and money in litigation where the only beneficiaries will be the legal profession.

“Let’s settle the matter and let the victims of this long-running tragic saga get on with their lives.”

Farmers and other employers should be aware of the added resources being injected by government into checking that workers know how much they are legally entitled to be paid.

Jamie Younger, of accountant Saffery Champness, said a recent increase in HMRC’s enforcement budget to £20 million would make more officers available to investigate national minimum wage complaints.

“HMRC can ask to see records to ensure that the correct levels are being paid, and has the powers to instigate criminal prosecutions or fines where they suspect that an employer is refusing or wilfully neglecting to pay staff at least equal to the National Minimum Wage, where proper records are not being kept, or where false entries have been made in records.”

In Scotland, the minimum wage payable to agricultural workers is set by the Scottish Agricultural Wages Board.

Younger urged all employers in the rural sector to be aware of the correct minimum wage levels and to ensure that their records were correct and up to date.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "andrew@andrewarbuckle.org" ,"author": "ANDREW ARBUCKLE"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4402335.1490345367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4402335.1490345367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Scottish Government has been urged to engage in mediation with affected tenants. Picture: Ian Rutherford","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Scottish Government has been urged to engage in mediation with affected tenants. Picture: Ian Rutherford","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4402335.1490345367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}