{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"news","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/hms-queen-elizabeth-not-vulnerable-to-cyber-attack-1-4487496","id":"1.4487496","articleHeadline": "HMS Queen Elizabeth ‘not vulnerable’ to cyber attack","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498558026000 ,"articleLead": "

Britain’s most powerful warship is not vulnerable to a cyber attack, the Defence Secretary has insisted, after fears were raised about its software.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487494.1498558019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ministry of Defence handout photo of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Picture; PA"} ,"articleBody": "

HMS Queen Elizabeth, the 280-metre, 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier that set sail for the first time on Monday, has computers running the same operating system that was hit by a cyber attack in May, The Times disclosed.

It found a computer in the control room was using Windows XP, an outdated system Microsoft no longer runs security updates on.

But Sir Michael Fallon insisted the security around the computer software on the aircraft carrier is “properly protected”.

READ MORE: HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier leaves Rosyth

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “It’s not the system itself, of course, that’s vulnerable, it’s the security that surrounds it.

“I want to reassure you about Queen Elizabeth, the security around its computer system is properly protected and we don’t have any vulnerability on that particular score.”

The largest and most powerful ship ever built for the Royal Navy is preparing to leave her home port for the first time.

The £3 billion aircraft carrier, which is set to be the nation’s future flagship, and her 700-strong ship’s company, are ready to undertake her maiden sea trials over the summer.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "SAM LISTER"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487494.1498558019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487494.1498558019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Ministry of Defence handout photo of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Picture; PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ministry of Defence handout photo of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Picture; PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487494.1498558019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487495.1498561630!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487495.1498561630!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navys largest and most powerful warship approaches the Forth Road Bridge","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navys largest and most powerful warship approaches the Forth Road Bridge","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487495.1498561630!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/scottish-government-ignoring-major-risk-of-nhs-shortages-1-4488203","id":"1.4488203","articleHeadline": "Scottish Government ‘ignoring major risk’ of NHS shortages","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498589812000 ,"articleLead": "

Doctors have accused the Scottish Government of “simply ignoring a major risk to the health service” by failing to deal with staff shortages in the NHS, the chair of the British Medical Association (BMA) in Scotland is set to claim.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488202.1498589809!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Doctors have warned MSPs not to 'ignore' staff shortages. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

Dr Peter Bennie will use a speech today to highlight the “unrelenting” pressures staff and services are facing - adding there are areas where the NHS lacks enough staff to “look after patients properly”.

Official figures show more than 400 consultant jobs across Scotland are unfilled while Brexit could spark an “exodus of talented staff” from the health service, Dr Bennie will claim.

He will say “urgent action” is now needed to tackle the problems, with the BMA calling on governments across the UK to increase the amount of cash that goes to the NHS.

The BMA’s Scottish chair will use his speech to the organisation’s annual representative meeting in Bournemouth to speak out about the issues medical staff are facing.

He will argue the public must be consulted about which services they want to see provided on the NHS as well as being told “honestly how much it will cost”.

Both the “financial difficulties facing the NHS in Scotland and the pressures on our clinical workforce are unrelenting,” Dr Bennie will say.

He will add: “Good health services cost money and health spending is a political choice.

“The UK spends a smaller proportion of its national wealth than the average levels spent by comparable leading European nations and the BMA is calling for that to change, in all four nations.”

On the “key area” of staffing, he will insist: “We simply do not have enough doctors in general practice or secondary care in Scotland to look after patients properly. The most recent government figures show that more than 400 consultant posts in Scotland are unfilled and almost half of these have been unfilled for more than six months.”

Junior doctor positions in many specialities “lie empty”, he will add, while more than a quarter of GP practices are “missing” senior staff.

Dr Bennie will say: “Scottish Government repeatedly says that ‘there are more doctors than ever before’ - but this is simply ignoring a major risk to the health service and it is demoralising and frustrating for doctors to hear time and time again.”

The BMA is calling for a “realistic approach to workforce planning in Scotland” to help reduce “the risk of burnout”..

Dr Bennie will also argue that many of the health problems doctors have to deal with are “due to many years of deprivation, inequalities and poor public health”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Katrine Bussey"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488202.1498589809!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488202.1498589809!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Doctors have warned MSPs not to 'ignore' staff shortages. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Doctors have warned MSPs not to 'ignore' staff shortages. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488202.1498589809!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/rail-policing-to-be-taken-over-by-police-scotland-1-4487402","id":"1.4487402","articleHeadline": "Rail policing to be taken over by Police Scotland","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498587368000 ,"articleLead": "

Controversial plans for railway policing to be taken over by Police Scotland have received final approval by MSPs.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487401.1498567149!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: TSPL"} ,"articleBody": "

The merger of British Transport Police (BTP) north of the Border with the national force was agreed yesterday by 68 votes to 53.

The Conservatives, Labour and Liberal Democrats opposed the move, which followed powers being devolved by the Smith Commission.

• READ MORE: Corbyn backs calls for transport policing merger to be scrapped

READ MORE: Police chief warns over ‘complicated’ Transport Police merger

The British Transport Police Federation also fought it.

Transport minister Humza Yousaf said the prime objective was to protect and advance the high standards of safety and security on Scotland’s railways.

He also sought to allay fears from BTP officers by pledging to retain the “triple lock” guarantee over their jobs, pay and pensions.

Mr Yousaf said they would “transfer over without any detriment to their terms and conditions”.

He said the merger would provide specialist resources to protect the railways, such as in counter-terrorism.

Justice secretary Michael Matheson said it would bring “a level of scrutiny over BTP that we have never had before in this country”.

However, opposition MSPs claimed the move simply followed SNP dogma.

Dumfriesshire Conservative MSP Oliver Mundell said: “This ill-judged and ill-thought out idea is before us for one reason and one reason only - this SNP Scottish Government’s constitutional and ideological obsession with control.”

He said it “goes to the heart of everything that has gone wrong on their watch”.

Labour transport spokesman Neil Bibby agreed it had been a “political choice” rather then necessary, and the railways would not be policed better or passengers be safer.

Labour justice spokeswoman Claire Baker said: “The SNP failed to listen to the long list of industry experts and railroaded this Bill through Parliament.

“There are clear financial and operational questions that still remain unanswered. This is an expensive plan to fix a problem that isn’t broken.”

Liberal Democrat transport spokesman Mike Rumbles said: “Ministers made up their minds long ago that they were right, and that those in the sector...were all wrong. That is neither sensible, nor healthy, but it is sadly characteristic.”

Police Scotland Deputy Chief Constable Johnny Gwynne said: “Police Scotland acknowledges the decision of the Scottish Parliament and will look to build on the good work of BTP to sustain and improve the delivery of policing services and meet the needs of the travelling public and rail industry across Scotland.”

READ MORE: Scottish Government urged to drop transport police merger plan

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALASTAIR DALTON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487401.1498567149!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487401.1498567149!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Picture: TSPL","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: TSPL","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487401.1498567149!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/farming/marks-spencer-building-science-into-beef-supply-chain-1-4487407","id":"1.4487407","articleHeadline": "Marks & Spencer building science into beef supply chain","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498550920000 ,"articleLead": "

A proposal that would see a ground-breaking partnership between Aberdeen Angus beef producers, their breed society, gene technology firms and a major retailer has been revealed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487406.1498551190!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'We need a science-based approach to delivering quality,' said Steve McLean of Marks & Spencer. Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Steve McLean, head of agriculture with Marks & Spencer, was addressing the 400-plus Aberdeen Angus World Forum delegates in Edinburgh when he said there needed to be greater collaboration between the links in the beef supply chain.

For the past 25 years, his supermarket has sold labelled Aberdeen Angus beef. It is currently taking just under 500 head of the breed per week in the UK to meet its customers’ demands.

• READ MORE: Farming news

However, McLean said he wanted to build on the iconic branding in the future through the use of modern science. Currently through gene technology, the company can trace meat back to the farm from which the animals were produced.

In the future, using technology that is currently being developed in the US and in Australia, more information on beef, including eating quality, would be added.

McLean said: “We know it [the retail market] is going to get tougher and we must never disappoint a customer. We need a science-based approach to delivering quality.”

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Thanks to the company already having a traceability scheme when the last food scare hit the industry in 2013, it escaped the reaction faced by other supermarkets.

But there was no resting on laurels for McLean, who said: “The sub-text is if we do what we have always done we will get what we have always got and that will not be good enough in the future. Over the next couple of years we will have to work harder so we do not disappoint.

“Science will be involved. Not just in proving traceabilty and authenticity but we will also have systems using gene marker technology. The challenge is to harness them to farmers’ and customers’ advantage.”

• READ MORE: Scotland’s red meat trade ‘in a good place’ says QMS

He was conscious that with the price of beef an all-time high, customers were very aware of what they were buying and he wanted to use the new technology to build in eating quality assurance.

“Combining genetics and feed regimes helps determine 30 to 40 per cent of the eating quality of the meat produced and that is a sound base for working on in the future,” he said.

McLean stressed the proposal would be a partnership and not the retailer taking a dominant position in imposing contracts, but he also admitted that it would not suit everyone.

For those committing to the new scheme, he said it should provide production efficiencies and encourage investment in the future.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "andrew@andrewarbuckle.org" ,"author": "Andrew Arbuckle"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487406.1498551190!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487406.1498551190!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "'We need a science-based approach to delivering quality,' said Steve McLean of Marks & Spencer. Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'We need a science-based approach to delivering quality,' said Steve McLean of Marks & Spencer. Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487406.1498551190!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/farming/ground-breaking-brexit-farm-policy-link-up-put-on-hold-1-4487400","id":"1.4487400","articleHeadline": "Ground-breaking Brexit farm policy link-up put on hold","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498549753000 ,"articleLead": "

When the move was announced late last year, some thought it a masterstroke allowing one of the experts in Scottish agricultural policy to influence Scottish Government thinking.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487399.1498549752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "NFU Scotland said that Jonnie Hall's 'skills and knowledge were not being fully utilised'. Picture: Andrew Cowan/Scottish Parliament"} ,"articleBody": "

Others of a more cautious nature worried that the embedding of Jonnie Hall, head of policy at NFU Scotland, within the civil service sorting out agricultural policy post-Brexit might compromise any future union stance.

As it has turned out, his part-time secondment has been terminated with a view that the Scottish Government was not yet in a position to utilise Hall’s experience.

• READ MORE: Farming news

NFU Scotland chief executive Scott Walker said: “Jonnie Hall’s secondment was a new approach for both sides to help formulate the right agricultural policy for Scotland in a post-Brexit future.

“Given the eventual Brexit negotiation timetable that has emerged since December 2016, we were both ahead of the curve, with discussions still firmly focussed on Brexit options rather than the detail of Scottish agricultural policy.

“As Jonnie’s skills and knowledge were not being fully utilised, both parties felt it was appropriate to end the secondment.”

• READ MORE: NFUS director Jonnie Hall seconded to Government team

The union said it also believed the number of specialist groups set up by the Scottish Government should be able to provide the necessary information on future agricultural policy.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

For its own part, the union will, later this summer, roll out its own discussion document, called Change – A New Agricultural Policy for Scotland Post-Brexit.

NFU Scotland also announced that it would be meeting the UK department of the environment, food and rural affairs on a monthly basis.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "andrew arbuckle"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487399.1498549752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487399.1498549752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "NFU Scotland said that Jonnie Hall's 'skills and knowledge were not being fully utilised'. Picture: Andrew Cowan/Scottish Parliament","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "NFU Scotland said that Jonnie Hall's 'skills and knowledge were not being fully utilised'. Picture: Andrew Cowan/Scottish Parliament","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487399.1498549752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/retail/debenhams-warns-over-volatile-trading-as-sales-fall-1-4487392","id":"1.4487392","articleHeadline": "Debenhams warns over ‘volatile’ trading as sales fall","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498548913000 ,"articleLead": "

Department store chain Debenhams has warned that “volatile” conditions on the high street could hit its full-year profits.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487391.1498549053!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Debenhams warned its profits could come in at the lower end of City forecasts. Picture: TSPL"} ,"articleBody": "

In a trading update, the retailer said sales slumped in the 15 weeks to 17 June, amid unpredictable trading and a weaker clothing market. Like-for-like sales fell 0.9 per cent in the period, or 2.4 per cent on a constant currency basis.

• READ MORE: Jobs at risk as Debenhams plans warehouse closures

“We currently anticipate that 2017 profit before tax will be within the range of market expectations,” the company said.

“However, should current market volatility continue, the outcome could be towards the lower end of the current range.”

Former Amazon Fashion boss Sergio Bucher, who took over as Debenhams chief executive in October, is attempting a turnaround of the firm and the figures show he has made some headway.

Sales of beauty, accessories and food and drink helped to mitigate the impact of a weaker clothing market, the chain said, with food sales rising 5 per cent. Group like-for-like sales in the year to 17 June rose 1.8 per cent.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

In April, Bucher revealed plans to close 11 warehouses and put up to ten stores under review, in a move affecting at least 220 jobs.

His turnaround will also see the group cull in-house brands and leave some international markets, while also shifting about 2,000 staff to customer-facing roles as part of a drive to lure shoppers back to its stores.

Bucher said today: “As industry data has confirmed, May was a tough month for retailers and we continue to see volatility in trading week to week.

“As a result we are focused on delivering cost control and self-help through our ‘Fix the Basics’ plan. We continue to build good foundations for longer-term growth.”

• READ MORE: Holiday costs push inflation towards four-year high

Inflation, which has soared since the Brexit vote, hit its highest level for nearly four years in May at 2.9 per cent, tightening the squeeze on consumer spending and hitting retail sales.

Julie Palmer, partner at Begbies Traynor, said: “With success on the high street so inextricably linked to consumer confidence, recent news of falling credit card borrowing in May, negative real wage growth and weaker retail sales volumes all suggest a tightening of shoppers’ purse strings.

“Unfortunately, with Debenhams reporting volatile trading in recent weeks, it looks like the retailer is feeling the sharp end of this.”

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Ravender Sembhy"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487391.1498549053!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487391.1498549053!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Debenhams warned its profits could come in at the lower end of City forecasts. Picture: TSPL","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Debenhams warned its profits could come in at the lower end of City forecasts. Picture: TSPL","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487391.1498549053!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/heineken-offers-to-sell-pubs-to-ease-punch-deal-concerns-1-4487365","id":"1.4487365","articleHeadline": "Heineken offers to sell pubs to ease Punch deal concerns","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498547814000 ,"articleLead": "

Brewing giant Heineken has offered to offload several pubs as part of efforts to satisfy competition concerns over its £403 million takeover of Punch Taverns.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487364.1498547813!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The competition watchdog is examining Heineken's swoop on Punch Taverns. Picture: Ian Georgeson"} ,"articleBody": "

The Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) said that the group has offered to sell pubs in each location that could see the deal impact competition and see drinkers face higher prices.

• READ MORE: Warning over higher beer prices from Heineken’s Punch deal

The competition watchdog had identified 33 areas of concern across Britain, but said that Heineken’s proposals, or a modified version of them, “might be acceptable to remedy the competition concerns it has identified”.

The CMA will now undertake a public consultation and decide by 22 August whether or not to refer the merger for an in-depth investigation.

The regulator has previously said the 1,895 Punch pubs being snapped up by Heineken, which it will add to 1,100 leased pubs it already owns across the UK, only account for 4 per cent of the market and are therefore “not a major route to market for brewers”.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Heineken sealed its deal last December to snap up Punch Taverns with private equity firm Patron Capital, having fought off a rival bid from the pub chain’s co-founder Alan McIntosh with a 180p-per-share offer.

Under the deal, Heineken would buy 1,895 pubs, while Patron would acquire 1,329.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Ravender Sembhy"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487364.1498547813!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487364.1498547813!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The competition watchdog is examining Heineken's swoop on Punch Taverns. Picture: Ian Georgeson","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The competition watchdog is examining Heineken's swoop on Punch Taverns. Picture: Ian Georgeson","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487364.1498547813!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/nicola-sturgeon-resets-indyref2-plans-1-4487869","id":"1.4487869","articleHeadline": "Nicola Sturgeon ‘resets’ indyref2 plans","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498580654000 ,"articleLead": "

Nicola Sturgeon said today the Scottish government will “reset” the plan on indyref2.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488099.1498580650!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks in the Chambers in the Scottish Parliament where she said the Government will reset indyref2 plans. Picture: SWNS"} ,"articleBody": "

The First Minister has said she remains committed to a second independence referendum but has conceded that the timetable should slip slightly following the SNP’s poor General Election.

The First Minister said she would not introduce her Referendum Bill “immediately” following the loss of 21 SNP seats, but would take stock in autumn next year on how and when to proceed.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon to formally dispute DUP deal

READ MORE: David Mundell’s position ‘becoming untenable’, say SNP

The “reset” of her referendum proposal means that her original plans to hold a vote between Autumn next year and Spring 2019 will be unable to be met.

Ms Sturgeon’s revised timetable is still in line with her ambition to hold indyref2 this parliament, although the vote would require permission from the UK Government through a Section 30 order.

In the meantime, Ms Sturgeon pledged to work to grow the independence movement and influence the Brexit process to protect Scotland’s interests.

Addressing parliament, Ms Sturgeon said: “It remains my view and the position of this government that at the end of the Brexit process the people of Scotland should have a choice about our future direction as a country.

“Indeed the implications of Brexit are so potentially far reaching that as they become clearer I think people will increasingly demand that choice.”

But she added that she wanted to “reassure” people that her proposal was “not for a referendum now” but was to give them a choice at the end of the Brexit process when there was “clarity” about the options.

She said she would “reset” her proposals laid out in March when she said a vote should be held between autumn next year and spring 2019.

“We will not seek to introduce the legislation for an independence referendum immediately,” Ms Sturgeon said.

“Instead, we will - in good faith - redouble our efforts and put our shoulder to the wheel in seeking to influence the Brexit talks in a way that protects Scotland’s interests.

We will seek to build maximum support around the proposals set out in the paper that we published in December - Scotland’s Place in Europe - to keep us in the single market, with substantial new powers for this parliament. We will do everything we can to influence the UK in that direction.

“Then at the end of this period of negotiation with the EU - likely to be around next autumn - when the terms of Brexit will be clearer, we will come back to Parliament to set out our judgment on the best way forward at that time, including our view on the precise time-scale for offering people a choice over the country’s future.”

How the other parties reacted

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson called on Ms Sturgeon to “give the country some certainty” by taking the Referendum Bill off the table for the rest of this parliament.

She said: “Yes voters and No voters, most people simply don’t want this brought back any time soon and none of the questions - none of the questions - that are raised by Brexit are answered by ripping Scotland out of our own union of nations, our biggest market and our closest friends.

“I’m afraid to say that that statement will fail to give an assurance to those people that this First Minister is listening to them.

“Again, she makes virtually no mention of her domestic responsibilities.

“Instead she appears to be in denial about her mistakes over this last year and, as a result, is leaking credibility and confidence in her leadership by the hour.

“Her response actually hasn’t been to reflect but to simply lash out at the UK Government at every opportunity and to sing the same old songs in the same old tune.”

Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale urged Ms Sturgeon to “get on with the job that really matters - improving our schools, growing our economy and fixing our NHS”.

She said: “The First Minister says she has heard the views of the people, that she’s reflected on the result of the general election, and her incredulous conclusion is to double down and continue with her campaign for independence.

“The truth is the threat of an unwanted second independence referendum is dead and this didn’t happen because Nicola Sturgeon wanted it to, the people of Scotland have taken that decision for her.

“The First Minister is digging her heels in, putting her fingers in her ears and pressing on regardless. She is just not listening.

“First Minister, why don’t you understand the people of Scotland sent you a clear message at the general election - get back to governing.”

The Scottish Greens urged the First Minister not to retreat from her referendum timetable.

Co-convener Patrick Harvie said: “Scotland has not consented to being taken out of the European Union against our will.

“Scotland has not consented to the social and economic wreckage which we know will result if that happens.

“If the First Minister does not introduce a referendum bill until after autumn next year, how long will it be after we’ve been dragged out of Europe without having consented to it before the people of Scotland are even entitled to make their choice?

“Why after a negotiation between a UK Government and EU institutions, and decisions made by every other member state in Europe, why should the people of Scotland be the only people without the right to make a decision on that timescale?”

Liberal Democrat leader Willie Rennie said “absolutely nothing has changed” in Ms Sturgeon’s approach.

“If she wants to prove she has listened, the First Minister should trigger a vote in this chamber which would rule out another independence referendum in this parliamentary term,” he said.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TOM PETERKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488099.1498580650!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488099.1498580650!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks in the Chambers in the Scottish Parliament where she said the Government will reset indyref2 plans. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks in the Chambers in the Scottish Parliament where she said the Government will reset indyref2 plans. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488099.1498580650!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4488100.1498580652!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4488100.1498580652!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4488100.1498580652!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498577251370"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/jd-wetherspoon-unveils-major-eu-investment-in-dublin-1-4487352","id":"1.4487352","articleHeadline": "JD Wetherspoon unveils major EU investment in Dublin","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498545790000 ,"articleLead": "

Pubs giant JD Wetherspoon, founded by vocal Brexit-backing chairman Tim Martin, has announced its biggest ever single investment – into the European Union.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487351.1498545971!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "JD Wetherspoon founder Tim Martin is a vocal supporter of Brexit. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

The company is to invest €15 million (£13m) into developing a new pub and 98-bedroom hotel in Dublin city centre, which will create around 200 jobs.

Development work at the site, currently a row of derelict properties in Camden Street, will begin in February, with the pub and hotel set to open in early 2019.

• READ MORE: Wetherspoon founder Tim Martin blasts CBI over Brexit

Announcing the investment in the Republic of Ireland’s capital, Martin, who founded the chain in 1979 as a 24-year-old, emphasised the commercial rationale for the bumper investment.

“We are looking forward to developing the site into a fantastic pub and hotel,” he said.

“It will be the biggest single investment undertaken by Wetherspoon and will result in our largest hotel alongside a superb pub.

“Our pubs in the Republic of Ireland are thriving and we are confident that the pub and hotel will be a great asset to Dublin and act as a catalyst for other businesses to invest in the city.”

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

The company has five pubs in the country, including The Linen Weaver in Cork and The Three Tun Tavern in Blackrock. The new Dublin pub will be set over two levels and, unusually for Wetherspoon, will feature a beer garden.

Some historical aspects of the derelict buildings will be retained and restored. These include a circular stained glass window which was crafted by Earley & Company (church decorators and stone carvers) who were based at the site.

Martin owns 28 per cent of Wetherspoon, whose 950-plus pub estate in Britain includes about 70 ­outlets in Scotland. He has repeatedly accused the EU of being an undemocratically elected body sustained by political elites.

• READ MORE: JD Wetherspoon chairman calls for EU staff to remain

He has used several company updates to criticise the likes of German chancellor Angela Merkel, former French president Francois Hollande, European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker and former UK Chancellor, George Osborne.

Saying he felt vindicated that he made the right call in campaigning against Britain joining the euro in 1999, Martin told Scotland on Sunday last year: “Too many of these politicians have been loved since they were aged four, top of the class, they have been told they are brainier than anybody else, and then they find they only have the same vote as the riff-raff. They like Brussels and are predisposed to the EU.”

Wetherspoon, whose ­Scottish pubs include the Alexander Graham Bell in Edinburgh and The Carron Works in Falkirk, said in a trading update last month that like-for-like sales climbed 4 per cent in the third quarter to 23 April, while total sales rose 1.3 per cent.

The group forecast a “slightly improved trading outcome” for this financial year thanks to better than expected year-to-date sales, with same-floorspace sales up 3.5 per cent and total sales up 1.4 per cent.

However, Martin repeated his warning that the pubs ­sector remains under pressure from higher staff wages, higher energy bills, alcohol duties and cheap beer sold by supermarkets.

Click here to ‘Like’ The Scotsman Business on Facebook

" ,"byline": {"email": "mflanagan@scotsman.com" ,"author": "martin flanagan"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487351.1498545971!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487351.1498545971!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "JD Wetherspoon founder Tim Martin is a vocal supporter of Brexit. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "JD Wetherspoon founder Tim Martin is a vocal supporter of Brexit. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487351.1498545971!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/david-mundell-s-position-becoming-untenable-say-snp-1-4488052","id":"1.4488052","articleHeadline": "David Mundell’s position ‘becoming untenable’, say SNP","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498579348000 ,"articleLead": "

David Mundell’s position as Scotland Secretary is “becoming untenable” after he promised that a deal between the Conservatives and the DUP would result in a funding boost north of the border, the SNP has claimed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479213.1498579345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scottish Secretary David Mundell has come under pressure from the SNP. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

Nicola Sturgeon’s party said Mr Mundell had been left “utterly humiliated” by Theresa May’s agreement with the Democratic Unionist Party, which will deliver an extra £1bn of public funding for Northern Ireland.

The Government has confirmed that the deal will not result in any additional funding for Scotland or other devolved parts of the UK, with the extra cash being provided outside the Barnett Formula.

Before the agreement was struck, Mr Mundell said he would not support funding that “deliberately sought to subvert the Barnett rules” and would seek to block any deal that relied on “back door” money for Northern Ireland.

The day before the Tory-DUP deal was announced, he was quoted in a Scottish Sunday newspaper as saying: “The Barnett Formula is to Scotland’s advantage.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon ‘resets’ indyref2 plans

“I’m not going to do anything to prejudice that.

“Any funding that goes to Northern Ireland, then Barnett rules will ensure the appropriate funding comes to Scotland.”

Formal dispute

On Tuesday the Scottish Government said it was “likely” to trigger formal dispute resolution talks over the £1bn deal, describing it as a “gross breach of the established principles of devolution”.

The Barnett Formula dictates the amount of UK Government money that is distributed to Scotland, the other devolved nations and English regions.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon to formally dispute DUP deal

It is designed so that any increase or reduction in funding for devolved services in England should result in a similar pounds-per-person change for other areas – known as “Barnett consequentials”.

“Mr Mundell insisted, repeatedly, that he would not stand for a deal that saw extra funding for Northern Ireland without any extra funding for Scotland,” said the SNP’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford.

“He said, unequivocally, that he wouldn’t stand for it.

“Either he has gone back on his word and agreed to the deal, or he’s been left out of the loop and utterly humiliated.

“Either way, there is no way that David Mundell can credibly claim to be standing up for Scotland’s interests in the Cabinet.”

Downing Street has insisted that the Barnett Formula does not apply to the new money, as it is being provided on top of the block grant given to the Northern Ireland Executive.

Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson pointed out that the formula also did not apply to the various city deals in Scotland and Wales, or to previous packages of support for Northern Ireland.

“The UK Government has always been able to spend outside Barnett – like the city deals, which invested £500m directly in Glasgow, £125m in Aberdeen and £53m in Inverness.

“It’s absurd for the SNP to criticise UK Government spending on top of Barnett in Northern Ireland when the exact same thing happens in Scotland.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CHRIS GREEN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4479213.1498579345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4479213.1498579345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Scottish Secretary David Mundell has come under pressure from the SNP. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scottish Secretary David Mundell has come under pressure from the SNP. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4479213.1498579345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498577251370"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/nicola-sturgeon-to-formally-dispute-dup-conservative-deal-1-4487833","id":"1.4487833","articleHeadline": "Nicola Sturgeon to formally dispute DUP/ Conservative deal","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498570011000 ,"articleLead": "

Nicola Sturgeon’s administration is to declare a formal dispute with the UK Government over the £1 billion deal with the DUP to prop up Theresa May.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4473049.1498582439!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

After a meeting of Ms Sturgeon’s Cabinet, her spokesman said the Scottish Government would invoke a “dispute resolution mechanism” through the Joint Ministerial Council (JMC), the body dealing with relations between the UK Government and devolved administrations.

The process will be outlined in a letter to be sent by Finance Secretary Derek Mackay to the Chief Secretary of the Treasury Liz Truss.

“As well as writing to the Treasury today it is likely the Scottish Government will be invoking the UK Government with a view to invoking the dispute resolution mechanism under the JMC process,” the spokesman said.

“Cabinet expressed its displeasure at the nature of the deal with the DUP, which would appear to be a gross breach of established principles of devolution.”

The SNP has argued that the £1 billion for Northern Ireland should mean Scotland getting £2.9 billion if the funds were distributed by the Barnett Formula.

The extra cash negotiated by the DUP will not be handed over via Barnett, but sees an increase in Northern Ireland’s block grant.

The Barnett Formula has been designed to ensure that if funding goes up in England, there are consequentials for the devolved nations.

Scottish secretary David Mundell previously told the BBC he would not support a funding deal “which deliberately sought to subvert the Barnett rules”.

Ms Sturgeon’s spokesman said: “In terms of Scottish Secretary’s position, it is for David Mundell to reconcile previous statements with what has happened. But on the face of it they are completely and fundamentally at odds. So really the Scottish Secretary has to make a public statement about how is previous statements can be squared with what has happened.”

Remarkable Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TOM PETERKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4473049.1498582439!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4473049.1498582439!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4473049.1498582439!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/education/spending-on-scottish-schools-to-rise-this-year-1-4487749","id":"1.4487749","articleHeadline": "Spending on Scottish schools to rise this year","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498565717000 ,"articleLead": "

Spending on Scotland’s local authorities for 2016/17 is to be reduced by £119 million (-1.0 per cent) to £11.875 billion when compared with the previous year, the Scottish Government has said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487748.1498565716!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Education Secretary John Swinney"} ,"articleBody": "

Scottish Government budget estimate figures revealed spending on education, however, is to go up by £86 million (1.8 per cent) to £4.879 billion.

Social work will see a reduction of £37 million (-1.2 per cent) to £3.139 billion – although the government said the figure did not include the £250 million made available from the health budget as a result of Integration Joint Boards.

Education amounted to 41.1 per cent of total expenditure and social work accounted for 26.4 per cent.

Local Authorities received £6.837 billion (58.5 per cent of funding) from Scottish Government Grants, received £2.768 billion (23.7 per cent) from non-domestic rates and raised £2.075 billion (17.8 per cent of funding) from council tax. This funding totalled £11.680 billion, with 195 million being funded from local authority reserves.

Education Secretary John Swinney welcomed the extra cash for schools.

He said: “Investment in education is an investment in the future of Scotland’s young people, and so I very much welcome this increase by local authorities - both in terms of last year’s expected spend and allocated budgets for the year ahead.

“However, the way this funding is currently allocated to schools is complex, lacks transparency and varies from council to council. We want far more decisions on school funding to be in the hands of those with the expertise and insight to target resources at the greatest need – the schools themselves.

“We are already giving an additional £120 million Pupil Equity Funding directly to head teachers to tackle the poverty-related attainment gap in their schools. We want to build on this approach with a fair funding system for schools. Our consultation runs until 13 October, and I urge everyone to have their say.”

Remarkable Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TOM PETERKIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487748.1498565716!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487748.1498565716!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Education Secretary John Swinney","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Education Secretary John Swinney","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487748.1498565716!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/pm-accused-of-jeopardising-peace-in-northern-ireland-with-dup-deal-1-4487613","id":"1.4487613","articleHeadline": "PM accused of jeopardising peace in Northern Ireland with DUP deal","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498560100000 ,"articleLead": "

THERESA May has been accused of jeopardising peace in Northern Ireland, after reaching a £1 billion deal with the Democratic Unionist Party to prop up her minority Government.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487612.1498560099!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May greets Arlene Foster, the leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party in Downing Street. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

The deal struck in 10 Downing Street after negotiations stretching 18 days since the June 8 General Election also saw the Conservatives formally ditch plans to abolish the triple-lock protection for state pensions and means-test the winter fuel payment during this Parliament.

Under a “confidence and supply” arrangement intended to last until 2022, the DUP guaranteed that its 10 MPs will vote with the Government on the Queen’s Speech, the Budget, and legislation relating to Brexit and national security.

Together with the 317 Tory MPs remaining after Mrs May’s disastrous decision to call a snap election, this will allow the Prime Minister to pass the 326 figure required for an absolute majority in the House of Commons, ensuring her victory in key divisions and protecting her Government from collapse.

Speaking after talks in Number 10 with DUP leader Arlene Foster, Mrs May said the two parties “share many values” and the agreement was “a very good one”.

The agreement would “enable us to work together in the interests of the whole United Kingdom, give us the certainty we require as we embark on our departure from the European Union, and help us build a stronger and fairer society at home”, said the Prime Minister.

Mrs Foster said she was “delighted” with a package which includes £1 billion of new funding for infrastructure and health, along with enhanced flexibility on almost £500 million of previously allocated cash.

The cash will go to the Northern Ireland executive if the devolved institutions are restored by the deadline of June 29. If direct rule is reimposed, the money would remain available, but would be controlled from London.

There were immediate demands for similar largesse for other parts of the UK, with the Welsh executive saying the principality was due almost £1.7 billion under the so-called “Barnett formula” which governs how money is distributed between the four nations.

Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones described the payment as a “straight bung to keep a weak Prime Minister and a faltering Government in office”.

And the Scottish National Party’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford insisted Scotland should get “its fair share”.

Denouncing the “grubby” deal with the DUP, Mr Blackford said: “For years the Tories have been cutting budgets and services, but suddenly they have found a magic money tree to help them stay in power.”

Downing Street said the Barnett formula does not apply to the new money as it is being provided as an addition to the Northern Ireland Executive’s block grant.

• READ MORE: How long will Theresa May stay in office?

Labour branded the deal “shabby and reckless”, and warned it would undermine the trust in the impartiality of the British Government which was vital to the implementation of the Good Friday Agreement.

“For the Government to be putting such an agreement in jeopardy just to prop up this dismal Prime Minister is nothing short of a disgrace,” shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry told the House of Commons.

In an attempt to allay concerns about the impact on the peace process, the deal makes clear that Conservatives remain committed to the restoration of power-sharing and that the DUP will have “no involvement in the UK Government’s role in political talks in Northern Ireland”.

Sinn Fein said the DUP were effectively supporting continued austerity and cuts, as well as “a blank cheque for a Tory Brexit which threatens the Good Friday Agreement”.

The party’s president Gerry Adams raised concerns about the commitment contained in the deal for Tories and the DUP to support the implementation of the Armed Forces Covenant throughout the UK. Sinn Fein will “resolutely oppose” any preferential treatment for British soldiers on services like healthcare, education and housing under the terms of the Covenant, as they do on the mainland, he said.

Outlining the terms of the agreement in the House of Commons, First Secretary of State Damian Green said that only the Conservatives had “the ability and legitimacy to lead the Government our country needs”, adding: “As the party with the most seats at the General Election, the Conservative Party had a duty to form a government.

• READ MORE: Theresa May under fire over ‘grubby deal’ with DUP

“It is right that we talked to other parties to seek to ensure that the Government can provide the competence the country needs at this crucial time.”

Mr Green said the agreement, signed in 10 Downing Street by Tory chief whip Gavin Williamson and the DUP’s Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, should help to break the deadlock at Stormont which has meant there has been no power-sharing executive since elections in March.

Mr Adams said any extra money for Northern Ireland was a good thing, and the restoration of power-sharing was the only way to ensure it was fairly distributed.

“We may be able to say well done Arlene, when we have the executive in place,” he said.

The agreement will remain in place for the length of this Parliament, due to end in 2022, and can be reviewed “by the mutual consent of both parties”, the document says.

But Downing Street made clear that the money will not be withdrawn if the DUP fails to live up to voting commitments.

The DUP’s support in votes which are not covered by the confidence and supply arrangements will be agreed “on a case-by-case basis”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487612.1498560099!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487612.1498560099!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May greets Arlene Foster, the leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party in Downing Street. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May greets Arlene Foster, the leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party in Downing Street. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487612.1498560099!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/nicola-and-corbyn-named-in-hottest-new-baby-naming-trends-1-4487552","id":"1.4487552","articleHeadline": "Nicola and Corbyn named in hottest new baby-naming trends","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498558858000 ,"articleLead": "

NEW parents are electing to name their children after politicians - with Corbyn the hottest new baby-naming trend, a study has found.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487550.1498558838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's surge in popularity shows no sign of abating with the most recent trend being for parents to name their babies after him. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

More than half of parents are now considering using the name Corbyn for their next child following the Labour leader’s post-General Election popularity surge, while Nicola is becoming a more popular name in Scotland, with 13 per cent of mums and dads claiming they would use the name, compared to 12 per cent of parents choosing Leanne in Wales.

The name had soared 50 per cent in popularity between 2014 and 2015 - the last year naming data is available - but is set to see an even sharper rise over the next 12 months.

The study found more than a quarter of parents are now inspired by politicians when choosing a name for their baby.

• READ MORE: Most popular Scottish baby names of 2016 revealed

Four in 10 claim May is a definite option, although only four per cent intend to call their new-born Theresa.

Cameron is the next most popular name, liked by a third of parents, followed by Jeremy, enjoying fresh popularity with 15 per cent of families.

However, only five per cent will consider naming their baby Boris or Diane, six per cent Donald and just one per cent believe Nigel will become a fashionable name again.

Across Britain, 1,305 parents were asked which names were increasing in popularity in their local area.

The fastest-growing up-and-coming trends revealed in the poll by parenting site ChannelMum.com include Muslim names going mainstream.

Six per cent of parents quizzed revealed more non-Muslim families using Muslim names.

The most commonly-used Muslim monikers include Zane, Zahra, Ayesha, Farah, Anila, Omar and Jana.

One in ten has seen an increase in babies with ‘tough names’ including Axl, Maverick and Diesel, and by contrast, Unicorn names including Rainbow, Twinkle, Sassy, Sparkle and Princess are also beginning to gain popularity.

Football ace Paul Pogba and Towie star Sam Faiers have helped to re-popularise the name Paul, with one in 25 parents seeing it used again.

There is also renewed interest in others 70s names including Michelle, Susan and even Gary.

And Viking and Scandi names are on the march, with Magnus, Agnes, Linnea, Freya, Annika, Astrid and Britta more popular, according to 13 per cent of parents.

Meanwhile, the more bizarre name phenomenons include text-message abbreviation names like Ily - meaning I Love You - spotted by one per cent of parents - and three per cent who have seen US place-names including Texas, Miami, Arizona and Tennessee used as baby names.

However, the most common current trend is surnames as first names.

Two thirds of parents report this is on the rise in their area, with top names including Cooper, Grayson, Parker, Quinn, Jones, Carter, Mason, Jackson, Hunter, Riley.

Traditional but not twee English names are undergoing a revival, with 61 per cent of parents embracing monikers including Sarah, Penelope, Emma and Lucy.

• READ MORE: Jeremy Corbyn wows the crowds at Glastonbury festival

The rise of gender-fluid culture means Gender Neutral names are becoming more popular. Alex, Charlie, Elliott, Ellis, Max and Sydney are among the names spotted more often by 41 per cent of parents.

And while it may be the least-used letter of the alphabet, X names are in-vogue, with Jaxxon, Xanthe, Xander and Jaxton the most picked for new babies, and voted more popular by 35 per cent of parents.

Meanwhile, 16 per cent of mums and dads have seen a flood of babies with water names including River, Lake, Delta and Coast, while 13 per cent report meeting tots named after the film Frozen, such as Elsa, Kai, Anna and Olaf.

However the study also showed the most disliked baby name trend is text-message names, shunned by 71 per cent of parents, followed by double-barrelled names such as Lily-Mae, which half of parents refuse to use.

A further 44 per cent wouldn’t name their child after a sports team while 38 per cent loathe unusual or unique spellings. And the Kardashian trend of using the same first letter for each child was turned down by 27 per cent of families.

Siobhan Freegard, founder of ChannelMum.com, said: “What’s in a name? Well rather a lot.

“Names reflect both changing fashions and our changing society, such as the rise in use of many beautiful Muslim names.

“With 70 per cent of families believing their child is judged on their name, a vast amount of love, care and attention is poured into picking the right moniker

“Corbyn is the stand-out naming trend this year and a strong name encompassing both the surname as first name and political name trend.

“We expect to see lots of babies conceived at Glastonbury or over the election period named after the Labour leader.

“But remember a week is a long time in politics and your child will have to have that name for a lifetime, so make sure you are sure before naming them after any politician.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487550.1498558838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487550.1498558838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's surge in popularity shows no sign of abating with the most recent trend being for parents to name their babies after him. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's surge in popularity shows no sign of abating with the most recent trend being for parents to name their babies after him. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487550.1498558838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487551.1498558847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487551.1498558847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "While the name Nicola is growing in popularity in Scotland. Picture: Jack Taylor/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "While the name Nicola is growing in popularity in Scotland. Picture: Jack Taylor/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487551.1498558847!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487589.1498558856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487589.1498558856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's surge in popularity shows no sign of abating with the most recent trend being for parents to name their babies after him. Picture: Ian Gavan/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's surge in popularity shows no sign of abating with the most recent trend being for parents to name their babies after him. Picture: Ian Gavan/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487589.1498558856!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/nicola-sturgeon-set-to-make-an-announcement-on-indyref2-1-4487447","id":"1.4487447","articleHeadline": "Nicola Sturgeon set to make an announcement on indyref2","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498556009000 ,"articleLead": "

NICOLA Sturgeon is expected to set out her position on a second independence referendum at Holyrood later on today.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487446.1498555454!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is expected to make an announcement later on today. Picture: SWNS"} ,"articleBody": "

The First Minister has been reflecting on her plans for a second vote following the General Election.

She tweeted on Tuesday morning: “I’ll be seeking agreement of @ScotParl to make a statement later today on the way forward for Scotland after the General Election.

Ms Sturgeon had been due to give a speech on Brexit to the Association of British Insurers in London but her appearance was cancelled on Tuesday morning.

Her plans to make a statement follow reports at the weekend suggesting she is to put her demand for a second independence referendum on hold to instead focus on delivering a “soft Brexit”.

• READ MORE: Theresa May under fire over ‘grubby deal’ with DUP

The First Minister set out her timetable for a second referendum in March, saying a vote should be held between autumn 2018 and spring 2019 to give Scots - the majority of whom voted to stay in the EU - an alternative to Brexit.

But she has been ‘’reflecting’’ on the plan after the snap General Election saw her party’s share of the vote fall from 50% to 37% as it lost 21 Westminster seats.

The issue was discussed at the Scottish Government cabinet meeting last week, with Ms Sturgeon said to be ‘’likely’’ to set out her position before Holyrood goes into recess on Thursday.

• READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon and Ruth Davidson clash over £1bn DUP deal

Her proposals for a statement also follow confirmation of a deal between the Conservatives and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) on Monday.

The agreement, which will see the DUP back Theresa May’s minority government in key votes, includes £1 billion in new funding for Northern Ireland.

What do you think of the scotsman.com commenting system? Have your say here

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487446.1498555454!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487446.1498555454!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is expected to make an announcement later on today. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is expected to make an announcement later on today. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487446.1498555454!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/charlotte-church-reveals-she-has-lost-her-unborn-baby-1-4487420","id":"1.4487420","articleHeadline": "Charlotte Church reveals she has lost her unborn baby","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498552384000 ,"articleLead": "

CHARLOTTE Church has announced that she has lost her unborn baby.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487419.1498552473!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The singer, 31, said on Twitter that she and her partner Jonathan Powell were grieving their loss. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

The singer, 31, said on Twitter that she and her partner Jonathan Powell were grieving their loss.

She wrote: “1 of 2 Charlotte and Jonny are very sad to announce that they lost their baby.

“Now is a time for grieving and being together as a family.”

A second message read: “2 of 2 We kindly ask everyone to respect that peace.”

Church had announced earlier this year she was expecting her third child.

It was thought the baby was due in November.

The star is already a mother to nine-year-old Ruby and Dexter, eight, from her previous relationship with Gavin Henson.

They parted company in 2010.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487419.1498552473!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487419.1498552473!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The singer, 31, said on Twitter that she and her partner Jonathan Powell were grieving their loss. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The singer, 31, said on Twitter that she and her partner Jonathan Powell were grieving their loss. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487419.1498552473!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/brexit-eu-nationals-will-have-to-apply-for-identity-cards-1-4487204","id":"1.4487204","articleHeadline": "Brexit: EU nationals will have to apply for identity cards","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498551889000 ,"articleLead": "

EU nationals will have to apply for identity cards to prove they have “settled status” after Brexit in order to live and work in the UK legally, it has been revealed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487203.1498551887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May wants to end the anxiety of EU nationals. Picture: AFP PHOTO / PRU"} ,"articleBody": "

Thousands of EU citizens who have already filled out an 85-page Home Office form and paid a fee to get confirmation of their legal status in the UK will have to re-apply.

Presenting a detailed paper on the government’s plans for EU citizens living in Britain after Brexit, Theresa May told Europeans anxious over their future: “We want you to stay.”

But critics have accused ministers of trying to bring in “ID cards by the back door” after the government said it may collect biometric data from EU citizens and store their details on a Home Office database.

The government paper outlines how EU nationals with five years’ continuous residence in the UK would be able to apply for permanent “settled status”. A two-year “grace period” after Brexit will allow those with less than five years’ residence to secure settled status.

“Under these plans, no EU citizen currently in the UK lawfully will be asked to leave at the point the UK leaves the EU,” the Prime Minister told the Commons yesterday. “No families will be split up.”

The government has yet to announce a cut-off date during the two-year negotiation period beyond which new arrivals from the EU will not be guaranteed the right to stay in the UK indefinitely.

EU citizens who secure settled status will have the same access to healthcare and benefits as British citizens, Mrs May confirmed. Pensions entitlements built up by EU citizens will be honoured, and Britons who live in Europe will continue to see their pensions uprated.

However, while EU citizens will continue to be able to bring spouses and family members to the UK without restrictions before Brexit, dependents arriving after the UK leaves the EU will be subject to existing immigration rules.

That means an EU worker in the UK will have to have an income of at least £18,600 in order to bring their spouse to join them, even after five years in the UK. And EU citizens who secure settled status could lose it permanently if they spend more than two years abroad.

Administering the new system presents the Home Office with a huge challenge, as it will have to process 4,100 applications per day in order to deal with the more than three million EU citizens in the UK within the two year grace period.

And while the Home Office has committed to “streamline” its systems, EU citizens will still have to provide years of documentation to prove their right to claim residence in the UK.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn denounced the proposals as “too little, too late”.

“This isn’t a generous offer,” he said. “This is confirmation the government is prepared to use people as bargaining chips.”

And SNP MP Stuart McDonald said the Prime Minister’s plans “marked a clear diminution of EU citizens’ rights”.

Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Ed Davey singled out Brexit secretary David Davis, who has been staunchly opposed to ID cards, over the government’s plans.

“David Davis resigned his seat and caused a by-election because he was disgusted by the assault on civil liberties by the then Labour government. What will he do this time round?” Mr Davey said he had written to the Home Secretary to ask for assurances on the proposal.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Paris Gourtsoyannis"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487203.1498551887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487203.1498551887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May wants to end the anxiety of EU nationals. Picture: AFP PHOTO / PRU","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May wants to end the anxiety of EU nationals. Picture: AFP PHOTO / PRU","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487203.1498551887!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/regions/edinburgh-fife-lothians/hms-queen-elizabeth-aircraft-carrier-leaves-rosyth-1-4486461","id":"1.4486461","articleHeadline": "HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier leaves Rosyth","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498546760000 ,"articleLead": "

The largest and most powerful ship ever built for the Royal Navy has set sail for the first time.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487335.1498546759!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: Ian Georgeson"} ,"articleBody": "

Naval staff and contractors lined the deck of HMS Queen Elizabeth as the 280-metre, 65,000-tonne aircraft carrier moved from Rosyth out into the Firth of Forth on Monday in a three-hour operation.

The £3 billion behemoth, which is set to be the nation’s future flagship, and her 700-strong ship’s company are heading to the North Sea for maiden sea trials over the summer.

One of the most delicate manoeuvres of the six-week trials has already been completed just moving the ship from the dock.

Navigators, pilots and tug boats had the slimmest of margins to deal with to guide HMS Queen Elizabeth out of the Rosyth basin in Fife where she was assembled.

At high tide, the ship was taken through a narrow gate avoiding the dock walls by inches while under the water line there was just half a metre between the bottom of the ship and the seabed.

Once travelling just a few hundred metres in the Forth, the carrier dropped anchor in order to wait for the tide to lower, allowing space to pass under the Firth’s famous bridges.

A total of 10,000 people worked on construction of the ship, made up in sections at yards around the UK and transported to Rosyth, where it was assembled.

Rear Admiral Keith Blount, head of the Navy’s carrier programme, said: “This ship has been built in a very unique way - assembled in Rosyth but built around the UK in six different yards.

“This is the moment where that British shipbuilding expertise meets the professionalism of the Royal Navy to give us a ship to be proud of.”

The second ship in the class, HMS Prince of Wales, is being fitted out in the Rosyth dock and staff were able to look on as its sister ship set sail for the first time.

Tony Holberry, a director of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, the group of companies that built the ship, was one of those watching on from Rosyth Port as the project he has been involved with for more than a decade came to fruition.

He said: “I was there before a contract was placed and I stood on the first piece of steel that was cut in Govan, and now look at it. It’s a very proud day.”

He laughed when asked if his work was now done.

“I think my job just starts actually, I’ve got to get the equipment on board, then transition it into the Navy, so this is just the start if the next part of the journey.”

The sea trials will take place in the North Sea before the carrier returns to Rosyth for further checks and any adjustments.

Commanding officer Captain Jerry Kyd said: ‘’After that we’re going back out for a further three weeks to test the ship on the more war-fighting capabilities - the radars, all the ship’s sensors, radios and things like that.

‘’At the end of that period we know that all the basics work.

“She’s done her test drive and after that we will go down to Portsmouth, the ship’s home, and get her finally ready to join the Royal Navy fleet, hopefully at the end of the year.’’

READ MORE: HMS Queen Elizabeth prepares to sail from Rosyth dockyard

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487335.1498546759!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487335.1498546759!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Picture: Ian Georgeson","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: Ian Georgeson","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487335.1498546759!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486459.1498470767!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486459.1498470767!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486459.1498470767!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486460.1498470770!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486460.1498470770!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486460.1498470770!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"1498546508378"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/scotland-s-economy-wages-and-employment-rate-still-below-crash-levels-1-4487118","id":"1.4487118","articleHeadline": "Scotland’s economy: wages and employment rate still below crash levels","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498545135000 ,"articleLead": "

Scotland has missed out on the UK’s jobs boom, with wages and the employment rate still lower than they were before the financial crash ten years ago, new research shows.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487117.1498545133!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon visits the Computershare's new office to announce new jobs in the city. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

One in six working Scots – about 440,000 – is also paid below the voluntary living wage, according to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. The organisation is hosting a major conference in Glasgow today and says that tackling poverty and inequality should be priorities in developing Scotland’s city deals.

Chief executive Campbell Robb said: “Scotland has enjoyed a strong economic record but too many people have not shared in its success – over a million people live in poverty, which is a cost and waste our economy and society cannot afford.

“We need the Scottish Government, city leaders and Westminster to work together to pursue this goal, starting with progress on Scotland’s city deals to tackle poverty.

“This agenda has momentum in England following the election of powerful metro mayors and with political and economic uncertainty ahead, Scotland needs inclusive growth now to create a stronger and fairer economy.

“We need growth but everyone needs to the benefit from it.”

The charity has urged the UK and Scottish governments to work with city leaders and businesses to ensure more people benefit from economic growth.

JRF said progress was crucial with just over a million people in Scotland living in poverty and one in five Scottish employees (441,000) paid below the voluntary living wage.

Analysis by the foundation highlights that the employment rate remains lower than it was before the recession, average wages are £32 lower they were ten years ago in real terms and one in six employees has no or very low qualifications. JRF said increased devolution and the development of city region and growth deals provided an opportunity to design a more inclusive economy.

Speaking before the summit on inclusive growth in Glasgow, Jane Wood, from the Business in the Community charity, said: “To achieve inclusive growth, we must ensure that everyone gets a more equal share of the pie whilst we work to make a bigger one.

“We need to improve productivity, career progression, job quality and equality of access to the labour market.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "SCOTT MACNAB"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487117.1498545133!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487117.1498545133!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon visits the Computershare's new office to announce new jobs in the city. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "First Minister Nicola Sturgeon visits the Computershare's new office to announce new jobs in the city. Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487117.1498545133!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/russell-wardrop-what-are-words-worth-a-lot-less-than-you-think-1-4486722","id":"1.4486722","articleHeadline": "Russell Wardrop: What are words worth? A lot less than you think","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498543247000 ,"articleLead": "

Elvis is alive, man never walked on the moon and words account for 7 per cent of the impact when you speak. Well, there’s a guy works down the chip shop swears he’s Elvis and my late aunt Jeannie showed me the Hollywood set Neil Armstrong walked on. So Albert Meharabian’s 1967 study – that impact from speech is broken down as 7 per cent words, 38 per cent voice, 55 per cent body language – is the only one I know that is ­nonsense.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486721.1498475921!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Barack Obamas joke was perfect for Ellen DeGeneres presentation. Picture: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Theresa May, now starring in her own black Ealing comedy, has proved me right: character, connection and narrative are much more important than tone, pace and pitch.

In his treatises concerning rhetoric, from the Peripatetic school of ancient western ­philosophy, Aristotle gave us ethos, pathos and logos. On a broader canvas, he also ­influenced much of subsequent Christian, Islamic and Jewish philosophy and pre-enlightenment science, whereas Meharabian simply gauged ­participants’ reactions to single words.

Ethos, pathos and logos is a good starting point. I’ll give an equal weighting of 30 per cent to each, leaving ten per cent for the X Factor: charisma. Alastair Campbell says much of what made Tony Blair an ­outstanding speaker was the ten per cent he put in when the spotlight hit.

Logos is your knowledge. That is displaying knowledge, not just having it. There are no points for being too clever. Speaking to the purpose and staying on ­message, structuring with clarity and effectively keeping listeners onside make up this 30 per cent. The best speakers always appear to be doing it for you, not to you.

Pathos is how you reach out emotionally. That means ­elucidating your key ­messages with ­metaphor and ­analogy, ­saying it like you mean it and making them laugh. At the most poignant moment of his two ­minutes when giving Ellen DeGeneres the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Barack Obama changes the mood by saying, “we all want a tortilla chip that supports the weight of guacamole”.

A memorable, hilariously juxtaposed ­metaphor to use about ­someone who, two ­decades ago, came out at great ­personal cost.

Ethos is how you appear to listeners: Respect them by scrubbing up nice, stand straight, speak up. This is where Meharabian and I are on the same stage, because body language and voice matter, but half of this 30 per cent goes on character. For Aristotle and me, body ­language and voice get only five per cent each, down from 93 per cent. Another five goes on the right shoes: snazzy, not strong and stable. Five out of five for being well shod, PM.

The only disagreement Aristotle and I have is on how appropriate sandals are. We have increased the ­importance of words from Meharabian’s seven to 60 per cent, all of logos and pathos, because words are remembered long after Elvis has left the building.

Next time you address the troops it’s not a giant leap to believe your words are the most important thing, it’s one small step. Don’t get me ­started on Boris.

Russell Wardrop is CEO of Kissing With Confidence, which coaches business leaders in presentational skills.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486721.1498475921!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486721.1498475921!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Barack Obamas joke was perfect for Ellen DeGeneres presentation. Picture: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Barack Obamas joke was perfect for Ellen DeGeneres presentation. Picture: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486721.1498475921!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/hannah-scott-war-drama-that-could-give-gaelic-a-new-voice-1-4486697","id":"1.4486697","articleHeadline": "Hannah Scott: War drama that could give Gaelic a new voice","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498543230000 ,"articleLead": "

A Scottish film ­company ­is adapting the story of two soldiers who used Gaelic to confuse and evade pursuing Germans in the Second World War.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486696.1498475307!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A Gaelic adviser on the new film has also worked on hit series Outlander"} ,"articleBody": "

Burning Horseshoe hope the film will bring a unique insight into Scotland’s ­founding language.

Gaelic has existed as long as Scotland has. When the Irish settled here in 500AD, it began spreading across the country. However, as time has passed there are less ­people speaking it.

Gaelic’s biggest setback came in the 18th century, with English rule in ­Scotland. As one member of ­Burning Horseshoe puts it: “For ­decades, native speakers were told that their language was inferior and they were often forced to give up their native tongue.”

According to the 2011 ­census, there are only 60,000 Gaelic speakers left in ­Scotland. However, five ­universities in Scotland offer an honours degree in ­Gaelic. Gaelic-speaking schools are increasing as part of the ­Scottish Government’s Gaelic language plan. We’ve seen the introduction of the BBC Alba channel and road signs with Gaelic place names.

But what impact does this have at a personal level? Lydia Quinn, a student from Glasgow attended a Gaelic medium school. She says: “It has brought me many new opportunities, I feel more confident in my own country, I understand the road signs, old songs and poetry.

“Many interesting historical events happened where the older generation will have used Gaelic as their first ­language. Being able to ­communicate with these ­people is something I’ll be forever thankful for,

“This is our own language, we should be proud of it”.

The memoirs of a Scottish soldier who spoke Gaelic to escape being killed by a ­German firing squad is the basis for In the Darkest Hour.

Writer and producer Stephan Don heard of the ­story through his father, an intelligence officer in the ­Second World War. Lead actors Jim ­Sturgeon and Josh Tevendale are both Scots but do not speak Gaelic. So they will be guided by Àdhamh Ó Broin, who has also worked on hit TV series Outlander.

Burning Horseshoe believe the film may inspire ­others to discover the ­language, ­saying: “We ­strongly believe this is a ­fascinating story that deserves to be shared internationally, with the emphasis on how important Gaelic can be for cultures and individuals. Our film could encourage both native speakers and ­foreigners to appreciate ­Gaelic and to learn more about Scottish history.”

It’s a feeling echoed by Lydia, who said: “I hope that, through media like this, the Gaelic community can grow through our country’s collective love of the arts”

Development funds have been received from Northern Ireland Screen and fundraising for production begins next month. Filming is due to begin next summer, with an estimated release in 2019.

Gaelic is a rich part of Scottish heritage. With the right media coverage and attitude from Scotland’s population we can learn it –and perhaps make Gaelic our true national language once again.

Hannah Scott is a journalism student at the University of the West of Scotland in Ayr.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486696.1498475307!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486696.1498475307!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A Gaelic adviser on the new film has also worked on hit series Outlander","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A Gaelic adviser on the new film has also worked on hit series Outlander","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486696.1498475307!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/michael-mckean-yemen-a-war-that-s-slipped-under-the-radar-1-4486703","id":"1.4486703","articleHeadline": "Michael McKean: Yemen - a war that’s slipped under the radar","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498543213000 ,"articleLead": "

The world’s largest ­humanitarian disaster is unfolding, largely away from the gaze of the world’s media, in a country which most people may remember as the setting of a ­prize-winning novel and Ewan McGregor romantic comedy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps"} ,"articleBody": "

Yemen, an Arab country of 26 million people, is a far cry from the country portrayed in the fantastical Salmon Fishing in the Yemen and for more than two years has been gripped by a devastating civil war.

Innocent civilians are bearing the brunt of the war. Families have been displaced and torn apart, schools closed, ­children are prisoners in their homes. Cholera is rife with a new child infected every 35 seconds. Increasingly, Yemen has become isolated with food imports drying up and a hunger crisis engulfing the country. UN figures estimate that 17 million people are struggling to find enough to eat.

Within that, seven million ­Yemenis are on the brink of ­famine. A population ­larger than that of Scotland, is reducing food ­consumption to such ­levels that people are perishing from hunger. Two million children are acutely malnourished, with a child dying every ten minutes from preventable diseases. Yet the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan for Yemen remains less than a third funded.

Before the Arab Spring protests that shook the Middle East in 2011, Yemen was already the Arab world’s poorest country. An agricultural economy with little mass production or valuable natural resources, Yemenis lived as they have for ­decades, subsisting on mountainous and dry lands. But the protests failed to usher in a political transition that was ­supposed to bring stability. In 2015, the situation collapsed into a civil war between forces loyal to President Hadi and those allied to the Houthi rebel movement, both of which claim to constitute the ­Yemen government.

Edinburgh-based Mercy Corps has been working in Yemen since 2010. Before the war, we focussed on helping Yemeni communities build sustainable livelihoods, like supporting sesame farmers to improve production and access markets. But now, more than two years into the war, we’re just trying to keep ­families alive. We ­provide vouchers so that ­people can buy food, water and ­other emergency supplies, which also helps local traders to stay in business, receive valuable income and continue to provide jobs.

But the needs go far beyond food. A cholera outbreak has affected more than 120,000 people in the past six weeks. Mercy Corps teams are working tirelessly to stem its spread by providing water filters, chlorination tablets and hygiene kits, as well as prevention education, to 350,000 people.

What the McGregor film did do well was portray the natural beauty of Yemen’s landscape and the warmth of the ­Yemeni people who, right now, are ­living through a catastrophe. ­In my 20 years of ­working in the humanitarian ­sector, I do not believe we have faced a greater test.

Michael McKean is director of ­programmes, Mercy Corps Europe. Mercy Corps is a leading global organisation headquartered in ­Edinburgh and working in more than 40 ­countries.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Yemenis gather to carry home food rations provided by Mercy Corps","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4486702.1498500265!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/police-forensic-improvements-not-delivered-says-watchdog-1-4487085","id":"1.4487085","articleHeadline": "Police forensic improvements not delivered, says watchdog","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498542425000 ,"articleLead": "

The Scottish Police Authority (SPA) and Police Scotland have failed to deliver improvements to forensic services, a watchdog has concluded.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487084.1498542423!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Forensics improvements have not been carried out in Scotland. Picture: Jon Savage"} ,"articleBody": "

HM Inspectorate of Constabulary in Scotland (HMICS) found there has been no strategy in place for the delivery of forensic services in Scotland for more than four years.

A HMICS report on how the service is managed and delivered by the SPA makes 23 recommendations for improvement.

Key findings published in advance of the full report state that while the quality of forensic work undertaken in Scotland is good, the SPA “has not provided strategic leadership” and “has not put in place a clearly-established strategy, investment plan and joint planning cycle”.

“The SPA and Police Scotland have failed to deliver on a number of improvement initiatives due to a lack of resource and cohesive approach to continuous improvement,” it states.

HMICS also identified “weaknesses” in the strategic engagement with Police Scotland and the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.

It found forensic services were “consistently working above capacity” with levels of demand coupled with the geographical spread of staff and functional structures presenting “major challenges” for leadership, management and staff morale.

The report highlights “weak communication and engagement between management, staff and unions”, and ongoing challenging financial circumstances.

The operating budget for forensic services was £27.7 million in 2016-17, just 2.6% of the overall SPA policing budget.

HMICS also concludes the failure to deliver the Police Scotland i6 computer system “presents major challenges in terms of productions handling, demand analysis, management reporting and process efficiency for forensic services”.

Gill Imery, assistant inspector of constabulary at HMICS, who led the review, said: “Forensic services play a key role in supporting the justice system in Scotland in the investigation, detection and prosecution of crime.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CATRIONA WEBSTER"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487084.1498542423!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487084.1498542423!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Forensics improvements have not been carried out in Scotland. Picture: Jon Savage","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Forensics improvements have not been carried out in Scotland. Picture: Jon Savage","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487084.1498542423!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/theresa-may-leads-calls-to-speed-up-cladding-tests-1-4487124","id":"1.4487124","articleHeadline": "Theresa May leads calls to speed up cladding tests","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498539613000 ,"articleLead": "

The Prime Minister has led calls for authorities to speed up testing of potentially flammable material on high-rise towers amid fears of an escalating safety crisis.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487123.1498504479!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May has called for speeding up of cladding tests. Picture: Philip Toscano - WPA Pool/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Theresa May chaired a meeting of the Grenfell Recovery Taskforce as more at-risk buildings were identified across the country.

Hospitals and schools will also be tested to make sure they are not encased in combustible cladding, Downing Street said.

Every cladding sample examined so far has failed fire safety tests, amounting to 60 high-rise buildings in 25 local authorities across the country, the Government said.

Mrs May and Communities Secretary Sajid Javid echoed calls made by a minister for samples to be submitted promptly.

Housing Minister Alok Sharma said: “Certainly, some councils are acting very quickly.

“We want all of them to be acting urgently on this. People should not wait for the checks to come back from these (tests).

“They should act now, get the fire service in, check the buildings that they think may be affected, put in place mitigation measures, if required, or, as in the case of Camden, if they need to evacuate, that needs to happen.”

The Department of Health and Department for Education will oversee the testing of schools and hospitals, according to Downing Street. The scope of the forthcoming public inquiry into the blaze is expected to widen, examining the apparent widespread use of the cladding. Mrs May’s official spokesman said questions over why the material was used on tower blocks nationwide despite breaching fire safety rules would likely be scrutinised.

“It is clearly a huge concern this is the case,” the spokesman said. What is apparent is that this is on buildings across the country in local authorities run by all sorts of different parties.

“The job for the public inquiry will be to find out how and why this happened. I would expect that to be part of the terms of reference.”

The spokesman was unable to confirm a date for the announcement of a judge to head the Grenfell inquiry and the publication of terms of reference.

“We are making good progress in the appointment of a judge, in co-operation with the Lord Chief Justice, and we hope to be able to make an announcement as soon as possible,” he said.

The spokesman said the authorities had the capacity to test 100 samples of cladding material a day and were nowhere near reaching that.

“We are testing this material as soon as it comes to us and we request that landlords get this material to us urgently,” he said.

Tests can be completed in a matter of hours and councils are informed immediately of the results, with action taken to ensure buildings are made safe, he added.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ANGUS HOWARTH"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487123.1498504479!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487123.1498504479!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May has called for speeding up of cladding tests. Picture: Philip Toscano - WPA Pool/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May has called for speeding up of cladding tests. Picture: Philip Toscano - WPA Pool/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487123.1498504479!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/deal-keeps-tories-in-power-but-dup-could-come-back-for-more-1-4487189","id":"1.4487189","articleHeadline": "Deal keeps Tories in power, but DUP could come back for more","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1498539613000 ,"articleLead": "

The DUP have committed to keeping the Tories in power for five years, but could up their demands when the terms of their deal are reviewed each parliamentary session.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487188.1498508610!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (L) poses for a picture with Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster at 10 Downing Street. Picture: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

A controversial £1 billion funding package only covers the current two-year parliamentary session, leaving the door open to additional cash being demanded in future.

Under the “supply and confidence” arrangement struck in 10 Downing Street 18 days after the 8 June general election, the DUP has guaranteed that its ten MPs will vote with the government on the Queen’s Speech, the Budget, and legislation relating to Brexit and national security.

It will give Prime Minister Theresa May just enough votes to clear the 326 level required for an absolute majority in the Commons, ensuring victory on key issues. The DUP’s support in votes not covered by the confidence and supply arrangements will be agreed “on a case-by-case basis”.

The government has ditched plans to abolish the triple-lock protection for state pensions and means-test the winter fuel payment in exchange for support from the Democratic Unionist Party, it was confirmed yesterday.

Speaking after talks in Number 10 with DUP leader Arlene Foster, Mrs May said the two parties “share many values” and the agreement was “a very good one”.

Mrs Foster said she was “delighted” with a package which includes £1bn of new funding for infrastructure and health spending, along with enhanced flexibility on almost £500 million of previously allocated cash.

Mrs Foster returned to Belfast after signing the agreement in a bid to kick-start stalled talks on restoring Northern Ireland’s suspended power-sharing executive.

A return to power sharing would see Sinn Fein and the DUP able to take joint responsibility for spending the windfall, with Nationalist leader Gerry Adams giving the deal a cautious welcome.

Mr Adams said: “We may be able to say well done Arlene, when we have the Executive in place.”

But he added: “The only fair way to get whatever resources come to this place, the only forum or the only decision-making body that can do it in a fair way is the Executive.”

Following concerns that any deal could destabilise talks to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland, the deal says the DUP will not interfere with the government’s role as a neutral broker.

Mrs May insisted the government remains committed to the Northern Irish peace process under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement, and warned “time is running short” for parties to reach agreement to re-establish a powersharing Executive by 29 June.

“I hope the parties will look beyond their differences and come together with a shared sense of common purpose to serve all communities in the best interests of Northern Ireland,” she said. “Northern Ireland needs a functioning devolved government at this important time.”

The agreement came after lengthy negotiations which began on 9 June when the PM said she would “work with our friends and allies in the Democratic Unionist Party” to ensure the government could get its business through Parliament.

The agreement will remain in place for the length of this Parliament – due to end in 2022 – but will be reviewed each parliamentary session.

Mrs May said the agreement would “enable us to work together in the interests of the whole United Kingdom, give us the certainty we require as we embark on our departure from the European Union, and help us build a stronger and fairer society at home”.

Other features of the agreement include a shared commitment to spend 2 per cent of GDP on defence and guaranteed funding for agriculture in Northern Ireland after Brexit.

Democratic Unionist Party deputy leader Nigel Dodds slammed some of the “outrage” over the DUP deal as “hypocrisy of the highest order” as he said his party may publish its correspondence with Labour and SNP in previous general elections.

Speaking in the House of Commons, Mr Dodds said: “Someday I’d like to think we might publish all of the correspondence and conversations we had in 2010 with the Labour frontbench, and in 2015 with the Labour frontbench and indeed with the SNP as well. Because some of the full outrage that we have heard is hypocrisy of the highest order.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Paris Gourtsoyannis"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4487188.1498508610!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4487188.1498508610!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (L) poses for a picture with Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster at 10 Downing Street. Picture: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (L) poses for a picture with Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) leader Arlene Foster at 10 Downing Street. Picture: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4487188.1498508610!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}